SPADER, JEREMIAH V. (1830-1878). Captain, 29th New Jersey Infantry, Company I. A Brooklynite by birth, Spader enlisted as a captain on September 3, 1862, was commissioned into the 29th New Jersey three days later, and mustered out on June 30, 1863, at Freehold, New Jersey. He last lived in Montclair, New Jersey. Section ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­81, lot 3764.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPAULDING, JOSEPH C. (1842-1864). Unknown soldier history, Confederate States of America. A Confederate soldier, details of his service record are not known. On August 22, 1864, he died at Point Lookout, Maryland, of bilious fever. Section 166, lot 27246.

SPEAIGHT (or SPRAIGHT), WILLIAM A. (1826-1889). Captain, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company E. After enlisting as a captain at New York City on April 17, 1861, he was commissioned into the 7th Regiment on April 26, and mustered out at New York City on June 3. When his regiment was reactivated in 1862, and part of the New York State National Guard, he was commissioned on May 25, and mustered out at New York City on September 5.

The New York City Directory of 1877 indicates that Speaight was in the blankbook business (ledgers, journals and other blank-paged books). According to his obituary in the New York Herald, he was a member of Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R. and the Veteran Association of the 7th Regiment; members of both groups were invited to attend his funeral. He last resided at 93 Wilson Street, Brooklyn. Sarah A. Speaight, who is interred with him, applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1891, certificate 424,354. Section 79, lot 10607.

 

 

 

SPECHT, HENRY (1834-1879). Private, 29th New York Infantry, Company F. Born in Alsace, France, Specht enlisted as a private on June 17, 1861, at New York City, and mustered into the 29th New York on that same date. On November 17, 1862, he was discharged for disability at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, Maryland. His last address was 64 Wooster Street in Manhattan. Section 188, lot 22781.

SPEIR, SAMUEL FLEET (1838-1895). Physician. A native of New York City, his father, Robert Speir, was a noted, wealthy merchant and his mother, Hannah Fleet Speir, descended from one of the first families that settled in Northport, Long Island, in 1650. Educated at the Polytechnic Institute and by private tutors, he graduated from the Medical Department of the University of New York in 1860 with high honors, then studied in Europe.

Spier introduced the use of plaster of paris splints in the Union Army in 1862. He chartered two boats, at the request of the Sanitary Commission, and together with three assistants, went to the front lines of the Army of the Potomac to demonstrate their use. He received the thanks of the Commission, an agency that provided for improved medical and social needs of soldiers.

In 1864, Spier was appointed surgeon of the Brooklyn Eye and Ear Infirmary. He was renowned in his field for his publications and work in surgery, oncology and pathology. Active in charitable work, he established the Helping Hand Dispensary and a seaside sanitarium for children in Coney Island where he served as a consulting physician. A member of numerous medical societies including the New York State Medical Society, the New York Academy of Medicine, the Kings County Medical Society and the New York Pathological Society, he was invited to attend the prestigious International Medical Congress at Philadelphia in 1876.

Speir founded the Robins Island Club, a resort for men of which he was president and was a member of the Hamilton, Brooklyn, and Crescent Clubs. In eulogizing him, a colleague noted, “…Few physicians have carried more hope and comfort to their patients than he….” According to his obituary in The New York Times, he had a collection of exotic plants at his Bensonhurst house and had one of the finest kennels in the country; many of his dogs were awarded prizes at shows. He had a house in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, overlooking Gravesend Bay, and had his office at 162 Montague Street in Brooklyn. Section 165, lot 26697.

SPENCER, HIRAM P. (1826-1910). Corporal, 3rd Connecticut Light Artillery; private, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, Company B. On May 22, 1861, Spencer, a resident of Derby, Connecticut, enlisted as a private and mustered immediately into the 1st Connecticut. He mustered out on May 21, 1864. A few months later, then a resident of Naugatuck, Connecticut, he re-enlisted as a corporal and mustered into the 3rd Connecticut Light Artillery (company unknown) on September 9, 1864. He was promoted to sergeant on March 1, 1865. He mustered out at Virginia on June 23, 1865.

In 1892, his application for an invalid pension was approved under certificate 853,288. Spencer’s pension index also notes service in Company B of the 4th Connecticut Infantry. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Standard Union, he worked for many years for the Ansonia Clock Company. His last address was 558 11th Street in Brooklyn. Section 122, lot 17806, grave 403.

 

 

 

SPENCER, WILLIAM W. (1841-1914). Captain, 20th Connecticut Infantry, Companies A, D, and B. A New Yorker by birth, Spencer lived in Cheshire, Connecticut, when he enlisted as a sergeant on July 29, 1862. He mustered into Company A of the 20th Connecticut on September 8, and was simultaneously promoted to second lieutenant and commissioned into Company D of the regiment on June 6, 1863. Spencer was promoted to first lieutenant and transferred to Company B on April 21, 1864. Although he was promoted to captain on June 6, 1865, he never mustered in at that rank. He mustered out on June 13, 1865, at Fort Lincoln in Washington, D.C.

In 1905, Spencer’s application for a pension was approved under certificate 1,072,802. As per his obituary in the New York Herald, which confirms his Civil War service, he was a member of the G.A.R. and the Royal Arcanum. He last lived at 41 East 22nd Street in Manhattan. Spencer died of nephritis. Section 119, lot 500.

SPERRY, ROBERT J. (1849-1893). Midshipman mate, United States Navy. Sperry enlisted as a midshipman mate in the United States Navy on September 8, 1862 (although another record states November 26), and was dishonorably discharged on January 8, 1863. He re-enlisted on January 18, 1864, and was honorably discharged on December 27, 1865. During his service, he was aboard the USS Saranac and the USS Wateree. Sperry was reappointed on April 18, 1866, and discharged on September 18, 1868.

Sperry’s original application for a Navy invalid pension in 1880 was rejected in 1883 because of his dishonorable discharge. In his application, Sperry cited deafness of right ear, rheumatism, catarrh, and laryngitis. In 1892, he received a pension because of “inability to earn and support by manual labor,” certificate 25,870. He last lived at 221 Fifth Avenue in Brooklyn. Francis Sperry, who is interred with him, applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 13,614. Section 35, lot 3049.

SPICER, JOHN W. (1831-1891). First sergeant, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company H. A native New Yorker, Spicer served as a first sergeant for 30 days in 1861 with the 7th Regiment. In 1891, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 328,348. As per his obituary in the New York Herald, he was a member of the Seventh Regiment Veteran Corps; his comrades were invited to attend his funeral. He last lived in Hinsdale, Massachusetts. Section 76, lot 11340.

First Sergeant John W. Spicer, in his 7th Regiment uniform. He served in Company H--the 8th company, alphabetically--which explains the 8 on his hat.

First Sergeant John W. Spicer, in his 7th Regiment uniform. He served in Company H–the 8th company, alphabetically–which explains the 8 on his hat.

SPIES, FRANCIS (1840-1893). Private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company K. Brooklyn-born, he served during the 7th Regiment’s activation of 30 days in 1861. A wealthy man, who according to the 1880 census, employed two cooks, a waiter, a laundress and a nurse at home, he studied with a banker, was associated with the firm of Marcial & Co. at 36 Broadway in Manhattan which he eventually bought, and conducted affairs with Central and South America. When he applied for a passport in 1891, he listed his profession as merchant and described himself as 5’10” tall with a high forehead, florid complexion, grey hair, blue eyes, Roman nose and pointed chin.

Spies served as consul general of Ecuador and at the time of his death was vice consul of Honduras, having dedicated the monument to Christopher Columbus at 59th Street and Eighth Avenue in Manhattan in 1892. At one time, he was president of a corporation that owned the Panama Star and Herald, a paper that wielded influence in South American affairs. He was a member of the Seventh Regiment Veteran Corps and the Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R. Also active in civic organizations, he belonged to the Down Town Club, the Democratic Club, the Produce Exchange, the Chamber of Commerce, the Maritime Exchange and the Tammany Hall General Committee.

His wife, Amelia, was the daughter of Christian Schwarzwaelder (see), the president of the Germania Bank, who upon his death gave her the bulk of his substantial fortune. An article in The New York Times, dated June 22, 1893, gave details of Spies’s death the previous day, a suicide in which he shot himself in the head with a revolver. His lawyer is quoted in The Times as saying that Spies suffered from sunstroke, a condition that first afflicted him during the Civil War and that he had been depressed. Spies was found dead in his bathroom by his servant who was with him shortly before the incident. A follow-up article on June 25 noted that many checks sent to his business from South America could not be cashed until his wife returned from her trip to Europe because no one had authority to endorse them. Section 141, lot 23547.

SPINNEY, JOSEPH (1805-1882). Acting master, United States Navy. Born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, he entered the merchant service at age fourteen. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, he was the captain of large steamers that sailed in the Southern trade. In that capacity, he was the commander of the first steamer that sailed from New York to Charleston, South Carolina. Spinney engaged in action in the Florida and Mexican Wars.

In 1861, Spinney was at the helm of the USS Satellite on July 12 when the vessel was commissioned at the New York Navy Yard. A day later, the Satellite headed for the Potomac region where it engaged in action for two years. On February 15, 1862, she assisted the Harriet Lane when that ship was disabled. That April, the Satellite was sent to Rappahannock where together with the Island Belle captured the Confederate sloop, Reindeer, and the schooners, Sarah Ann and Sabine. After repairs, she was sent to Fort Monroe, Virginia, and returned to Rappahannock that November. After capturing numerous Confederate schooners in the spring and summer of 1863, the Satellite was captured on August 12 while under the command of Lieutenant John Taylor Wood, a grandson of Zachary Taylor and nephew of Jefferson Davis. On August 28, the Satellite was scrapped to prevent its recapture by Union forces.

Spinney retired from the Navy after the War, and returned to Brooklyn. His obituary notes that his experience as a seaman served him well when his family was ship-wrecked off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, and that he could sail in heavy fog from New York to Charleston Harbor without dropping anchor. An active member of the Methodist Church, he last lived with his son-in-law at 62 Livingston Street in Brooklyn. Section 55, lot 13614.

SPINOLA, FRANCIS BARRETO (1821-1891). Brigadier general, United States Volunteers. Born in Old Field, near Stony Brook, Long Island, Spinola was educated at the Quaker Hill Academy in Dutchess County, New York. A lawyer, he moved to Brooklyn and became involved in local Democratic Party politics. After serving as an alderman from 1846 through 1847 and then from 1849 through 1853, he was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1855, was a state senator from 1858-61, and was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention in 1860.

When the Civil War broke out, Spinola was commissioner of New York Harbor. He actively recruited soldiers in New York, organized and headed four regiments of the “Empire” brigade. On October 2, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers “for meritorious conduct in recruiting and organizing a brigade of four regiments and accompanying them into the field.” During his service, he took command after Gettysburg and was wounded near Manassas Gap, Virginia, when he pursued General Robert E. Lee’s army from that site. He then led the Keystone Brigade, to which he gave the following address on May 28, 1863, upon his transfer to the Excelsior Brigade.

I avail myself of this opportunity of saying to the officers and men of the Keystone Brigade that the time has arrived for me to take my leave of you; and, as your term of service will soon expire, many of you, I presume, will abandon the scenes and excitement of the battle-field again to assume your usual pursuits of industry. In parting allow me to assure you that I entertain an exalted opinion of you both as officers and soldiers; and, in my official character, I thank you for the prompt and cheerful manner in which you have ever performed your arduous and dangerous duties,–and I shall always look back upon my association with you as among the pleasantest hours of my life. You were put under my command at a time when you were fresh from your native state, and, with a few exceptions, entirely unacquainted with the toils and dangers of war: you were placed in no “school of instruction” but marched directly to the front, where you have remained performing your duty in a manner reflecting great credit on yourself and great honor upon your State.

Your march from Suffolk, Va., to Newbern, N.C., has no equal since the war began except in General Banks’ retreat from Winchester,–and that differed from yours in this important particular,–yours was forward of the enemy, his was from them. Your conduct at Mill Creek and White Oak River was equal to that of veteran troops: Your march to Pollocksville, for the purpose of encompassing the enemy at the second battle of Newbern, developed your powers of endurance, and, at once, gave you a prominent place among the best troops in this service.

While aboard transport in front of the Rebel batteries on the Pamplico River you were both willing and anxious to incur any risk, or to encounter any danger necessary to relieve the beleaguered city of Washington, N.C., and no troops in the army could have manifested greater willingness to make any necessary sacrifice to reinforce the garrison and to relieve it from the perils which surrounded it; but authority higher than either you or me checked your patriotic desires.

Your conduct at Blount’s Creek fully developed your impetuous desires to encounter the enemy, and no soldier ever retired from the battle-field with greater reluctance, after it had been demonstrated that the column could not advance owing to the destruction of the bridges which crossed the stream.

Your reconnaissance to “New Hope School House” was all that could have been asked of any troops; it was a success in every particular.

Your march to, and occupancy of Swift Creek Village, with its accompanying sharp skirmishing, as you approached the place and drove the Rebels from its precipitate flight, at the dead hour of night, were worthy of the “Old Guard” of Napoleon.

Your conduct throughout has been of a character that has placed the Brigade in an enviable position: intemperance and immoral practices, as well as vice in its many forms, have been strangers to the Officers and Soldiers of the Keystone Brigade. Instead of participating and indulging in the practices which are so prevalent and demoralizing among soldiers, have invariably been found on the Sabbath day joining with each other in prayer and uniting your voices in singing praises to the Great Ruler of all.

No cause can fail my Countrymen, when supported by such men as constitute the Keystone Brigade: You have done your whole duty to your Country, to your State, and to your families, in a manner that no man among you need be ashamed to acknowledge that he is one of the Keystone Brigade,–while the authorities of your State can, with pride, point to you as an emulation for others who are to follow you to the field!

We are all called upon to make some sacrifices in times like the present, but the American, who would not obey the call of his Country in her hour of peril, is unworthy of enjoying the benefits and blessings of a free government, which cost many lives and much treasure to establish. No army ever suffered like that of Washington! No men ever bore their sufferings with less murmuring than the brave patriots who pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honors, that you and I might enjoy civil and religious liberty! You need go no further than your own home to find the spot that gave shelter to the Father of his Country, together with the eleven thousand famishing patriots who wintered at Valley Forge, to which place they were traced by the blood which oozed from their unshod feet!

