Civil War Soldiers' Monument (1869), Saved in Time 2003

Saved in Time is a direct appeal to philanthropic individuals, organizations and companies to join The Green-Wood Historic Fund in conserving and restoring a selection of our endangered monuments, and to aid us in our obligation to preserve the artistic legacy of the past.

 

To learn more about “adopting” a specific monument or contributing to the Saved in Time program, please contact us online or call our main office at 718-210-3080 to request a Saved in Time booklet. You can also make an online donation today.

Some of Green-Wood’s monuments are older than the cemetery itself. Early works were often carved in marble or brownstone, two materials that are damaged by acid rain in the urban environment and the stressful coastal weather conditions of Green-Wood. Even durable granite and bronze are affected by natural forces, and the occasional act of vandalism can devastate any material. Fortunately art and science, which once were joined to create our historic monuments, come together again in modern times to offer respite to ailing outdoor works. In the hands of skilled and sensitive conservators, sculptors and architects, old and new techniques may be used to clean and stabilize deteriorated stone, protect metals, and recreate lost components, in order to render monuments whole and sound.

Saved in Time’s initial program of 20 monuments represents a variety of subject matter and materials, design and physical need that is reflective of the conservation issues existing throughout the cemetery. Electing to intervene in the process of their progressive deterioration raises sensitive curatorial choices, while seeking to provide active case studies for evaluation, and the opportunity to refine technical methodologies as the program moves forward. We have decided that not to act would be unconscionable. The alternative is to have statues and gravestones continue to corrode and disintegrate into unrecognizable condition, to see names and commemorative inscriptions become illegible, and for stones to collapse or sink into the ground. Unfortunately, this has been the fate of some of the oldest and most vulnerable objects in the collection.

 

Completed Projects

Since its inception in 2002, generous donations to Saved in Time have funded the stabilization and conservation of several of the cemetery’s most critically deteriorating monuments, including the Stewart Family Mausoleum by architect Stanford White, whose dislodged stonework has been reset, and two bronze angel sculptures on the Valentine and Weber Memorials, which were treated to control metal corrosion and enhance their appearance.

Follow the links below for more about other completed projects, the restoration originally needed, and photos of the restored monument. Continue to scroll down to learn more about projects still in need of your support.

HENRY CHADWICK (1824-1908), SAVED IN TIME 2004
The bronze plaque in the form of a baseball “diamond” featuring home plate and bases remembers Henry… More >
HENRY WARD BEECHER (1813-1887), SAVED IN TIME 2006
A stark and simple granite monument marks the grave of Henry Ward Beecher, the nationally renowned abolitionist and religious orator on…More >
HENRY JARVIS RAYMOND (1820–1869), SAVED IN TIME 2002
Henry J. Raymond was the founder and first editor of The New York Times. He launched his newspaper in 1851…More >
GENERAL HENRY WARNER SLOCUM (1826–1894), SAVED IN TIME 2003
General Slocum is perhaps the best known and most highly regarded Civil War general of the Union buried inMore >
WILLIAM WHEATLEY (1816–1876), SAVED IN TIME 2005
While theater in New York City dates back to the Colonial Period, it was not until 1866 that the… More >
CIVIL WAR SOLDIERS’ MONUMENT (1869), SAVED IN TIME 2003
This impressive monument, dedicated by the City of New York to ITS HEROIC DEADMore >
“INDIAN PRINCESS” – DO-HUM-ME (1824–1843), SAVED IN TIME 2005
Do-Hum-Me was the eighteen-year-old daughter of Nan-Nouce-Rush-Ee-Tol, a chief of the Sac Indians who came east from their lands in Kansas to… More >
 
 

Ongoing Projects

While some monuments have been “saved in time,” there are still many others in need of restoration before they deteriorate and age further. Your support is essential in funding the restoration of the monuments highlighted in this section, including the Saved In Time featured restoration project: The Gottschalk Project.

To learn more about “adopting” a specific monument or contributing to the Saved in Time program, please contact us online or call our main office at 718-210-3080 to request a Saved in Time booklet. You can also make an online donation today.

DOCTOR SUSAN S. McKINNEY-STEWARD (1846–1918)
Doctor Susan (Smith) McKinney-Steward was the first African-American woman physician in New York State and third in the United States. She… More >
CHARLOTTE CANDA (1828–1845)
The story of Charlotte Canda and the creation of her monument is a true Victorian drama, filled with tragedy… More >
BROWN FAMILY–STEAMER “ARCTIC” SINKING (1854)
The Brown Family Plot is an impressive commemoration including the beautiful original memorial of the maritime tragedy which too… More >
BROOKLYN THEATRE FIRE (1876)
Occurred December 5, 1876 Designer: Unknown Location: Corner of Battle Avenue, Bay View Avenue and Bay Side Avenue This monument marks the common grave of 103, out of the 278 persons who perished in Brooklyn’s mostMore >
JAMES BOGARDUS (1800-1874)
James Bogardus was the pioneering American inventor who developed the design and manufacture of modular cast iron… More >
“OUR DRUMMER BOY” CLARENCE D. MacKENZIE (1849–1861)
Clarence MacKenzie was only twelve years old when he marched… More >
ELIAS HOWE, JR. (1819-1867)
It was Elias Howe, not Singer, who invented and patented the sewing machine in America! Though his innovation was patented in…More >
JOHN MATTHEWS (1808–1870)
Known as the “Soda Fountain King” in the mid-19th century, John Matthews is credited with the development of a device to carbonate soft drinks… More >
PFIZER FAMILY MEMORIALS: PFIZER FAMILY PLOT (1907)
The Charles Pfizer Company, “Manufacturing Chemists,” was formed in Brooklyn in 1849. Their first plant was located on Bartlett and… More >
PIERREPONT FAMILY MEMORIAL: HENRY E. PIERREPONT (1808–1888)
Henry Evelyn Pierrepont was known as the “first citizen” of Brooklyn for good reason. He, along with his father… More >
CHARLES ADOLPH SCHIEREN (1842–1915)
The powerful symbolic feature of the Schieren Memorial is the bronze sculpture of Azrael, the Spirit of Death, by Solon Borglum. Solon was the… More >
JAMES GORDON BENNETT (1795-1872)
Born in Scotland and brought to America as a youngster, James Gordon Bennett Sr. entered the world of newspapers in New York, and founded The New York Herald in 1835More >