Remembering Their Service, 150 Years Later

It was a lot of work–but it certainly was worth it. And nothing compared to the sacrifice made by the men and women who played a role in the Civil War and are interred at Green-Wood. This spring marks the 150th anniversary of the end of America’s Civil War. Green-Wood pulled out all the stops … Read more

BANNERMAN MILITARY GOODS CATALOGUE, January 1945

About 50 miles north of New York City, on Pollepel Island in the Hudson River, stand the ruins of what resembles a huge castle. This is what remains of Bannerman’s Island Arsenal, a massive storage facility built by Francis Bannerman VI (1851-1918). A dealer and collector of military goods, Bannerman purchased the island in 1900 as a secure place to store his merchandise. He proceeded to build the world’s largest private arsenal, modeled in the style of a Scottish castle. The arsenal is pictured on the cover of this 1945 catalog, published by Francis Bannerman’s sons, who inherited the business after his death.

ILLUSTRATION OF THE GENERAL SLOCUM STEAMSHIP DISASTER, LE PETIT PARISIEN, July 3, 1904

When the steamship General Slocum caught fire in the East River of New York City on June 15, 1904, it claimed more lives than any other disaster in New York City history. An estimated 1,021 of the 1,342 people on board died, largely resulting from inaccessible and ineffective safety equipment. In the aftermath of the General Slocum Steamship Disaster, federal and state regulations were enacted to improve the emergency equipment on passenger ships. Forty-six identified victims of the disaster are buried in Green-Wood Cemetery.

PUBLICITY PHOTOGRAPH OF PAUL JABARA, c. 1970’s

Brooklyn native Paul Jabara (1948-1992) was the songwriter behind some of the most iconic songs of the disco era. Jabara wrote the hit “Last Dance” performed by Donna Summer for the 1978 film “Thank God It’s Friday,” earning him both a Grammy for Best R&B song and an Oscar for Best Original Song. He also co-wrote The Weather Girls hit “It’s Raining Men.”

Civil War Biographies: Introduction

Since 2002, hundreds of volunteers have worked in Green-Wood’s Civil War Project and have identified over 5,000 people interred at Green-Wood who played a role in the Civil War. Volunteers identified these individuals, located their graves, wrote their biographies, did follow-up research on them, and rewrote those biographies. We now share these biographies with you. … Read more

THE LAST POEMS OF ALICE AND PHOEBE CARY, COMPILED AND EDITED BY MARY CLEMMER AMES, 1873

Sisters Alice Cary (1820-1871) and Phoebe Cary (1824-1871) were prolific poets of the mid-nineteenth century. Born in rural Ohio, ambition brought them to New York City, where they became influential figures in the literary community. Each published volumes of their own work and contributed regularly to national periodicals. The sisters hosted a popular salon in their New York City home in which intellectuals, artists and social reformers of the day would gather. Pictured here is a posthumously published volume of their poetry, The Last Poems of Alice and Phoebe Cary, released in 1873.

Civil War Biographies: Baker-Benson

BAKER, BENJAMIN F. (1842-1901). Private, 102nd New York Infantry Company C. A native of Long Island, New York, Baker enlisted as a private and mustered into his company on December 4, 1861, at Camp Hillhouse, New York. On July 18, 1864, he was listed as absent for sickness. He was absent when his company mustered … Read more

Civil War Biographies: Berdan-Boesen

BERDAN, WILLIAM (1841-1900). Private, 9th New York Infantry, Company F. A native New Yorker, he enlisted there on April 23, 1861, as a private. On May 4, he mustered into the 9th New York Infantry where he served until he mustered out at New York City on May 20, 1863. He applied for a pension … Read more

Civil War Biographies: Boettner-Broas

BOETTNER (or BATTNER, BOETNER), GUSTAVE (or GUSTAV) A. (1843-1907). Private, Captain Kowald’s Independent Illinois Volunteers; sergeant, 134th Illinois Infantry, Company I. A resident of Chicago, Boettner first served in a company of Captain Kowald’s Independent Illinois Volunteers for three months in 1861. Subsequently, he re-enlisted as a private on May 11, 1864, mustered into the … Read more

Civil War Biographies: Brock-Caine

BROCK, THOMAS (1824-1885). Corporal, 173rd New York Infantry, Company A. Born in England, Brock enlisted at Brooklyn as a corporal on September 4, 1862, mustered into the 173rd New York on October 30, and mustered out on October 18, 1865, at Savannah, Georgia. Brock applied for and received an invalid pension in 1876, certificate 176,461, … Read more