At the expiration of you term of service it is fair to presume that many of you, from age and other causes, will not again enter it; but, in the name of Liberty and a bleeding Country, I not only appeal to the young men of the Brigade to enlist again, but, I implore you, in the name of the men who suffered every conceivable hardship and privation in order to show to the despots of the world that man is capable of self government, that you will prove yourself the proud representatives of the patriots of ’76, and never quit the field until this diabolical attempt, to destroy the government which Washington and his associates gave us, has been ploughed out by the roots.

Spinola was wounded in the right foot and abdomen at the Battle of Wapping Heights, Virginia, on July 23, 1863, an assault in which dozens of his men were injured and 18 men and two officers were killed. After returning to Brooklyn for treatment, he was on recruiting duty from October through January 1864. However, his military career was marred by scandal when he was relieved of field duty and recruitment responsibilities and was court-martialed on charges of corruption with bounty agents. His name was also mentioned in an article about the court-martial of Joseph Kerrigan (see), an examining physician whose office was next to Spinola’s recruiting station at Lafayette Hall in New York City. In that case, he was involved in a scheme to recruit unfit soldiers. That piece noted that officers on Spinola’s failed expedition to Washington, North Carolina, considered him to be a coward and an utter fool. Ultimately, although sentenced to dismissal, Spinola was allowed to resign on June 8, 1865. In August 1865, he was honorably discharged. According to Jack D. Welsh, M.D., in Medical Histories of Union Generals (1996, pp. 315-316), Spinola suffered from arthritis throughout his life that dated from his discharge and pain in his right shoulder that impeded movement as a result of a fall from his horse at New Bern, North Carolina.

After the Civil War, Spinola went back to New York and returned to a career in business and political life. Active in the Italian-American community, he was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1877, 1881, and 1883. He was the first Italian-American elected to the United States Congress, serving the 10th District beginning in 1886 until his death in 1891. In the House of Representatives, he was a member of the committees on military affairs and War claims. He last lived in Westminster, New York, but died in Washington, D.C. His funeral was held at the Immaculate Conception Church. His estate, valued at over $1,000,000 in 1897 (the equivalent of $30 million in 2018), was left to his widow and a nephew, Ferdinand McKee. After his widow died in 1896, his sister, Annie Douglass, contested the will. Section 105, lot 1231.

spinola

SPITICCHI (or SPEDICK), RAPHAEL (or RAFFAELY, RAFFAEL) (1833-1893). Bandleader, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia; 4th Regiment, United States Artillery, Band Company. Spiticchi was born in Messina, Sicily, where his father was a well-to-do port inspector. As per the records of a descendant, Raphael and his two brothers, Carlos and Pietro, attended a music conservatory in Italy; family lore has it that students at the school played for the king. Pietro and Raphael Spiticchi signed on as sailors for their voyage to America in 1849; Carlo came to the United States in 1856 and joined his brothers in the service of the United States military. Military records show that Raphael and his brothers were musicians during their service. Raphael Spiticchi first served as a musician on the USS Constitution with the United Sates Navy after enrolling at Messina in Sicily from August 10, 1849 through January 23, 1851; he was discharged as a second class musician. He is listed as a musician living in Brooklyn on the 1855 New York State census. He was then a corporal and musician with the 4th Regiment, United States Artillery Band from March 4, 1851 through January 4, 1856, at Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, and then was promoted to sergeant and sent to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, from January 4, 1856 through November 24, 1860; he was discharged at Fort Randall, South Dakota.

During the Civil War, Spiticchi first served as a bandleader with the 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, from May 5, 1861 through August 6, 1861. As of August 27, 1861 through July 18, 1864, he was bandleader and bandmaster of the 4th Regiment, United States Artillery Band at Fort McHenry, Maryland; the 4th was also at Fort Monroe, Virginia, and Fort Washington, Maryland. Spiticchi was listed during that enrollment as being with his unit at Newton, Massachusetts; he was paid $325 by the state on July 18. Subsequently, he enrolled in the 4th Regiment, United States Artillery Band, on July 19, 1864, and was discharged at Maryland on March 28, 1867. His records for that enlistment indicate that he was a musician who was 5′ 6½” tall with brown eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion. At the time of his discharge as a private, military bands were abolished. As per his descendant, Raphael Spiticchi could play all of the band instruments except for the piano; he wrote music for that.

On July 5, 1868, Spiticchi married Ella Shute in Brooklyn; his marriage certificate states that he was a musician. He enlisted as a second class musician at the USS Vermont Naval Rendezvous on September 18, 1868 and was discharged on December 14, 1868. He re-enlisted at the USS Vermont as a first class musician on March 14, 1870 and was discharged on March 13, 1871, at a receiving ship at New York City. He re-enlisted every year as a first class musician at the USS Vermont in March of 1872, 1873 and 1874 serving until June 30, 1874. The 1874 Brooklyn Directory lists him as a musician. Subsequently, Spiticchi was a bugler as of July 1, 1874 through May 31, 1875, when he was discharged. He re-enlisted the next day as a bugler on the USS Vermont until September 30 and then served on the USS Minnesota from October 1, 1875 through June 11, 1876. He re-enlisted on the USS Minnesota the next day as a second class musician and was discharged on July 7, 1876. He then enlisted as a landsman on July 19, 1878, and was discharged on August 31, 1878. He last served as a landsman on the USS Minnesota from November 27, 1878 through June 30, 1879. According to the 1880 census, which used the surname of Spedick (an Americanization that the family used), he lived at 107 Hall Street in Brooklyn with his wife and six children and worked as a musician. The 1888-1890 Brooklyn Directory identifies him as a musician.

Spiticchi applied for a pension from the Navy but the commissioner wrote to him on March 31, 1887, that his petition had been disallowed because he did not serve an aggregate of ten years; this was disputed in a letter on July 2, 1891, outlining all of his service but there is no evidence that a pension was received. In 1890, Spiticchi’s application for an invalid pension for his service in the United States Army, citing varicose veins, asthma, rheumatism and general debility, was notarized in Brooklyn; that document only specified his last enlistment on July 19, 1864 and was approved under certificate 677,395. His pension index card has the notation-See Navy Special Order 10679 filed November 18, 1885.

As per the 1892 New York State census, Spiticchi was living with Brooklyn with his wife and five children; still working as a musician, he was identified as a citizen on that document. At the time of his death, he was married and lived at 107 Hall Street in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to heart disease. Shortly after his death, Ella Spiticchi applied for and was granted a widow’s pension, certificate 398,968. Section 127, lot 3139.

Raphael Spiticchi with wife, Ella Shute Spiticchi, and family.

 

SPONBERG (or SPONGBERG, SPANGBURG), CHARLES (?-1863). Acting third assistant engineer, United States Navy. Born Carl Magnus Spangburg, he is memorialized on his monument at Green-Wood and borne on the Navy’s rolls as Charles Sponberg. He began his service in the Navy as an acting third assistant engineer of April 28, 1863. As per his mother’s pension application, he was first assigned to the USS Mercedita, from which he was transferred to the USS Weehawken on August 15.

Sponberg drowned on December 6, 1863, when the USS Weehawken was lost at sea. The vessel, an iron-clad monitor, was commissioned at Jersey City, New Jersey, in mid-January 1863. Originally at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, on April 7, 1863, the Weehawken was struck by over 50 enemy cannon balls. After repairs, she was in the waters off Georgia and on June 17, 1863, captured the CSS Atlanta as well as two Confederate officers who would one day be interred at Green-Wood: Major Reid Sanders (see) and Second Assistant Engineer Leslie King (see). Returning to Charleston, South Carolina, the Weehawken assisted in the bombardments of Forts Wagner and Sumter. After being grounded on September 7, she was repaired and became part of the blockade off Charleston that October. The Weehawken, whose officers and crew were mostly from Brooklyn, suddenly sunk in a gale while at anchor off Charleston on December 6. Four engineers who couldn’t escape the flood and 27 other crewmen perished. The Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported on this tragedy on December 12:

…That poor Monitor fleet, which went forth with colors flying, carrying the hopes of the nation with it, has met disaster at every turn, encountered obstacles and sustained repulse, been battered and bruised, and finally settled down at anchorage not far from Morris Island. Even here it has been pursued, and the winds of Heaven with the waves of the ocean have destroyed and pushed down from sight, one of its best and strongest, and most vaunted components.

There was much speculation as to the cause of the Weehawken’s sinking. One admiral attributed it to damage suffered while aground under fire of the Sullivan Island batteries that strained the rivets on its bottom plates. John Ericcson, who pioneered ironclad construction, attributed the sinking to water entering the anchor hoister hatch after it had been accidentally left open by a crew member. Ultimately, the inquiry concluded that a heavy load of ammunition, open hatches and a failure to level the ship after it had taken on water caused the sinking.

In 1866, Anna Sophia Spangburg, the mother of Carl (or Charles) applied for a pension from the Navy based on her son’s service and death. A letter in support of her application from the Legation of Sweden and Norway stated that Mrs. Spangburg was a Swedish citizen and that Carl was her only child. However, the pension request was denied on the grounds that her husband was “not physically incapable of supporting his wife.” Although crews attempted to bring up the Weehawken as early as December 1863, it took eight years before the ship and her crew members who perished there were brought back up. The remains of the men were then recovered and given proper burial.

The funeral ceremony was detailed in an article in The New York Times on September 27, 1871. As per that account, the pageant began at the Brooklyn Navy Yard when a small box, containing the bones of the four deceased men, was deposited into a beautiful rosewood casket decorated with silver. A large silver plate which was placed upon the casket read, “This coffin contains the remains of four officers of the United States Navy, attached to the Weehawken, which foundered off Charleston, S.C., Dec. 6, 1863: H. W. MERIDEN (sic), Third Assistant Engineer; AUGUSTUS MITCHELL, Third Assistant Engineer; GEORGE W. MCGOWAN, Acting Third Assistant Engineer; and CHARLES SPONBERG, Acting Third Assistant Engineer.” The funeral procession began at noon with a detachment from the Vermont playing Auld Lang Syne. The cortege was led by the Band, followed by a detachment of Marines, sailors from the Man-of-War, the casket flanked by pall-bearers, a delegation from the Freemasons, and friends and relatives. The detachment of marines fired the customary funeral volleys at the gravesite. The Times noted that rain fell during the cortege and graveside ceremony adding a note of solemnity to the occasion.

Henry Merian (see), Augustus Mitchell (see), George N. McGowan and Charles Sponberg are remembered in a monument at Green-Wood erected in 1871 and dedicated to their valiant efforts. The monument has a carving on its front that states it was erected by Frances Mitchell, who purchased the lot and is likely the mother of Augustus Mitchell and J. J. Merian, likely the father of Henry Merian. On one side the inscription reads: “SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF FOUR OFFICERS OF THE U.S. NAVY WHO LOST THEIR LIVES BY BEING DROWNED ON THE U.S. MONITOR WEEHAWKEN TO WHICH THEY WERE ATTACHED WHEN SHE FOUNDERED OFF CHARLESTON, S. C. DECEMBER 6, 1863.” The opposite side of the monument is inscribed: , “THE REMAINS WERE EXHUMED FROM THE ENGINE ROOM OF THE WRECKED MONITOR WHERE THEY NOBLY FELL AT THEIR POST OF DUTY. SEPTEMBER 26, 1871. Section 82, lot 20207.

Engraving depicts the smokestack top of the sunken USS Weehawken shortly after she foundered off Charleston, South Carolina.

SPOONER, EDWARD H. (1838-1888). Private, 3rd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery, Company D. Originally from New York, Spooner was a teacher and resident of South Boston, Massachusetts, when he enlisted as a private on July 30, 1863. He mustered into the 3rd Massachusetts Heavy Artillery on August 14, and mustered out on May 17, 1865. He last lived in North Plainfield, New Jersey. His death was caused by pneumonia. Section 138, lot 26097.

SPOONER, JR., EDWIN B. (1834-1901). First sergeant, 48th New York Infantry, Companies B and A; unknown rank, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company G. After enlisting on April 23, 1861, Spooner mustered into the 13th Regiment and mustered out with his company on August 6, 1861. He re-enlisted as a first sergeant at Brooklyn on August 28, 1861, mustered into Company B of 48th New York on September 5, transferred to Company A on an unknown date, and was discharged for disability on April 16, 1862.

According to the Brooklyn Directory for 1867, Spooner worked as a printer; in 1881, he worked in circular delivery; and in 1882, was a printer. His military service was confirmed in the 1890 Veterans Census. He last resided at 174 Franklin Avenue in Brooklyn. Spooner died of a fracture and shock. In 1908, his wife’s application for a widow’s pension was approved, certificate 749,598. Section 111, lot 123, grave 6.

SPOWERS, JOHN JESSE (1840-1917). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company E; 5th Veteran New York Infantry, Company H. Enlisting as a private on August 25, 1862, at Brooklyn, Spowers mustered into the 14th Brooklyn that day. He was reported as missing at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 1, 1863, and returned November 5, 1863. On June 2, 1864, he was transferred into Company H of the 5th Veterans, and on that date became a prisoner of war at Bethesda Church, Virginia. He was paroled December 13, 1864, at Charleston, South Carolina. On June 19, 1865, he was discharged at Camp Parole in Annapolis, Maryland. He applied for a pension in 1912 that was granted under certificate 1,171,465. Spowers last lived at 101 Pierrepont Street in Brooklyn. Section 185, lot 31987.

SPRAGUE, GEORGE (1845-1931). Coal heaver, United States Navy. Sprague was born in New York; one document says Poughkeepsie, New York, although his obituary says Manhattan. During the Civil War, Sprague enlisted on April 12, 1863, and served in the United States Navy aboard the gunboat Campus. He later served as a coal heaver aboard the USS Cactus, USS North Carolina and the USS Vermont before his discharge on April 12, 1865, at Norfolk, Virginia.

Subsequently, Sprague spent many years working as a fireman for New York City’s Fire Department. He retired from Engine Company 153, after twenty-five years with that company on April 3, 1910. He was also active in community organizations including the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion and the Freemasons. At the time of his pension application in 1912, he was 5′ 5½” tall with a light complexion, hazel eyes, brown hair and was working as a printer. At that time, he lived at 361 49th Street in Brooklyn. His pension, issued in 1913, was $16 per month; it was increased to $100 a month in 1930. He died from heart disease.

