Concerts in the Catacombs

The Angel’s Share series features the world premiere of David Hertzberg’s The Rose Elf Beginning in June 2018, Unison Media and The Green-Wood Historic Fund will present an all-new series of classical music concerts entitled, The Angel’s Share, to be performed in Green-Wood’s Catacombs. The highly-anticipated series will present opera and chamber music in one … Read more

Biographies of World War I Veterans: Abel – Isdell

INTRODUCTORY NOTE (Click here for the second half of entries, Jackson-Zarick) Bio Search World War I, also called the First World War, the Great War, and the War to End All Wars, began in Europe in 1914. But it was not until April 6, 1917—100 years ago—that the United States Congress declared war against Germany. … Read more

Biographies of World War I Veterans: Jackson – Zarick

Please see the INTRODUCTORY NOTE at the beginning of the companion document that contains the World War I biographies covering the first section of the alphabet. Bio Search JACKSON, CHARLES WALTER (1885-1922). Second lieutenant, American Expeditionary Forces, Aero Squadron. Jackson was born in New York City. The 1910 census shows that he lived on Avenue … Read more

Civil War Biographies: A-Baird

ABBE, WALTER (1841-1924). Private, 37th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company F. A New York City native, Abbe was first educated in private schools, then attended public schools until 1856, when he entered the Free Academy of New York City from which he graduated in 1862. During the Civil War, he enlisted as a … Read more

“VIEW FROM BATTLE HILL, GREEN-WOOD CEMETERY,” BY JAMES SMILLIE, 1847

The illustration pictured here, “View from Battle Hill, Green-Wood Cemetery,” was drawn and engraved by James Smillie (1807-1885) for Green-Wood historian Nehemiah Cleaveland’s 1847 guide, Green-Wood Illustrated. For the book, Smillie executed a series of engravings capturing the vast serene landscape of Green-Wood in its early years. At that time, before Central Park or Prospect Park were established, the beautiful hills and dells of the cemetery served as an ideal setting for a family day out.

STEREOVIEW OF THE ANGEL OF THE WATERS, BY EMMA STEBBINS, CENTRAL PARK, c. 1870’s

The Angel of the Waters (1873), commonly referred to simply as the Bethesda Fountain, was one of the first large-scale public sculptures by a female artist. Green-Wood resident Emma Stebbins (1815-1882) designed the sculpture for Bethesda Terrace in New York City’s Central Park. Unveiled in 1873, the sculpture depicts the biblical story of an angel who came upon the pool of Bethesda in Jerusalem, stirring the water and imbuing it with healing powers.

CABINET CARD OF CLEMENCE LOZIER, PHOTOGRAPHED BY NAPOLEON SARONY, c. 1880s

During the first half of the nineteenth century it was almost unheard of for a woman to practice medicine, but pioneering female doctor Clemence Lozier (1813-1888) played a major role in changing that. Not only did she excel in the fields of obstetrics and general surgery, she also encouraged other women to pursue medicine by founding the New York Medical College and Hospital for Women in 1863. Lozier further helped to make basic medical knowledge accessible to the average woman, hosting lectures in her own home and writing health books specifically for women.

BANNERMAN MILITARY GOODS CATALOGUE, January 1945

About 50 miles north of New York City, on Pollepel Island in the Hudson River, stand the ruins of what resembles a huge castle. This is what remains of Bannerman’s Island Arsenal, a massive storage facility built by Francis Bannerman VI (1851-1918). A dealer and collector of military goods, Bannerman purchased the island in 1900 as a secure place to store his merchandise. He proceeded to build the world’s largest private arsenal, modeled in the style of a Scottish castle. The arsenal is pictured on the cover of this 1945 catalog, published by Francis Bannerman’s sons, who inherited the business after his death.