As per his obituary in the Long Islander (Huntington), which confirms his Civil War service, Sprague’s funeral included military and Masonic rites. The military funeral was conducted by the Nathan Hale Post, Veterans of Foreign Wars and the Huntington Post, American Legion; the Masonic lodge of Huntington conducted rites on behalf of the Seawanhaka Lodge of Brooklyn where Sprague was a life member. Sprague last resided with his brother at 144 New York Avenue in Huntington, Long Island. Section 2, lot 5499.

 

SPRAGUE, HORACE A. (1819-1875). Captain, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia Heavy Artillery, Company B. In February of 1857, Sprague was a member of Company B of the 13th New York State National Guard Regiment of the Coast Artillery from Brooklyn when he was honored with the presentation of a German-imported foot officer’s presentation sword. During the Civil War, he enlisted at Brooklyn as a captain on April 23, 1861, was commissioned into Company B of 13th New York State Militia three days later, and mustered out on August 6, 1861. A year later, Sprague served in the same regiment and company as a captain on May 28, 1862, and mustering out three months later on September 12 at Brooklyn.

He last resided at 64 Henry Street in Brooklyn; his occupation was listed as “gentleman.” Susanna M. Sprague applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1891, certificate 385,525. In 2018, the aforementioned presentation sword, embellished with detailed floral engravings and German-silver grips, and the sharkskin scabbard, was offered for sale at the Horse Soldier, a store specializing in military memorabilia. Section 33, lot 4137.

SPROULL, JAMES A. (1826-1906). Captain, 174th New York Infantry, Company F. Sproull enlisted as a captain on October 30, 1862, at New York City, and mustered into the 174th on November 5. He was wounded at Donaldson, Louisiana, on July 13, 1863, and was discharged at Franklin, Tennessee, on February 17, 1864.

As per his obituary in the New York Herald, Sproull was a member of the Veteran Association of the 71st New York National Guard, the Mead Post #7 of the G.A.R. and the Freemasons; members of the organizations were invited to attend his funeral. (It is not clear when he served in the 71st National Guard.) He died in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Section 83, lot 1419.

 

 

 

SQUIRES, EDWIN HATFIELD (1842-1921). First lieutenant, 102nd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company H; private, 71st Regiment, New York State Militia, Companies B and E. Born in Danville, New York, Squires served as a private for three months in the 71st Regiment’s State Militia assigned to Company B in 1861, and to Company E in 1862, when the unit was part of the New York State National Guard. In 1864, he enlisted as a first lieutenant on August 8 at New York City, was commissioned into the 102nd Regiment on August 25, served for 100 days, and mustered out at New York City on November 13.

The New York City Directory for 1877 lists Squires as a machinist. In 1891, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 949,669. His obituary in the Brooklyn Standard Union, which confirms his Civil War service, reports that he was a retired mechanical engineer and that he was a member of the Abel Smith Post #435 of the G.A.R. His last residence was 776 Halsey Street in Brooklyn. Cecilia Squires applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1923, certificate 913,099. Section 81, lot 3903.

 

 

 

SQUIRES, WILLIAM JAMES (1841-1923). First lieutenant, United States Marines. Squires, who was born in Manhattan, rose through the ranks during his military service, from second lieutenant on November 25, 1861, to first lieutenant the next day, and finally to captain, on August 24, 1867. He resigned on January 12, 1870. A builder, he lived in Brooklyn for 60 years and last resided at 353 Stuyvesant Avenue. Section 124, lot 35251, grave 2.

STACK, JOHN (1833-1892). Private, 63rd New York Infantry, Company C. Of English birth, he enlisted and mustered into the 63rd New York as a private at New York City on August 21, 1861, and deserted on January 24, 1863, at Falmouth, Virginia. He last lived in Brooklyn. Section 189, lot 16898.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STAFFORD, FREDERICK H. (1841-1920). Captain, 139th New York Infantry, Companies F and G; private, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company D. Born in New York City, Stafford enlisted as a private in 1861 and served for three months with the 13th Regiment. After re-enlisting as a first lieutenant on an unknown date, he was commissioned into Company F of the 139th New York where he was promoted to captain at some point before his discharge from Company G. Further details of his service in the 139th are unknown. His pension record indicates that he also served in the United States General Service. In 1891, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 877,113. His last residence was 1227 M Street, Washington, D.C. Section 145, lot 24060, grave 3.

STAGMAIER (or STAYMAIER), JOHAN (or JOHANN) G. (1834-1918). Private, 173rd New York Infantry, Company E. Stagmaier enlisted at Brooklyn as a private on September 2, 1862, and mustered into the 173rd New York on October 30. He was taken as a prisoner of war at Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, on April 9, 1864, and was paroled on May 27, 1865. Stagmaier was discharged on July 8, 1865, at New York City. In 1890, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 781,537. Shortly after his death in 1918, his wife applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 851,744. Section 135, lot 27263.

STAHL, ADOLPH (1842-1895). Private, 119th New York Infantry, Company B; 7th New York Veteran Infantry, Company C. A native of Germany, he enlisted at New York City on June 28, 1862, mustered into the 119th New York on September 4, and was discharged on May 11, 1864, at New York City. Stahl re-enlisted on May 25, 1864, mustered into the 7th New York Veterans on June 4, was hospitalized at some point during his service at Point Lookout, Maryland, and was absent when his company mustered out on August 4, 1865, at Hart’s Island, New York Harbor. Stahl’s last residence was 414 Hudson Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 138, lot 27682.

STAHL, JOSEPH C. (1840-1934). Private, 176th New York Infantry, Company F. He enlisted at New York City on September 25, 1863, mustered into Company F, and was discharged for disability on March 21, 1865, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He died at age 93 at his home at 7648 85th Drive in Woodhaven, Queens. Section 145, lot 25560, grave 3.

STAMM, HENRY (1846-1941). Private, 2nd New Jersey Cavalry, Companies B and G. Stamm, who was born in Switzerland, came to the United States when he was 16 years old. According to his obituary in The New York Times, he was visiting friends in New Jersey a month after arriving in the U.S. when he entered military service. After enlisting as a private on September 7, 1864, he immediately mustered into the 2nd New Jersey Cavalry, transferred to Company G on an unspecified date, and mustered out at Vicksburg, Mississippi, on June 29, 1865. He saw action in the engagements along the Mississippi River and was twice wounded in action.

After the War, Stamm was a painter at the Brooklyn Navy Yard working there until he was 75. A member of the Rankin Post #10 of the G.A.R., he was also the chairman of the Memorial and Executive Committee of the Brooklyn G.A.R. Stamm was the last surviving member of his regiment and of his G.A.R. Post when he died at the age of 94. He last lived at 1879 Palmetto Street in Ridgewood, Queens. Section 127, lot 8899.

 

 

 

 

STANBURY, ANDREW M. (1845-1895). Musician, 127th New York, Companies C and B. A native of New York, Stanbury enlisted as a private on August 22, 1862, and mustered into Company C of the 127th New York on September 8. Promoted to musician and transferred to Company B on October 1, 1862, he remained with the regiment until it mustered out on June 30, 1865, at Charleston, South Carolina. According to the census for 1880, he was a Custom’s House clerk at that time. He last lived in Wakefield, New York. Section 2, lot 5499, grave 1416.

STANDISH, HENRY J. (1834-1891). First lieutenant, 2nd New York Heavy Artillery, Company L (34th New York Light Artillery). Standish, who was born in New York State, enlisted at Flushing, Queens, as a second lieutenant on September 24, 1861, and was commissioned into Company L of the 2nd New York Heavy Artillery on October 1. On October 16, he was commissioned into the 34th Light Artillery (the designation of Company L of the 2nd Heavy Artillery). He was promoted to first lieutenant on or about January 17, 1862, and resigned on October 25, 1862. His last residence was 675 Avenue E in Bayonne, New Jersey. Section 183, lot 19897.

STANG, FREDERICK (or FRIEDRICH) (1825-1897). Private, 7th New York Infantry, Company E. Serving just one month, Stang enlisted and mustered in on July 5, 1861, at New York City, and was honorably discharged for disability on August 5 at Newport News, Virginia. On November 22, 1937, Mrs. E. Stang Voss, applied to the War Department for a government-issued gravestone, citing Stang’s service in the Civil War. That application indicated that he also used the name Gustave Frederick Stang. Section 206, lot 21347, grave 692.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANLEY, CLARENCE (1842-1903). First sergeant, 56th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company I; private, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company G. A Brooklyn native, Stanley served three months in 1861 in the 13th New York State Militia’s Company G. He enlisted and mustered into the same regiment and company at Brooklyn on May 28, 1862, served with the Heavy Artillery, and mustered out after three months on September 12. He served as a first sergeant for 30 days with the 56th Regiment, New York National Guard, in 1863. His last residence was 11 New York Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 25, lot 7305, grave 6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STANLEY, HARRY (1843-?). Drummer, 87th New York Infantry, Company K. A native New Yorker, Stanley enlisted as a drummer on August 11, 1861, served with the 87th, and mustered out for disability on July 9, 1864, at Augur General Hospital in Washington, D.C. He belonged to the Henry M. Lee Post #21 of the G.A.R. from 1871-1873. Section ?, lot ?.

STANLEY, JAMES (1839-1900). Captain, United States Navy. Born in England, he first served in the Crimean War taking part in the Battle of Sebastopol and the occupation of that city. Stanley was awarded the Sebastopol Medal which was given by the British government to the survivors of that attack. He then immigrated to the United States.

In 1862, Stanley joined the United States Navy as a captain and was assigned to the USS Monitor Squadron on both the Mississippi and James Rivers. He was discharged from the Navy in 1865 whereupon he remained active in veterans’ organizations. He was twice captain of the Monitor Association of Naval War Veterans. He was also a member of the Brooklyn War Veterans and Sons and was commander of the Coeur-de-Lion Commandery of the Knights of Saint John of Malta. In civilian life, he was a shore inspector for the Health Board. He last lived at 1045 Third Avenue, Brooklyn. Stanley succumbed to consumption. Section 134, lot 29725, grave 76.

 

 

 

STANLEY, JAMES (1844-1884). Landsman, United States Navy. Originally from Ireland, Stanley enlisted in the United States Navy on November 18, 1859, and was assigned to the USS Roanoke in the Home Squadron, serving until May 29, 1860. He re-enlisted as a landsman on April 29, 1861, and was assigned to the USS Huntsville from May 1861, though April 5, 1862, at which time he was transferred to the USS Connecticut at Key West, Florida. Stanley was transferred to the USS Pocahontas at Port Royal, South Carolina, from October 2, 1862, through July 1863, then served on the USS Monongahela as of September 30, 1863, through March 25, 1865. During that period, the Monongahela was dispatched to Texas and then took part in the Battle of Mobile Bay, Alabama, on August 5, 1864. On August 26, 1865, he was discharged at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After the Civil War, Stanley remained in the Navy, enlisting at New York on October 19, 1865, later serving in Europe from October 2, 1867, through March 1872, and was discharged on March 22, 1872. During his time in Europe, Stanley was on the USS Guerriere when the body of Admiral David Farragut, who led the fleet at Mobile Bay, was escorted back to New York for burial.

Although his widow, Ellen Stanley, applied for a pension from the Navy, application 26,996, it was denied because the records showed service subsequent to the Civil War. That record indicates that he was a 1st class painter and ordinary seaman aboard the USS Minnesota (1867), USS Guard (1867), USS Vermont (1867), USS Franklin (1868), USS Ticonderoga (1868-1869), and USS Plymouth (1869-1870). In her affidavit of August 21, 1908, Ms. Stanley claims that her husband’s discharge papers are lost but that the “Chief of Bureau” will send records to the commissioner of pensions. She confirmed his service on the USS Franklin, USS Minnesota, the USS Tyota, and the USS Plymouth but indicated that he served during Civil War from 1861-1865. She also attested that he died from consumption which he contracted while in service. According to a descendant, her attorney died and no appeal was made; the descendant hopes to correct the official record. He last lived in New York. Section A, lot 8998, grave 63.

 

STANTON, WILLIAM (1843-1927). Sergeant, 43rd Ohio Infantry, Company G. After enlisting as a private on September 3, 1862, he mustered immediately into the 43rd Ohio where he rose to corporal and sergeant before his discharge on March 11, 1863. Stanton resumed his military career on September 3, 1867, when he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 2nd United States Artillery. He became a first lieutenant on November 16, 1874, and transferred into the 6th United States Cavalry on February 9, 1877. He rose to captain on May 21, 1886, to major of the 8th United States Cavalry on June 9, 1899, and to lieutenant colonel of the 11th United States Cavalry on September 13, 1902. His last residence was on West 58th Street in Manhattan. Section 147, lot 21192.

 

 

 

 

 

STANWOOD, HENRY D. (1845-1899). Corporal, 44th Massachusetts Infantry, Company D. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, he enlisted there as a private, mustered into the 44th Massachusetts, and was promoted to corporal at some point before his discharge. After the War, he relocated to New York City where he was a businessman and then entered the United States Customs Service where he was employed for 27 years. Continuing his interest in military affairs, he was active in the National Guard serving at some point as adjutant of the 13th and 23rd Regiments, and adjutant general of the 5th Brigade. He was also a member of the G.A.R.’s Ulysses S. Grant Post #327 as of November 12, 1889. His last residence was 177 Congress Street in Brooklyn. Jane M. Stanwood, his widow, received a pension in 1908, certificate 661,548. Section 13, lot 12883, grave 4.

STARKEY, DAVID J. (1840-1875). Sergeant major, 13th New York Cavalry, Company I; 3rd New York Provisional Cavalry, Company E. Starkey, who was born in New York State, enlisted at New York City as a private on August 21, 1863. On November 24, 1863, he mustered into Company I of the 13th New York Cavalry the same day that he was promoted to command sergeant major of his company. On August 17, 1865, he transferred into the 3rd New York Provisional Cavalry from which he mustered out at Camp Barry, Washington, D.C., on September 21, 1865. His last residence was on East 46th Street in Manhattan. Section 117, lot 8412.

starrSTARR, GROSVENOR (1842-1862). First lieutenant and adjutant, 7th Connecticut Volunteer Infantry. Starr, who was born in New York City, enlisted as an adjutant in August 1861, served in the Field and Staff of the 7th Connecticut as of September 1861, and was promoted to first lieutenant and adjutant at some point. He died from typhoid fever at Tybee, Island, Georgia, on March 5, 1862.

At the outbreak of the War, Starr was a student at Yale, and upon his death was remembered fondly by his classmates in the Yale Literary Magazine, “He was a man honored for his eminent abilities as a scholar, being one of the first in his Class; respected for his uniform gentlemanly demeanor; loved as a friend for his social qualities, his warm-heartedness and devotion.” A classmate, writing of him in the Triennial Record in 1899, commented that he enlisted “from a clear conviction that he ought to go….His faithfulness and patriotism were fully recognized by his associates and his commander, General Terry, speaks of him in the highest terms. He met his death acting under this sense of duty.” Lt. Starr’s sack coat is housed in the collection of Don Troiani of Historical Art Prints, and the C. J. Daley Historical Reproductions Company stated in 2006 its intention to reproduce it for sale. Section 117, lot 90.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STARRETT, LYMAN M. (1832-1908). Shipbuilder. According to his obituary in The New York Times, Starrett was renowned as one of the original builders of the USS Monitor, the first ironclad. Among his other designs were the first printing press pattern-maker in the United States, and the first horse-drawn street sweeper. He was a member of the Veteran Volunteer Exempt Firemen’s Association of Woodhaven, Queens. He last lived in at 111 Elmwood Street in Brooklyn Manor. Section 199, lot 2337, grave 10.

STAUDER, GEORGE (1832-1875). Private, 34th New York Light Artillery. Of German origin, he enlisted as a private at Flushing, New York, on September 10, 1861, and mustered into an unknown company of the 34th New York on October 1. After re-enlisting on November 15, 1863, he served with the 34th until he mustered out on June 21, 1865, at Hart’s Island, New York Harbor. At the time of his death, he resided at 26 Third Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 15, lot 17263, grave 1027.

STEARNS, RAPHAEL C. (1838-1891). First lieutenant, 47th New York Infantry, Company I; 47th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company G; second lieutenant, 23rd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company I; third lieutenant, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company H. Stearns was 5′ 11″, with brown eyes, dark hair and fair complexion. He enlisted at Brooklyn as a second lieutenant on April 23, 1861, was commissioned into the 13th Regiment on May 17, and mustered out on August 6, 1861, at Brooklyn.

On September 1, 1861, Stearns re-enlisted as a first lieutenant and mustered into Company I of the 47th New York on September 14. On November 15, he allegedly – there is no official record – shot himself in the left calf by accident while cleaning his pistol in his cabin aboard the transport Roanoke anchored off Port Royal, South Carolina. He was treated on board ship, received a 30-day furlough on November 24 and returned to Brooklyn for further treatment, rejoining his regiment in January. He was discharged for disability on January 14, 1862, at Hilton Head, South Carolina, and received a letter of tribute from the men of the regiment citing “the many hours devoted to us, [your] gentlemanly manners, kind words, and ever-ready attention…”

Serving again the following year, Stearns re-enlisted at Brooklyn as a first lieutenant on May 27, 1862, served in Company G of the 47th Regiment’s National Guard, and mustered out on September 1, 1862, at Brooklyn. Stearns was commissioned into the 23rd National Guard on June 18, 1863, and mustered out after 30 days on July 22, 1863, at Brooklyn.

After the War, he was a merchant with Edward Scheitland & Co. at 75-77 Leonard Street in New York City. In 1872, he applied for an invalid pension; it was granted under certificate 127,655. He was active in the G.A.R and in 1884 was elected commander of Henry M. Lee Post #21. In July, 1885, one M. B. Rich wrote a letter to the Pension Bureau claiming that Stearns had shot himself on purpose to avoid combat, that he was a coward, and was only granted a pension as a political favor. There was an investigation, and the members of the post unanimously rose to his defense. The cowardice charge seems unlikely, given that he re-enlisted twice, and the Pension Bureau seems to have taken no further action. His last residence was 64 Keap Street, Brooklyn. Section 159, lot 16666.

STEBBINS, HENRY GEORGE (1811-1881). Congressman. According to his obituary in The New York Times, Stebbins was born in New York City; the Biographical Directory of Congress states that he was born in Ridgefield, Connecticut. Educated in private schools, his father directed him to study law but he abandoned his studies after an accidental head injury. Starting out as a clerk in a bank, he prospered and became a member of The Stock Exchange in 1833, was its president four times, and helped write its governance laws. In 1849, he was colonel of the 12th Regiment and engaged in putting down the Astor Place Riots. He was appointed park commissioner in 1859, serving until 1862, and became active in the Academy of Music where he was president in 1861.

A Democrat, Stebbins was elected to Congress and served from March 4, 1863-October 24, 1864. Stebbins was on the Ways and Means Committee and supported the financial position of the government and Secretary Chase. His constituents opposed his views and he resigned before the end of his term. In 1871, he was active in the movement to oust Boss Tweed, was reappointed president of the Park Commission in 1873, participated in the development of the railroad industry and was involved in the plans for the New York World’s Fair scheduled for 1883. Section 76, lot 104.

 

 

STEEL, JOHN G. (1837-1907). Rank unknown, 12th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company G. Originally from Scotland, Steel enlisted and served with the 12th Regiment although there are no specific details related to his service. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Freemasons. In civilian life, he was a tobacco merchant on Beekman and Nassau Streets in Manhattan. In 1901, he applied for and received a pension, certificate 1,071,099. His last residence was 678 Marcy Avenue in Brooklyn. Shortly after his death in 1907, Anna Steel applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 660,094. New York. Section 60, lot 3773.

STEGER, JOSEPH (1836-1906). Private, 52nd New York Infantry, Company G. After enlisting at his birthplace, New York City, on December 6, 1861, he immediately mustered into the 52nd New York. He was wounded on June 1, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and was discharged for disability on September 19 of that year at Baltimore, Maryland. Steger last lived in Manhattan. Section A, lot 8100, grave 847.

STEGNER, JOHN CHRISTIAN (1829-1891). Captain, 55th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company E. Born in France, he enlisted at New York City and was immediately commissioned into the 55th National Guard on June 24, 1863. He mustered out after 30 days at New York City on July 27. His last residence was 99 Thompson Street in Manhattan. Section 86, lot 2857, grave 23.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEIGER, VICTOR E. (1840-1922). Quartermaster and first lieutenant, 132nd New York Infantry; quartermaster, 28th Regiment, New York State Militia. Born in Switzerland, Steiger enlisted at Brooklyn as a quartermaster on April 23, 1861, was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 28th Regiment on May 11, and mustered out on August 5 at Brooklyn. Subsequently, he re-enlisted as a quartermaster and first lieutenant on June 11, 1862, at New York City, was commissioned into the 132nd New York on July 14, and was discharged on September 7, 1863. In 1907, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 1,138,938. He last lived on Congress Street in Brooklyn. Section 119, lot 133.

STEINDECKER, EDWARD (1844-1863). Private, 70th New York Infantry, Company D. After enlisting at Staten Island on June 1, 1861, the native New Yorker mustered into the 70th New York, part of Sickle’s Excelsior Brigade, on June 21, and was discharged for disability on June 4, 1863, at Falmouth, Virginia. He died of consumption at St. Luke’s Hospital in New York on October 19, 1863. A Veterans Administration stone was ordered for him early in the 20th century. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 75.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEINDECKER, NELSON (1841-1866). Corporal, 20th New York Infantry, Company B. A native New Yorker, Steindecker enlisted at New York City as a private on May 3, 1861, and mustered into his company three days later. On September 17, 1862, he was wounded at Antietam, Maryland. Subsequently, he was promoted to corporal on March 1, 1863, and mustered out on June 1 of that year at New York City. He last lived in New York City. Section B, lot 11005, grave 183.

STEINERT, GEORGE (1832-1891). Surgeon, 151st New York Infantry; assistant surgeon, 20th New York Infantry; 52nd New York Infantry. Of German birth, he enlisted at Albany, New York, on August 18, 1862, as an assistant surgeon, was commissioned into the 20th New York’s Field and Staff that day, and mustered out on June 1, 1863, at New York City. He re-enlisted on July 7, 1863, at Bealton, Virginia, and was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 151st New York on July 30. During his service, he was promoted to surgeon on March 14, 1865, but did not muster in at that rank. He joined the 52nd New York as an assistant surgeon on March 22, 1865, and mustered out three months later on June 26 at Washington, D.C. Steinert is listed as a physician in the New York City Directory of 1877. He died in Hartford, Connecticut, but last lived at 732 East 134th Street in New York City. Section 13, lot 9358.

STEINMACHER, FREDERICK (1822-1863). Sergeant major, 59th New York Infantry, Company C. On August 2, 1861, he enlisted at New York City and mustered into the 59th New York as first sergeant on August 20. He was reduced to private on November 15, 1862, and was later promoted to sergeant major and transferred to the Field and Staff on January 11, 1863. Wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 3, 1863, his arm was amputated, and he died days later on July 12. There is a memorial stone on his gravesite. Section 185, lot 23214.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEINWAY, ALBERT (1840-1877). Brigadier general; first lieutenant, 5th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company B; private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. Born in Germany into the world-famous Steinway family that continues to manufacture pianos in New York City, he first served for 30 days in the 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, in 1861. He re-enlisted on June 19, 1863, as a first lieutenant, was commissioned into the 5th Regiment, also known as the Jefferson Guard, on July 3, and mustered out on July 22. Later in the conflict he rose in rank and became a brigadier general on the staff of Governor John T. Hoffman.

Steinway was active in the military after the Civil War serving as a lieutenant colonel in the 96th Regiment in September 1867, rose to colonel of the 6th Regiment on July 7, 1868, and was commissary general of subsistence in 1872 on the staff of the governor of New York. At the time of his death, he was the youngest member of his family firm, Steinway and Sons. Eight foremen of the company served as pallbearers at his funeral. His last residence was in New York City. Section 46, lot 15388.

 

 

STEINWAY, CHARLES G. (1830-1865). Paymaster, 5th Regiment, New York State Militia. Of German birth, his family manufactured world-famous pianos. He enlisted at New York City on April 19, 1861, was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 5th Regiment, also known as the Jefferson Guard on July 1, 1861, and mustered out on August 7, 1861. He died of typhus fever at the family home in Brunswick, Germany, and was interred at Green-Wood on March 29, 1866. Section 46, lot 15388.

Charles G. Steinway

STEMMER, FRANZ (or FRANK) (1833-1915). Private, 173rd New York Infantry, Company H. Stemmer was born in Stuttgart, Germany. After enlisting at Brooklyn as a private on September 22, 1862, Stemmer mustered into the 173rd on October 30. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Standard Union, which confirms his service throughout the Civil War, he was wounded at the Battle of the Wilderness. He mustered out on October 18, 1865, at Savannah, Georgia. He last lived at 153 Saratoga Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 135, lot 27263.

STEPHENS, ANN SOPHIA (1810-1886). Author. As per her obituary, she was either born in Derby, Connecticut, or was brought there as a child from England. Her grandfather, Reverend William Winterbotham wrote a three-volume history of North America and a history of the Chinese Empire. Her husband, Edward Stephens, a printer, was a descendant of the settlers of Plymouth, Massachusetts. In 1834, her poetry was published in the Portland Magazine, a literary journal, which her husband published and she edited. After the magazine was sold in 1837, the Stephenses moved to New York City. She then edited numerous magazines including The Lady’s Companion, Petersen’s Magazine, The Gazette of Fashion, and Mrs. Stephen’s Illustrated Monthly. After John Brown’s Raid, she wrote a reply to a letter written by Victor Hugo calling Brown a “champion of Christ” as incendiary and “blasphemy of a highly wrought imagination.”

During the Civil War, Stephens wrote and compiled A Pictorial History of the War for the Union. In addition, she chaired a committee that advocated rationing and modest living to support Union troops. Her son, Edward Stephens (see) fought in the 7th Regiment during the War. Stephens wrote many “dime” novels, the first written in 1860, and used the pseudonym Jonathan Slick in some of her literary work. Her estate, valued at $125,000 to $140,000, included a donation of portraits to the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The artwork included a portrait made for and once owned by Aaron Burr, a portrait and lock of hair belonging to Henry Clay, and two lockets containing hair of Presidents George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Section 48, lot 4919. 

STEPHENS, EDWARD (1845-1913). Private 7th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company G. A native of New York City, his mother, Ann S. Stephens (see), was a prominent author. Stephens enlisted at New York City as a private on May 25, 1862, served with the 7th Regiment, and mustered out with his company after three months on September 5 at New York City. His application for an invalid pension was granted in 1893, certificate 1,141,852.

In civilian life, Stephens practiced law in Washington, D..C., and in New York City. In 1900, he became a member of the Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R.; as per his obituary in the New York Herald, comrades were invited to his funeral. Stephens last resided at 203 West 70th Street in Manhattan. Section 48, lot 4919.

 

 

STEPHENSON, WESLEY C. (1839-1867). Private, 37th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company A. A New York City native, Stephenson enlisted there as a private on May 29, 1862, mustered immediately into the 37th Regiment, and mustered out after three months at New York City on September 2. His last residence was 323 East 23rd Street in Manhattan. Section 168, lot 17592.

stephensonSTEPHENSON, WILLIAM WILSON (1831-1889). Lieutenant colonel by brevet; major, 165th New York, Company C; private, 7th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company F. Stephenson enlisted at New York City as a private on May 25, 1862, mustered into the 7th Regiment on that date, and mustered out after three months on September 5 at New York City. On September 22, 1862, he was promoted to captain and commissioned into the 165th New York, and served in Virginia and Louisiana. He was appointed major on October 20, 1865, with rank from July 26, 1865, but did not muster in at that rank. At some point during the War, he served as an aide-de-camp on the staff of several officers. Stephenson mustered out at Charleston, South Carolina, on September 1, 1865. On May 9, 1866, he was brevetted lieutenant colonel by New York Volunteers “for gallant and meritorious service.” At the time of his death, he lived at 216 Clermont Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 13, lot 9502.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STERLING, CHARLES R. (1840-1878). First lieutenant, 62nd New York Infantry, Companies E and K. Sterling, who was born in New York State, enlisted as a private at New York City on June 14, 1861. On July 3, 1861, he mustered into Company E of 62nd New York Infantry, and was transferred into Company K about 12 days later. On August 31, 1861, he was promoted to first lieutenant and served in that rank until his discharge on August 10, 1864. He last lived in Manhattan at 39 West 45th Street. Section 66, lot 4168.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STERLING, JOHN (1845-1876). Private, 13th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company E. A native of Ireland, Sterling enlisted at Brooklyn on May 28, 1862, and mustered into the 13th New York the same day. He mustered out after three months on September 12. After the War, he was a member of his regiment’s veterans’ association and the Star Base Ball Club. Sterling died at his home at 235 Wyckoff Street in Brooklyn. Section 146, lot 22311.

STERRITT, ROBERT M. (1843-1919). Private, 37th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company B. He served 30 days in 1863, starting in June and ending during July. After the War, he was a member of the G.A.R.’s James C. Rice Post #29. His name was on the roster of the Sons of Union Veterans as “Robert M. Sterrill.” He last lived at 222 West 23rd Street in Manhattan. Section 177, lot 17844.

STEVENS, FRANCIS K. (1840-1874). Second lieutenant, 1st New York Infantry, Company G. Stevens was born in New York State. After enlisting on November 11, 1862, and mustering into the 1st New York on that date, he was wounded at Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 2, 1863, and taken that day as a prisoner of war. He was paroled on May 13, and mustered out on May 25 at New York City. A resident of Poughkeepsie, New York, he died in Aiken, South Carolina. Section 150, lot 10411.

 

 

 

 

 

STEVENS, HENRY L. (1830-1862). First lieutenant and quartermaster, 83rd New York Infantry. He enlisted as a first lieutenant on May 27, 1861, at New York City, and was immediately commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 83rd New York (originally the 9th New York State Militia). He rose to first lieutenant and quartermaster, but was not commissioned in at that rank. Stevens died of consumption at New York City on June 21, 1862. Section 106, lot 10844.

 

 

 

 

 

STEVENS, THOMAS (1841-1872). Private, 5th New York Heavy Artillery, Company I. Born in Ireland, he enlisted on February 5, 1864, at Brooklyn, as a private, and mustered immediately into Company I of the 5th New York Heavy Artillery. He mustered out on July 19, 1865, at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. At the time of his death, he resided at 15 East 14th Street in Manhattan. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 1701.

STEVENSON, JAMES C. (1838-1916). Second lieutenant, 70th New York Infantry, Companies A and K; private, 11th New York Cavalry. A native New Yorker, he enlisted as a sergeant at Staten Island on May 14, 1861, and mustered into Company A of the 70th on June 20. On October 8, 1861, he was promoted to first sergeant and rose to second lieutenant on May 6, 1862, effective upon his transfer that date to Company K. He was discharged on November 25, 1862. He re-enlisted at New York City on March 10, 1864, and mustered into the 11th New York Cavalry as private, unassigned to any company. As per his obituary in the New York Sun, which confirms his Civil War service, he was the treasurer of the Stereotypers Union #1 in Manhattan. He last resided at 879 Putnam Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 170, lot 13956.

STEVENSON, JOHN H. (1839-1899). Acting assistant paymaster and clerk, United States Navy. Stevenson, a native of New York City, was appointed volunteer acting assistant paymaster and clerk in the United States Navy on September 19, 1862. While attached to the USS Satellite in the Potomac campaign in December 1862, he distinguished himself by capturing a group of Confederates and then destroying signal and recruiting stations. In June 1863, while aboard the USS Princess Royal in the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Stevenson learned of the enemy’s plan to attack Fort Donaldsonville, Louisiana, then countered with a plan to save the fort and his ship. On July 10, 1863, he volunteered to pick up dispatches from the USS New London, which was aground under enemy fire, and bring them to Admiral David Farragut, a journey he carried out on horseback over 85 miles in enemy territory.

Stevenson remained in the Navy after the Civil War and served in United States ports, the South Atlantic and Pacific stations and Nagasaki, Japan. He retired with the rank of pay inspector on September 25, 1893. Returning to active duty during the Spanish-American War, he served as a pay officer in the Coast Defense System. His obituary in the New York Herald confirms his Naval service. He last lived in Brooklyn. The USS Stevenson, a destroyer commissioned in December 1942, was named in his honor. Section 84, lot 7281, grave 6.

 

 

STEVENSON, MATTHEW RIDER (1825-1863). Captain, 7th Infantry, United States Army. Stevenson attended the United States Military Academy at West Point entering on July 1, 1841, and graduating number 51 in the class of 1846. He was commissioned into the 1st Infantry, United States Army, on July 1, 1846, and brevetted to second lieutenant. That same day, he was commissioned captain of the 2nd New York Volunteers and became second lieutenant of the 7th Infantry, United States Army, on February 16, 1847. He served during the Mexican War in California in 1847-1848, remained there until 1850 at which time he was assigned to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was promoted to first lieutenant on August 24, 1851, and continued with the 7th Infantry in that capacity until September 20, 1856, when he was dismissed. On June 14, 1858, he was reinstated as a captain of the 7th Infantry.

During the Civil War, Stevenson served in New Mexico and Arizona from April through July 1861, and was engaged at the action at Mesilla, Arizona, on July 25, 1861. According to Cullum’s Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates of the United States Military Academy, Stevenson was surrendered by Major Lynde on July 27, 1861, to Texas Insurgents and remained on parole doing garrison duty until his exchange. By order of the secretary of war, on August 27, 1862, he was exchanged for Captain C. S. Coffey of the 19th Mississippi. From October 8, 1862, until January 2, 1863, he was on sick duty. He died of typhoid fever on January 2, 1863, at New York City, where he last lived in Manhattan at 243 West 21st Street. Section 94, lot 1386.

STEWART, ALEXANDER T. (1848-1906). Private, 155th New York Infantry, Company D. A life-long resident of Brooklyn, he enlisted there on September 15, 1862, mustered into the 155th New York on November 17, and was discharged for disability on May 31, 1865. After the War, he was active in the G. K. Warren Post #286 of the G.A.R. and was a volunteer fireman. He lived at 556 Lexington Avenue in the Brooklyn at the time of his death. Section 186, lot 19717.

STEWART, CHARLES L. (1845-1864). Bugler, 2nd New York Veteran Cavalry, Company I. After enlisting as a private at Saratoga, New York, on August 7, 1863, Stewart mustered into the 2nd New York Veteran Cavalry on November 10, 1863, and was promoted to bugler at some point during his service. He died on July 15, 1864, at New Orleans, Louisiana. Section 70, lot 14549.

STEWART, GEORGE (1818-1864). Private, 4th New York Heavy Artillery, Company F. Scottish by birth, he enlisted at New York City where he lived at 618 Hudson Street, on December 13, 1862, and mustered in on that date. He succumbed to chronic diarrhea on October 31, 1864, at Alexandria, Virginia, and was interred at Green-Wood on January 21, 1865. Section 24, lot 5673.

stewartSTEWART, GEORGE ANTHONY (1846-1931). First class boy, United States Navy. Born in New York City, Stewart enlisted there on August 3, 1864, at the age of 17. According to a descendant, this was against his parents’ wishes, twice getting strangers to sign as his father, and twice being rescued by his mother. The third time he was successful and was enlisted as a first class boy in the Navy before his mother could retrieve him. At the time of his enlistment he was a boilermaker with hazel eyes, brown hair, and a florid complexion, who was 5′ 1″ tall. Stewart served on the USS Restless with the East Gulf Squadron blockading the west coast of Florida. He was discharged in July 1865.

Stewart was active in the Adam Goss Post #330 of the G.A.R., and was appointed aide-de-camp in 1922. At the end of his life, he lived on Wegner Parkway in Jersey City, New Jersey. A descendant has donated his G.A.R. handkerchief, his railroad pass and timetable for the 1913 reunion at Gettysburg, as well as several G.A.R. medals to the Green-Wood Historic Fund. Section 6, lot 27462.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STEWART, JOHN (1842-1909). Unknown soldier history. A native of Hudson, New Jersey, Stewart was a Civil War veteran and a member of the G.A.R. The details of his service are unknown. He last lived on Adelphi Street in Brooklyn. Section 82, lot 4756.

STEWART, JOSEPH D. (1807-1868). Assistant surgeon, 31st New York Infantry; 74th New York Infantry. A native of New York, Stewart enlisted as an assistant surgeon at Washington, D.C., on August 18, 1862, was immediately commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 31st New York, and resigned on December 30, 1862. He returned to service as an assistant surgeon on June 5, 1863, and was commissioned that day into the Field and Staff of the 74th New York. The next month, he was wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 2, 1863.

Brigadier General Andrew Humphreys, commanding officer, wrote in his field report of August 16, 1863, that Stewart was wounded in action and described the “hottest fire” at Gettysburg, “The conduct and bearing of both officers and men was so good under the fatigues of the long and tiresome marches, and so gallant, brave, and steady in action, that it is almost impossible to particularize individual acts. It is enough to say that every officer and man in the command seemed determined to sustain the reputation of the brigade, earned on many a hard-fought field, and how well they succeeded is best shown by the loss sustained.” He mustered out on August 3, 1864, at Petersburg, Virginia. His last address was 172 Charlton Street in New York City. Section 91, lot 969.

STEWART, LEONARD D. (1841-1920). Private, 12th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company F. Irish by birth, Stewart served for three months in 1861; he enlisted on April 19 and was discharged August 5. In 1907, he filed for and was granted a pension, certificate 1,134,028. His last residence was 483 East 137th Street, Manhattan. Upon his death in 1920, his widow applied for a pension that was granted, certificate 902,530. Section 188, lot 15708.

STEWART, ROBERT K. (1838-1884). First lieutenant, 2nd New York Heavy Artillery, Company C; private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company G. Stewart, who was born in New York State, first served with the 7th Regiment, enlisting as a private at New York City on April 17, 1861, mustering in on April 26, and mustering out with his company at New York City on June 3.

Stewart re-enlisted as a first lieutenant on August 5, 1861, at New York City, and was commissioned into the 2nd New York Heavy Artillery on September 25, 1861. His regiment was assigned to garrison duty in the forts on the Potomac for 18 months. Stewart was slightly injured at Second Bull Run, Virginia, and while serving under General Grant on the march to Richmond, Virginia, was twice injured at Spotsylvania Court House, in the right ankle and in the torso. After he was taken as a prisoner of war there on May 19, 1864, he was confined for ten months at Richmond, Virginia; Macon, Georgia; Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina. He mustered out of service on March 11, 1865. He last lived at 427 West 18th Street in Manhattan. His death was a suicide. Section 167, lot 16657.

 

 

 

 

STEWART, THOMAS (1809-1891). Quartermaster, United States Navy. Born in Brooklyn at the corner of Gold and High Streets, and a rope-maker by trade, Stewart served for 29 years as quartermaster at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. He resigned the position shortly after the Civil War. A member of the Society of Old Brooklynites, he was one of the old “leatherheads” who guarded the city in the 1840s and 50s and was the hero of an 1891 story by “Punch” Duflon in the Sunday Eagle about a “leatherhead” who had a struggle with a ghost in Military Garden about that time. He married a daughter of Sheriff Furman. A widower, he last lived with his son at 91 North Oxford Street, Brooklyn. Section 15, lot 7945.

STEWART, WILLIAM (1828-1866). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company B. Stewart, who was born in New York, enlisted as a private on October 18, 1862, at Brooklyn, mustering into his company two days later. Further details are not available. Stewart last lived at 178 Schermerhorn Street in Brooklyn. Section 95, lot 3538.

STILES, JOHN WESLEY (1811-1885). Colonel, 9th Regiment, New York State Militia; 83rd New York Infantry. Before the Civil War, John Wesley Stiles worked in the ship chandlery business in New York City. He joined the 9th New York State Militia as its colonel on May 16, 1861, was commissioned in 11 days later, and became colonel of the 83rd New York Infantry that December. In 1861, he commanded the 3rd Brigade, Banks’ Division, and the 3rd Brigade 2nd Division of the 3rd Corps the next year. Stiles was discharged for disability in January 1863 due to “exposure and fatigue of the campaign to the Rapidan and subsequent Battle of Bull Run.” Following the War, he became an inventor of steam gauges, and was awarded the Gold Medal at the American Institute Fair in 1884 for his hydrostatic gauge. Section 61, lot 17536.

stiles

STILES, REUBEN H. (1837-1883). Private, 32nd New York Infantry, Company K; 121st New York Infantry. Born in New York City, Stiles enlisted there as a private on August 7, 1862, mustered into the 32nd New York on August 18, and was transferred into an unknown company of the 121st New York on May 25, 1863, from which he was discharged. According to the New York City Directory of 1877, he was employed as a painter. His last residence was 774 Greenwich Street in New York City. Section 181, lot 11046.

STILL, CHARLES (1833-1873). Private, 82nd New York Infantry, Company K. After Still enlisted at New York City as a private on May 21, 1861, he mustered immediately into the 82nd New York, and was discharged for disability on January 22, 1863, at Fort Monroe, Virginia. His last residence was 23 West 48th Street in Manhattan. Mary Still applied for a widow’s pension in 1886 that was granted under certificate 324,625. Section 127, lot 8899, grave 60.

STILLMAN, AMOS B. (?-?). Private, 34th New Jersey Infantry, Company I. He enlisted on October 17, 1863, mustered in three days later, and mustered out at Louisville, Kentucky, on June 9, 1865. Section ?, lot ?.

STILLWELL, GEORGE (1838-1909). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company B. Born in Gravesend, Brooklyn, Stillwell enlisted as a private at Brooklyn on April 19, 1861, and mustered into the 14th on May 23. He mustered out at New York City on June 6, 1864.

At the time of the 1880 census, Stillwell was working as a blacksmith. In 1890, he applied for and received an invalid pension, certificate 692,754. On June 3, 1890, he mustered into Clarence D. Mackenzie Post #399 of the G.A.R.; he listed his occupation as machinist. He last lived on Coney Island Avenue and Avenue S in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to nephritis. Stillwell’s estate included personal property valued at over $12,000. Section 200, lot 32150, graves 12-13.

STILLWELL (or STILWELL), GEORGE W. (1811-1901). Colonel, lieutenant colonel and major by brevet; captain, 67th New York Infantry, Company B. Born in Brooklyn in the Fort Hamilton section, his parents traced their lineage in America to the 1600s. A craftsman in the iron foundry business, he enlisted at Brooklyn as a captain on April 20, 1861, and was commissioned in on June 20, 1861. During his military career, he raised a company of one hundred men who joined the 1st Long Island Regiment, which was incorporated into the 67th New York. He served in the Peninsula Campaign, at South Mountain and Antietam, Maryland, and in Virginia at Fredericksburg and Fair Oaks. At Fair Oaks, his company lost one third of its members, including his son, James (see). He was discharged on December 29, 1862, on account of disease. Stillwell was promoted by brevet to the rank of major on July 23, 1866, for “gallant and meritorious service.” Subsequently, he was promoted by brevet to lieutenant colonel on September 13, 1866, and then brevetted to colonel a month later on October 16. According to William Swinton’s History of the Seventh Regiment (1876), Stillwell also served in Company B of that unit; his service may have occurred before the Civil War.

After the War, Stillwell was active in the William Rankin Post #10 and the Milliken Post of the G.A.R., holding leadership positions in both. According to his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, it was his last wish that his comrades from the military attend his funeral. He was a life-long resident of Brooklyn. Section 155, lot 26490.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STILLWELL, JAMES H. (1844-1862). Private, 67th New York Infantry, Company B. He enlisted at Brooklyn on May 25, 1861, and mustered into Company B of the 67th New York, of which his father, George (see), was captain, on August 31, 1861. After being wounded on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, he succumbed on June 3, 1862, at White House, Virginia. Originally interred at Green-Wood on June 21, 1862, he was transferred to another lot on October 29, 1879. He last resided at 350 Sackett Street in Brooklyn. Section 155, lot 26490, grave 1343.

 

 

 

 

 

STILLWELL, JOSEPH (1839-1895). Private, 5th New York Infantry, Company G; 5th New York Heavy Artillery, Company M. After he enlisted as a private at New York City on April 25, 1861, Stillwell, a native of the city, mustered into the 5th New York Infantry on May 9. During his service, he was involved in several untoward occurrences including an arrest for desertion in February 1862, an incident in a Baltimore brothel, and an accidental injury in which he cut his foot with an ax. After he mustered out with his company on May 14, 1863, at New York City, he subsequently served with the 5th New York Heavy Artillery beginning on January 20, 1864. He deserted on October 31 of that year and surrendered on March 22, 1865, under the President’s Proclamation. Section 135, lot 27263, grave 697.

STILWELL (or STILLWELL), WILLIAM ROSS (1841-1864). Civil War Surgeon. Stilwell’s father, who was born in Queens, owned a grocery store; his mother was born in New Hampshire and his older brother, Charles, was a physician. As per the New York State census of 1855, he lived in Brooklyn with his parents and siblings. The family of 14 and one Irish servant lived in a house that was valued at $6,000, the equivalent of $175,000 in 2019. William Stilwell attended Columbia College; his address in the 1864 and 1865 yearbooks was 214 West 34th Street in Manhattan.

As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, he died of fever while performing his duties as a surgeon at Mount Pleasant Hospital in Washington, D.C. Further details about his service are not known. His funeral was at the home of his mother, Charlotte Stilwell, at 73 Henry Street in Brooklyn. His name is spelled Stillwell in the Green-Wood database where he is listed as a physician. Section 107, lot 168.

STITT, JOHN (1817-1864). Private, 66th New York Infantry, Company I. A native of New York, Stitt enlisted at New York City on October 16, 1861, and mustered into the 66th on November 4. He was wounded at Fredericksburg, Virginia, on December 13, 1862. On September 15, 1863, he transferred out (subsequent service not listed). He died on November 9, 1864, most likely as a result of his wounds, in Boston, Massachusetts, where he resided. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot).

STOCKDILL (or STOCKDALE), RICHARD (1832-1867). Private, 79th New York Infantry, Company C. Of Irish birth, he enlisted at New York City as a private on October 17, 1861, and mustered into the 79th New York on that date. At some point, he was wounded in action then moved to Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, where he was discharged for his injuries on March 28, 1863. He last lived at 522 West 27th Street in Manhattan. Section D, lot 7078, grave 314.

 

 

 

 

STOCKWELL, THOMAS N. (1826-1862). Private, 51st New York Infantry, Company G. A native New Yorker, he was a paper hanger by trade with a personal estate valued at $200, according to the census of 1860. Stockwell enlisted at Brooklyn where he resided at 279 Myrtle Avenue, on September 4, 1861, and mustered into the 51st on September 12. A year later, he was killed at Burnside Bridge at the Battle of Antietam, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. Five days later, Samuel Sims (see) read this letter at Burnside Bridge:

Headquarters, 51st Regt. N.Y. Vols

Near Village of Antietam MD

Sept 22nd, 1862

Mrs. Thos Stockwell

Dear Madame

It has become my most painful and unavoidable duty to announce to you the death of your husband. He was killed while in the faithful discharge of his duty at the storming of Antietam Bridge Maryland in the morning of September 17th 1862. Our joy at gaining the victory that day has been restrained by our remembrance of the brave men who fell—the faces of our comrades once so familiar that are lost to us, and more than that, the grief that we know will be brought to the home of our noble brother who has rendered his life a sacrifice to prove his devotion to our country, flag, and constitution. Your husband died at the moment of victory. Our Regiment with the Brigade had been ordered forward by Genl. Burnside to advance to the Bridge where the rebels were posted in strong force. They were the Brigade of sharpshooters called “Toombs Brigade” consisting I believe of Georgia, S. Carolina and Mississippi riflemen. The action lasted about one hour before poor Tom fell. He heard as he died the shout of victory. A noble death! but to you a stroke which I fear no words of mine can render alleviation. I humbly pray to my God that he will be with you in your affliction.

His grave is in the valley near the bridge, fifteen of his comrades lie there with him. I have caused an inscription to be placed over him. A final statement of his effects will be sent forward today to Washington. I enclose a lock of his hair. If you make application by letter to the Adjutant General at Washington you will get information as to the final settlement with the government. There are parties in New York who assist in procuring these settlements. If you make application to the Adjt. Genl Major LeGendre of our Regt. who is in New York in Broadway near Reade St. or to Elliott Shepard in Wall St. I regret not being able to give you more information in this reference, but trust that you will find plenty of sympathizing friends who will interest themselves in your behalf. I would suggest Gen. Crooke as a proper adviser.

Again dear madame let me assure you of my deep sympathy in your loss and believe your sincere friend.

Samuel H. Sims

Capt. Co. G, 51st N.Y.

On November 15, 1862, Caroline Stockwell received a widow’s pension under certificate 25,892. He was buried at Green-Wood on April 11, 1863. On April 13, 1863, the following Letter to the Editor was published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

—Dear Sir:—I would through your paper express my sincere and heartfelt thanks to Mr. William B. Van Brunt, Undertaker, of No. 213 Court st. corner of West Baltic st, for the noble kindness and interest he has evinced in my behalf, who after protracted efforts, has succeeded in recovering the remains of my husband, Thomas N. Stockwell, who was killed at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 17,1862. Regardless of self interest has more than accomplished by every wish, and I would assure him that I shall always hold in grateful remembrance his many acts of kindness to a stranger, and trust he will accept this offering as coming from a thankful heart.

MRS. THOMAS N. STOCKWELL

A government-issued gravestone was installed for him circa 1900. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 69.

bridge

51st NY & 51st PA attacking across Burnside’s Bridge.

STODDARD, CHARLES H. (1826-1899). Quartermaster, 23rd Regiment, New York State National Guard. Stoddard was born in Fairhaven, Massachusetts. As per his obituary in the New York Tribune, he was one of the founders of the military company which became the nucleus of the 23rd Regiment and served with the 23rd during the Civil War. Stoddard enlisted and was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 23rd Regiment on June 18, 1863, and mustered out at Brooklyn on July 22, 1863.

In civilian life, Stoddard was involved with the gas industry in Brooklyn. He was president of the Metropolitan Gas Company before it merged with the Brooklyn Gas Company of which he was the treasurer. His obituary notes that he was the president of the 23rd Regiment Veteran Organization for many years and was a member of the Brooklyn Club. His last residence was on West 45th Street in Manhattan. Section 171, lot 12486, grave 13.

stodderSTODDER, LOUIS NAPOLEON (1837-1911). Acting volunteer lieutenant, United States Navy. Born in Boston, and a resident of Massachusetts, Stodder’s first wife was Watie Howland Alderich; the couple had two children, separated but were never divorced. He began his service as an acting master when he enlisted and was commissioned into the Navy on December 26, 1861. He served in that capacity on the USS Monitor during its famous battle with the CSS Virginia, known familiarly as the Merrimack, on March 9, 1862. He made note of weather conditions, which were clear, in the ship’s log, and recorded that there was fire from the rebel ship. In that battle, he was wounded when he was at the wheel and was struck by a shell from the Merrimack. He was in the turret at the time, came in contact with one of its iron plates, was knocked unconscious, treated by the ship surgeon, and came to in about an hour at which time he returned to duty. In a log written by Commander J. P. Bankhead, it was noted that Stodder, “remained with me until the last, and by example and bearing did much towards inspiring confidence and obedience on the part of others.” Another ship log notes that Stodder was first stationed at the reversing wheel but because of rust was unable to turn the wheel and had to be assisted by the chief engineer.

On October 4, 1862, Stodder wrote about public’s great interest in the Monitor when she visited the Washington, D.C., Navy Yard and immediately became a tourist attraction. Stodder wrote, “When we came up to clean that night there was not a key, doorknob, escutcheon – there wasn’t a thing that hadn’t been carried away.” On January 1, 1863, he transferred to the USS Rhode Island and rose to the rank of acting volunteer lieutenant on January 10, 1863. Stodder then commanded the USS Release as of January 10, 1863, and the USS Adela as of May 15, 1863. He participated in the North Atlantic and East Gulf Squadrons at Hampton Roads, Virginia, from June 1863 through November 1864. During that time, Stodder’s ship engaged in the shelling of Fort Brooke, Florida, and a raid on blockade runners on October 17, 1863. He was transferred to the USS Niphon on February 6, 1865, and the USS Calypso on February 22, 1865. Stodder was assigned to the Potomac Flotilla on April 14, 1865, to guard Washington, D.C., after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Subsequently, he was assigned to Charleston Harbor from April 24, 1865 through June of that year. At some point, he was on board the USS Ohio. Stodder was honorably discharged on November 20, 1865. His gallantry was recognized by appreciative citizens who awarded him with two presentation swords including one from Tiffany’s.

Remaining at sea, Stodder served in the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service, starting as a third lieutenant from October 27, 1865, until his discharge to the United States Navy on November 20, 1865, where he was promoted to second lieutenant on June 6, 1866, and to first lieutenant on July 20, 1870. He was promoted to captain in 1879 and commanded the USS Oliver Wolcott where he quelled Indian disturbances at Fort Simpson, British Columbia, on January 11, 1883. He became supervisor of anchorages at the Barge Office in the Battery in 1892, remained in that position until 1901, and retired a year later. On July 27, 1910, he donated his log book from the USS Monitor to the United States Navy. His second wife was Rose Champlin; the couple had one child. He last resided at 284 Kingston Avenue in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to apoplexy and pulmonary edema following a nervous breakdown. Section 137, lot 27931.

STOLTZ, FREDERICK (or FREDERICH) (1832-1883). Commissary sergeant, 5th New York Heavy Artillery, Company D. Born in the West Indies, Stoltz enlisted at Brooklyn as a private on January 2, 1862, and mustered into Company D of the 5th New York Heavy Artillery on February 1. At some point, he was promoted to commissary sergeant and transferred to the Field and Staff but returned to Company D as a private on May 1, 1862. He was discharged for disability on May 5, 1864, at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. On May 18, 1864, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 35,477. At the time of his death, he lived at 254 Newark Avenue in Jersey City, New Jersey. A. E. (Anna Elizabeth) Stoltz, applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1884, certificate 236,993. Section 107, lot 12650.

STONE, EDGAR A. (1844-1864). Private, 25th Massachusetts Infantry, Company D. Born in Connecticut, he was a student in Worchester, Massachusetts, when he enlisted on October 12, 1861, and immediately mustered into the 25th Massachusetts. He re-enlisted on December 17, 1863, died of disease on July 21, 1864, at the 18th Army Corps Hospital, in City Point, Virginia, and was buried at Green-Wood on October 25. Section 73, lot 6032.

STONE, HENRY (1837-1900). Private, 112th New York Infantry, Company E. Stone enlisted at New York City as a private on February 28, 1865, and mustered the same day into the 112th New York. He also served in the 64th New York Cavalry. He was listed as a deserter on May 2, 1865.

A resident of Essex Street, Brooklyn, he died of a pistol shot on the corner of Fulton Street and Shepherd Avenue in Brooklyn. His widow, Maria C. Stone, applied for and received a pension in 1900, certificate 522,838. Section 135, lot 30010, grave 494.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STONE, HENRY VAN DYKE (1843-1863). Second lieutenant, 2nd Massachusetts Infantry, Companies C and H. Stone was a student in Brookline, Massachusetts, his birthplace, when he enlisted on August 7, 1862. He mustered into Company C of the 2nd Massachusetts as a private on August 15. During his service, he was promoted to sergeant and ultimately rose to second lieutenant on March 19, 1862. At some point, he transferred into Company H. He was killed on July 3, 1863, at the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, buried there, and then moved to the family plot at Green-Wood on January 5, 1864. Section 54, lot 380.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STONE, MALCOLM (or MALCOM) (1839-1870). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company E. A native of Ireland, Stone enlisted as a private at Brooklyn on April 18, 1861, and mustered into the 14th on May 23. Wounded at Bull Run, Virginia, on July 21, 1861, he was discharged for wounds on December 3, 1862. He last lived at 1303 Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 127, lot 17931, grave 455.

 

 

 

 

 

 

STONE, MATTHEW (1834-1875). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company E; 5th New York Infantry, Company H. An Irish native, Stone enlisted at Brooklyn on December 29, 1863, mustered into the 14th Brooklyn that same day, and was transferred into the 5th New York on June 2, 1864, from which he was discharged.

In 1875, he applied for an invalid pension, application 201,531, but he apparently died before it was certified. He died at his residence, 21 Warren Street in Brooklyn, from a fractured skull. In 1890, his wife, Annie Stone, applied for a widow’s pension, certificate 344,864. Section 15, lot 17263, grave 1401.

STOOTHOFF, JOHN (1842-1918). Corporal, 139th New York Infantry, Company G. Originally from Long Island, he enlisted at Brooklyn as a corporal on August 26, 1862, and mustered into the 139th New York on September 9. He was reduced in rank to private on February 1, 1864, was wounded at Cold Harbor, Virginia, on June 2, 1864, and was promoted to corporal on August 22, 1864. On June 19, 1865, he mustered out at Richmond, Virginia. In 1883, he applied for and received an invalid pension, certificate 843,923. He last lived at 2508 Church Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 159, lot 13256.

stoothoffSTOOTHOFF, JOHN H. (1845-1886). Private, 139th New York Infantry, Company I. John H. Stoothoff enlisted as a private at Brooklyn on August 22, 1862, mustered into Company I of the 139th New York on September 9, and mustered out on June 19, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. He last lived at 125 Waverly Place in Brooklyn. Harriet Stoothoff applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1890, certificate 321,568. Section L, lot 17894, grave 1.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STOPPELKAM, AUGUSTUS (1842-1906). Private, 4th New York Infantry, Company B. Born in New York City, Stoppelkam enlisted there as a private on November 6, 1861, the same date that he mustered into the 4th New York. On September 17, 1862, he was wounded in action at the Battle of Antietam, Maryland. He mustered out on May 25, 1863, at New York City.

According to the New York City Directory of 1881, Stoppelkam was in the cigar business at 244 Grand Street and lived nearby at 376 Grand Street in Manhattan. In 1884, he became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic’s Adam Goss Post #330. His last residence was 1932 Third Avenue in Manhattan. Section 50, lot 8682, grave 10.

STOREY, JAMES HENRY (1847-1927). First lieutenant and regimental quartermaster, 16th Regiment Infantry, Corps D’Afrique (subsequently the 87th United States Colored Infantry or USCT); private, 176th New York Infantry, Company B. Born in England, he enlisted on May 28, 1862, two days before his fifteenth birthday. On October 18, 1862, he mustered into the 176th New York as a private. He was appointed second lieutenant, 16th Regiment Infantry, Corps D’Afrique, on October 14, 1863, and was promoted to first lieutenant and regimental quartermaster of the same regiment on December 1, 1864. He mustered out on August 14, 1865, and was honorably discharged from the Army on December 27, 1867, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Storey returned to live in Brooklyn after his discharge, and applied for an invalid pension in 1887, on the basis of arm injuries suffered “while carrying dispatches from Brazos Santiago to Clarksville, Texas” in 1864. The pension was granted, certificate 447,933. He declared the pension in May 1912 “for the purpose of being placed on the pension roll of the United States under the provisions of the act of May 11, 1912,” and in 1913, Storey requested a correction on his pension rate, saying that he was not entitled to an increase “from 16 to 19 dollars per month from May 30, 1913, as on that date I attained my 66th birthday.” He last resided in Scarsdale, New York. Section J, lot 36274.

STORK, EMIL (or EMILE) (1837-1920). Corporal, 62nd New York Infantry, Companies E and F. A native of Germany, he immigrated to the United States in 1855. During the Civil War, Stork served in the 62nd New York Infantry, also known as the Anderson Zouaves. He enlisted as a private at New York City to serve three years on June 30, 1861, and mustered into Company E. He was transferred within the regiment to Company F in August 1861. After a promotion to corporal on October 1, 1861, he returned to ranks on December 28, 1861. He deserted on June 30, 1863, at Westminster, Maryland.

Census records from 1870 through 1910 indicate that he was a resident of Manhattan. Stork appears in the Veterans Schedule of 1890 as residing at 455 West 24th Street in Manhattan; that also was his residence at the time of his death, which was attributed to apoplexy. Section 168, lot 16563.

stork.stone

STORMS, JOSEPH H. (1827-1885). Private, 1st New Jersey Cavalry, Company G. A native of New York City, Storms enlisted as a private in New Jersey on October 3, 1861, and mustered into the 1st New Jersey Cavalry. On December 3, 1861, he was discharged for disability at Camp Curtis, Virginia. In 1881, he applied for an invalid pension, application 432,730, but no certificate number is listed. His last residence was 67 East 128th Street in Manhattan. In 1890, his wife, Anne (Annie) Storms, who is interred with him, applied for a widow’s pension, application 432,366, but there is no certificate number. Section 166, lot 24951.

STORMS, WILLIAM H. (1833-1878). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company B; 12th Veteran Reserve Corps, Company G. A native New Yorker, Storms enlisted as a private at Brooklyn on September 12, 1862, and mustered into the 14th Brooklyn that day. On June 28, 1863, he was absent, sick and hospitalized at the U.S. General Hospital in Frederick, Maryland. He was transferred into the 12th Veteran Reserve Corps on October 1, 1864, and was discharged on July 6, 1865, at Wilmington, North Carolina. He last lived at 130 East 17th Street in Manhattan. In 1882, Josephine Storms applied for and was granted a widow’s pension, certificate 270,534. Section 187, lot 19798.

 

 

 

 

STORMS, WILLIAM KEITH (1842-1939). Musician, 22nd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company E; drummer, 8th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company B. A New York City native, Storms enlisted as a drummer and served for three months in 1861 with the 8th Regiment. In 1863, he served for 30 days as a musician in the 22nd Regiment. In 1895, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 1,043,949. His last residence was 298 Broad Street in Red Bank, New Jersey. Section 193, lot 33323, grave 2.

STORR, ROBERT (1840-1862). Unknown soldier history. The details of Storr’s service are unknown but he was buried in the Soldiers’ Lot at Green-Wood, an area set aside for Civil War veterans. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 109.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STORRS, SAMUEL JOHN (1838-1892). Lieutenant colonel, 52nd Massachusetts Infantry. Storrs, who was born in Holliston, Massachusetts, was a student at Amherst College in 1856. During the Civil War, he was a teacher and resident of Amherst, Massachusetts, when he enlisted as lieutenant colonel on October 13, 1862. He had previously been promoted to captain on September 12, 1862, assigned to Company G, but never mustered. On November 19, 1862, he was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 52nd Massachusetts, and mustered out on August 14, 1863, at Camp Miller in Greenfield, Massachusetts.

Draft Registration Records for Massachusetts indicate that Storrs was a teacher from 1863 through 1865. The New York City Directories for 1872, 1874, 1876, 1882 and 1889 report that he was a lawyer. As per the 1880 census, he was married and lived in New York City at the home of his mother-in-law. He last lived on West 84th Street in New York City. Julia Storrs, who is interred with him, applied for a widow’s pension in 1894, application 592,315, but she died before it was certified. Section 50, lot 7157.


STOUT, ALBERT (or HERBERT) (1835-1885). Private, 42nd New York Infantry, Company F. Born in Germany, Stout enlisted as a private at New York City on May 12, 1861, and mustered into the 42nd on June 22. He was taken as a prisoner of war on June 22, 1864, at Weldon Railroad, Virginia, and released six months later on December 6 at an unstated place. He mustered out on April 4, 1865, at New York City. At the time of his death, he was a resident at the Charity Hospital on Welfare Island in New York City. Section A, lot 9146, grave 307.

STOUT, FRANCIS AQUILA (1833-1892) Special policeman during the New York Draft Riots. Stout’s mother, Anne Morris Stout, was the sister of Arthur B. Morris (see). Francis’s family’s roots trace back to colonial America when his family settled in Morrisania, an area named for the Morris family, that once encompassed both part of the Bronx and part of Westchester County. His mother and father were cousins. His maternal grandfather, Lieutenant William Walton Morris, served during the American Revolution and was on the staff of General Anthony Wayne. Stout’s maternal great-grandfather, Lewis Morris, was the lone New Yorker who signed the Declaration of Independence. Lewis Morris was the half-brother of Gouverneur Morris, a statesman and leading figure at the Constitutional Convention. His father, Aquila G. Stout, who was named after Colonel Aquila Giles, an officer during the American Revolution, was president of the Eagle Fire Insurance Company from 1846 through 1858. His paternal grandfather owned and lived in Philipse Manor house which later became the Yonkers City Hall.

According to a biography of Francis Stout in the Magazine of American History (Volume 28), he was educated under the tutelage of the Rev. Dr. Henry A. Muhlenberg. He entered Columbia College as a sophomore but then left to study in Paris where he pursued engineering but briefly turned to law when he returned to New York. Soon after, he suffered from a lingering illness that made him bed-ridden; he then became interested in charitable pursuits, an endeavor which continued for the rest of his life. A member of the Republican Party, his biographical sketch notes that he sympathized with the abolitionists and was an active supporter of the Union during the Civil War. Stout was a special policeman during the Draft Riots in New York City in July 1863. During this time, John Jay hid in Stout’s house on 9th Street because Jay was an object of the mob’s hatred.

Returning to his interest in civil engineering, Stout became an initiator of a new topographical New York State survey and as such worked with the American Geographical Society beginning in 1875 to work on this long-term project; he later became the senior vice-president of that organization. Among his other geographic pursuits was his work as president of the Nicaragua Canal Construction Company, an early attempt to construct a trans-continental waterway; he later resigned from that project citing a difference of opinion about financing that project. He often represented the American Geographical Society in Europe in attempts to foster exchange of maps, atlases and geographic projects. After his marriage in 1884, he and his wife hosted others who shared their interest in helping the community-at-large. Stout was also a trustee of the New York Society Library, the Greenwich Bank and a director of the South Carolina Railway Company. He had charitable affiliations with the Orthopedic Hospital, the New York Asylum for the Blind, the Cancer Hospital and the Samaritan Home for the Aged. He died in the Thousand Islands, New York. He is buried in the same lot as other members of the Morris family, including his uncle, Arthur B. Morris. Section 54, lot 1346.

STOUTENBOROUGH, EDWIN AUGUSTUS (1827-1905). Captain, 90th New York Infantry, Companies C, I, and B; second lieutenant, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. A native of New York City, Stoutenborough enlisted at Brooklyn on April 23, 1861, was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 13th Regiment on May 17, and mustered out on August 8 at Brooklyn. He re-enlisted at New York City on October 15, 1861, and was commissioned into the 90th New York, Company C, on January 13, 1862. After receiving a promotion to first lieutenant on August 29, 1862, effective upon his transfer to Company I, he was promoted to captain on July 23, 1863, to date from his transfer to Company B.

As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which details his service in the Civil War, Captain Stoutenborough made the first attack on Port Hudson, Louisiana, where he lost five men and an orderly sergeant, and later was stationed at Key West, Florida. He fought in sixty-six engagements, was never wounded and never took a furlough for disability or other reason during his almost five years of service. On February 9, 1866, he mustered out at Savannah, Georgia. His obituary, which indicates that he was promoted to major before the Civil War ended (thought that appears not to have been the case) and served proudly under General Philip Sheridan, notes that of the 1,000 men who originally enlisted in the 90th Regiment, he was among 32 who survived. In total, 3,500 men were recruited in the 90th during the course of the conflict.

The New York City Directory of 1877 lists Stoutenborough as a merchant at 272 Pearl Street in Manhattan, where he worked with his brother, Xenophon Stoutenborough (see), known familiarly as “X. Remaining active in military affairs, he was a member of the George G. Meade Post #38 of the G.A.R. and the 13th Regiment Veteran Association. He was also a Freemason. A bachelor, he last resided at 210 Prospect Place, Brooklyn. His funeral was held at the home of his brother Xenophon Stoutenborough, nicknamed “X.” Section 186, lot 19605, grave 15.

STOUTENBOROUGH, XENOPHON (1828-1909). Private, 23rd Regiment, New York State National Guard. Stoutenborough, who was born in New York City, was one of twelve children and was known familiarly as “X.” As per the census of 1850, he was a clerk living with his parents and siblings in Brooklyn; his obituary in the Citizen notes that he worked then at Benham & Whitney at 272 Pearl Street in Manhattan. His obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle indicates that he became a partner in that firm in 1858, at the time when the business was renamed T. H. Atwater & Company; that enterprise dealt in house furnishings and shipping supplies and was later renamed Atwater, Benham & Company in 1864.

According to his obituaries in The New York Times and the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Stoutenborough served for three months with the 23rd Regiment’s National Guard during the Civil War and was one of its charter members. Further details about his service are unknown.

The 1865 and 1870 censuses list Stoutenborough as living with his parents and siblings; his father was a wire dealer and Xenophon is listed on the 1870 census as a house furnishing dealer. Stoutenborough’s sister Emily was the wife of DeWitt Clinton Peters (see). Emily died in 1873 and DeWitt Peters died in 1876, leaving their two sons orphans. The Brooklyn Standard Union reported on June 15, 1876 that the Surrogate’s Court approved Xenophon Stoutenborough as the guardian of his nephews. On May 7, 1877, he applied as a guardian for a minor’s pension on behalf of the Peters two sons, DeWitt and William, and was awarded under certificate 180,544. At the time of the 1880 census, the Peters’s sons were living in Brooklyn with their aunt and three uncles, all Stoutenborough siblings; one of the brothers listed on that census was Edwin A. Stoutenborough (see). The aforementioned census lists Xenophon in the home furnishings business and Edwin as a clerk in that business.

The New York City Directory of 1877 lists him as a merchant at 272 Pearl Street in Manhattan. On May 3, 1882, Stoutenborough and Darius Benham applied for a United States patent for an ornamental crumb pan with a scallop-shell metal design and thumb-hole opening. The two men had a tinware factory in Glen Cove, Long Island, Benhams and Stoutenborough’s Tinware Factory, that produced items for the home of sheet iron that could be painted, varnished or glazed. A fire there on November 20, 1883, caused $10,000 in damage to the plant. On February 21, 1884, he married Harriet Estelle Partridge, a woman nineteen years his junior. In 1890, he was in business under his own name; Benham had died. At the time of the census of 1900, he was living at 175 Prospect Place in Brooklyn with his wife and daughters. He is listed in the 1891 New York City Directory as being in the home furnishing business. He was a member of the Masonic Veterans, Montauk Lodge. His last residence was 175 Prospect Place in Brooklyn where he succumbed to pneumonia. Tinware products manufactured by Benham & Stoutenborough have been offered for sale on eBay. Section 29, lot 9781, grave 1.

 

 

 

STRANAHAN, MARY (or MARIANNE) FITCH (1812-1866). President, Women’s Relief Association of Brooklyn and Long Island and Civil War nurse. Born in Westmoreland, New York, where she was well-educated, Stranahan moved to Brooklyn in 1845 where her husband was a Congressman from 1855-57. She directed the Graham Institute, an agency that provided relief to aged and indigent women for eight years prior to being elected president of the Women’s Relief Association, an arm of the United States Sanitary Commission, on November 23, 1862. The Association, which drew from 80 Brooklyn churches of all denominations and other auxiliaries on Long Island, was developed to coordinate the care of the soldiers who were sent to Brooklyn to recuperate from their injuries and/or ailments. Women volunteered as nurses to prepare special foods, furnish clothing, read or write letters and bestow kindness on those who served their country.

Stranahan was responsible in large part for spearheading the hugely successful Great Fair of Brooklyn, of which she wrote, “The aggregate of our efforts including the results of our Great Fair, represents a money value of not less than half a million dollars.” Of the proceeds, $300,000 went to the United States Sanitary Commission and $200,000 for hospital supplies. The Reverend Dr. Bellows, President of the United States Sanitary Commission, offered these words of praise in describing Brooklyn as a shining example for other cities and Stranahan’s leadership, “…As earnest, large, and noble in her views of what was due to the National cause, as the most zealous could be, she was yet so practical, judicious, and sober in her judgment, that what she planned, I learned to regard as certain of success…I have always supposed that her wisdom, resolution, and perseverance, had a controlling influence in the glorious success of the Brooklyn Relief Association-the most marked and memorable fellowship of women, united from all sects and orders of Christians, in one practical enterprise, that the world ever saw.” In ill health after the War, she withdrew from her activities, went to the Green Mountains to restore her strength, but died in Manchester, Vermont. She last lived at 11 Amity Street in Brooklyn. Section 81, lot 1826.

STRAND (or STRANDT), HENRY (1836-1865). Lieutenant, 1st United States Army Light Artillery, Battery H; first sergeant, New York Marine Light Artillery, Company A; sergeant, 12th United States Infantry, Company H. Strand was born in Schleswig, then a disputed area on the border of Denmark and Germany (now part of Germany). He enlisted in the United States Army as a private on August 8, 1856, and mustered into the 1st Light Artillery, Battery H. A member of the Fort Sumter (South Carolina) garrison, he was there from the first shot of the Civil War until its surrender in April 1861. He was sick at the Army Hospital in Hagerstown, Maryland, from June 21, 1861-August 1861, and discharged on August 8 with the rank of private.

Strand re-enlisted as a private at New York City on September 5, 1861, and immediately mustered into the New York Marine Light Artillery. He was promoted to first sergeant, confined for mutiny under criminal charges (place and date unstated), but never convicted, and dishonorably discharged on May 5, 1863. Strand re-enlisted as a sergeant on January 5, 1864, taken prisoner during fighting along the Weldon Railroad in Petersburg, Virginia, and confined at Belle Isle Prison near Richmond, Virginia, until 1865 when he was released because of failing health. He died at the Fort Hamilton Army Hospital in Brooklyn on October 30, 1865, cause of death unknown. His widow applied for a pension in 1867. His service in the 1st U.S. Artillery is confirmed by an inscription on his tombstone. Section 117, lot 10975, grave 1118.

STRANG, CORNELIUS S. (1836-1868). First lieutenant, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company D. After enlisting at Brooklyn on April 23, 1861, as a first lieutenant, Strang, who was born in New York, was commissioned into Company D of the 13th Regiment on May 17, and mustered out at Brooklyn on August 6, 1861. When his regiment was reactivated for three months on May 28, 1862, and part of the New York State National Guard, he was commissioned into the same company and mustered out at Brooklyn on September 9. A resident of 102 MacDougal Street in Manhattan, he died there of phthisis (consumption). Section 41, lot 7814.

strangSTRANG, JAMES H. (1844-1897). Private, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company D. Strang’s gravestone and pension index record indicate that he was a private in Company D of the 13th New York State Militia. No other details of his service are known.

As per the 1870 census, Strang was a mason who lived with his wife Ruth and daughter Henrietta in the 10th Ward of Brooklyn; at that time he owned $300 of personal property. He last lived at 22 1st Street in Brooklyn. Strang died from pneumonia. Ruth A. Strang, who is interred with him, applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1897, certificate 458,932.  Section 158, lot 15486, grave 5.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STRATTON (or STRATER, STRATTER), FREDERICK AUGUSTUS (or M.) (1843-1909). Private, 7th New York State Cavalry, Company E; 10th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, Company D. Stratton, a German native, used the aliases of Frederick Strater and Frederick Stratter during his service. He first enlisted as Frederick Strater as a private at Lowville, New York, on September 10, 1861, and mustered into Company E of the 7th New York Cavalry. He mustered out on March 21, 1862, at Washington, D.C. He then re-enlisted as a private using the alias of Frederick Stratter at Croghan, New York, on August 1, 1862, mustered into Company D of the 10th New York Heavy Artillery on September 11, and mustered out on June 23, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia.

The 1876 Brooklyn Directory lists Stratton as a grainer living at 395 Herkimer Street in Brooklyn; the 1886 Brooklyn Directory states that he was a painter living at 824 Fulton Street. The Veterans Census of 1890 confirms his Civil War service for 1861-1862, but his soldier records show that he served 1861-1865. In 1891, Stratton’s application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 1,072,296. His death certificate notes that he was employed as a packer in a department store. According to his obituary in The New York Times, which confirms his Civil War service and indicates a middle initial of M., he was a member of the Union Veterans Legion and had been a past Noble Grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He died from paralysis at his home at 839 Fulton Street in Brooklyn. His widow applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 681,773. Section 193, lot 26556.

STREERS (or STEERS), FRANCIS J. (1839-1870). Captain, 90th New York Infantry, Company C. Steers, an Irish native, enlisted as a first lieutenant at New York City on December 24, 1861, and was commissioned into the 90th New York on January 13, 1862. He was promoted to captain on April 9, 1864, and mustered out at New York City on December 10, 1864. During his service, he was in the Téche country at Port Hudson, Louisiana; Donaldsonville, Shenandoah Valley; Key West, Florida; and Fort Jefferson, Tortugas, and Beaufort, South Carolina. Steers was also detached to Rikers and Hart’s Island, New York Harbor, where he was a judge advocate at two general courts-martial. His bio is listed in William Swinton’s History of the Seventh Regiment (1870); it is not known when he served in Company G. His last address was 233 East 24th Street in Manhattan. Section 85, lot 17700, grave 141.

STREET, GEORGE W. (1842-1913). Sergeant, 7th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company B. A New York City native, Street was a descendant of a prominent New England family whose members were among the early settlers in New Haven, Connecticut. One record shows that he was born in New York, another indicates Norwalk, Connecticut. Educated at private school in Norwalk, Connecticut, he enlisted as a sergeant on May 25, 1862, mustered into the 7th Regiment, and mustered out at the expiration of his enlistment on September 5. He continued to be in the 7th National Guard for seven years and was later a lieutenant and commissary of the 23rd National Guard from 1880-1883.

In civilian life, Street was a jewelry manufacturer whose office was on John Street in Manhattan. A charter member of the Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R. as of 1880, he also belonged to the Seventh Regiment Veteran Association, the 23rd Regiment Veteran Association, the Freemasons, and the Hamilton Club in Brooklyn. In 1905, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 1,104,853. His last residence was 93 Joralemon Street in Brooklyn. Section 103, lot 19140.

 

 

 

 

STREET, WILLIAM C. (1805-1867). First lieutenant, 23rd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company H. He was commissioned into the 23rd Regiment when it was activated on June 18, 1863, and mustered out after 30 days on July 22 at Brooklyn. Section 95, lot 1604.

STREETER, MILFORD B. (1848-1940). Private, 69th Illinois Infantry; 134th Illinois Infantry. Born in Berlin, New York, and a resident of Illinois, he enlisted on May 19, 1864, mustered into the 134th Illinois on May 31, and mustered out after 100 days on October 25, 1864. He studied at the Eastman National Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. As per his obituary in The New York Times, which confirms his Civil War service, he first served with the 69th Illinois but the dates of that service are not known.

In civilian life, Streeter was the Western sales agent for the Jackson Wagon Company in 1870, then became involved in the cattle business two years later. In 1873, he became a partner in the Streeter & Dinison Ridgewood Brewery in Brooklyn; he became its president in 1908. In addition, he was a director of the Loop Valley Land Company cattle ranch in Nebraska from 1878 to 1900. Streeter was also a trustee of Brooklyn’s Bushwick Savings Bank from 1884 to 1892, director of the Manufacturers National Bank of Brooklyn from 1899 to 1914 and of the Manufacturers Trust Company from 1914 to 1922. He was a founder of the North Side Bank in Brooklyn. Streeter was also trustee and president of the Eastern District Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary, the president of the Free Library in Berlin, New York, and a member of the New York and Long Island Historical Societies. A Freemason, he also belonged to the New England Historic Genealogical Society and the Society of Genealogists of London.

In pursuit of his genealogical studies, he wrote Descendants of Stephen and Ursula Streeter, 1642, and with W. F. Wycoff, The Wycoff Family in America. On January 22, 1923, he had his wife were listed in a New York Times article as among 700 cruisers who were embarking on a world cruise on the Empress of France, a journey covering 30,000 miles. He last lived at 113 Hooper Street in Brooklyn. Section 141, lot 21363.

STRICKLAND, WILLIAM PETER (1809-1884). Chaplain, 48th New York Infantry. A native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Strickland was educated at the University of Ohio at Athens, and entered the Methodist Episcopal ministry in 1832. He became an agent of the American Bible Society, earned a Doctor of Divinity degree from Ohio University in 1850, and moved to New York in 1856 where he was employed by a Methodist book concern. A prolific writer, he published numerous works including History of the American Bible Society (1849, 1856); History of Methodist Missions (1850); A Manual of Biblical Literature (1853); and The Astrologer of Chaldea (1856).

During the Civil War, Strickland, like many Northern Evangelicals believed that serving the Union was “the most sacred duty of every liberty-loving American citizen.” He enlisted at Brooklyn on July 24, 1861, was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 48th New York as chaplain, and resigned on June 13, 1863. He was stationed at Port Royal, South Carolina. His muster roll indicates that he was re-commissioned as chaplain on October 15, 1863, but there are no further details. In 1866, he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Bridgehampton, Long Island. He last lived in Ocean Grove, New Jersey. Section 73, lot 8310.

 

 

 

STRINGER, ROBERT (1841-1879). Corporal, 1st New York Mounted Rifles, Companies M, G, and H. Originally from Ireland, Stringer enlisted at New York City as a private on August 12, 1862, the same date that he mustered into Company M of the 1st New York Mounted Rifles. He was promoted to corporal of Company M at some point. On April 12, 1863, he was taken prisoner of war at Suffolk, Virginia, and paroled after 11 days at City Point, Virginia. Stringer re-enlisted on September 1, 1864, and was listed as deserting while on furlough in New York City on October 8, 1864, the same date that he was reduced in rank to private. His soldier history indicates that he also served in Companies G and H of the 1st Mounted Rifles but the dates of those transfers are unknown. His last residence was 23 Suffolk Street in Manhattan. Section 127, lot 8259, grave 138.


STRINGHAM, SILAS HORTON (1798-1876). Rear admiral, United States Navy. Born in Middletown, New York, Stringham entered the Navy as a midshipman on November 15, 1809, with his appointment to date from June 19, 1810, and served on the frigate President. After being commissioned a lieutenant on December 9, 1814, he served in the Mediterranean and survived being capsized during a rescue mission when a storm hit Gibraltar. He then was on duty off the coast of Africa suppressing the slave trade, returned to North America and engaged in capturing pirates in the West Indies from 1821-24. Stringham was commissioned commander on March 3, 1831, and rose to captain six months later on September 8. After being commandant of the New York Navy Yard in 1844-46, he took part in the bombardment of Vera Cruz aboard the Ohio in 1847, then took charge of the Norfolk Navy Yard from 1848-52, returned to the Mediterranean as a flag officer until 1856, and commanded the Boston Navy Yard from 1856-1860.

When there was a threat of civil war, he was an advisor to President Buchanan and urged relief at Fort Sumter but his advice was not followed in a timely fashion. In May of 1861, he became flag officer of the Atlantic Blockading Squadron with command of 25 vessels and 3,500 men from Key West to Chesapeake Bay, and helped plan and carry out the first naval expedition of the Civil War, the capture of Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina. He conducted this amphibious assault with General Benjamin Butler. This marked the first time during the War that shore batteries were bombarded broadside by wooden vessels. The expedition to Cape Hatteras was successful; the forts were surrendered without loss to Union forces on August 29, 1861. The Confederates lost 12 men, 35 were wounded, 715 were taken prisoner, and large quantities of ammunition and stores were captured. Lieutenant Matthew J. Graham of the 9th New York wrote of that mission, “…The Commodore adopted a system of attack peculiarly his own. Constantly moving his vessels in a circle he discharged his broadsides while abreast of the forts; then quickly swinging around he returned on the other side of the circle out of range of the fire from the forts. Each vessel imitated the action of the flagship, thus making it very difficult for the artillerists in the forts to train their heavy guns with accuracy on a ship in continuous motion…”

After this first Naval victory of the Civil War, Stringham cited his age as the reason for refusing further active duty and retired as commodore on December 21, 1861, disillusioned by the lack of recognition for his tactical plans at Hatteras. Brooklyn citizens gave him a reception at the armory on Pineapple and Hicks Streets; thousands were turned away and many fainted from the crush of people. He returned to the Boston Navy Yard as commandant from 1862-65, was promoted to rear admiral on July 16, 1862, and served as port-admiral of New York from 1870-72. Stringham was the father-in-law of Rear Admiral Johnston B. Creighton who is buried in the same lot. He last lived at 124 Hicks Street in Brooklyn where his funeral attracted officers from the Navy, civic leaders, and neighbors. Section 92, lot 439.

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Silas H. Stringham

Silas H. Stringham

STROHMEYER, AUGUST (1835-1905). Corporal, 131st New York Infantry, Company D. Of German origin, Strohmeyer enlisted as a corporal at New York City on August 27, 1862, mustered into the 131st New York on September 6, and was reduced in rank to private at some point before he deserted on October 15, 1862, at Annapolis, Maryland. His last residence was in Brooklyn. Section 196, lot 31410.

STRONG, CHARLES E. (1839-1911). Corporal, 13th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company F. Strong enlisted as a corporal at Brooklyn on May 26, 1862, served for three months with the 13th Regiment, and mustered out at Brooklyn on September 12. He was a member of the George C. Strong Post#534 of the G.A.R. In 1904, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 1,091,245. As per his obituary in the New York Press, members of the George C. Strong Post were invited to his funeral. His last address was 287 Sixth Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 173, lot 21554, grave 5.

STRONG, GEORGE CROCKETT (1832-1863). Major general, United States Volunteers. Born in Stockbridge, Vermont, he entered Union College in Schenectady, New York, before he was appointed to the United States Military Academy in 1853 from which he graduated in 1857, ranked 3rd in his class of 38, and where he held the post of first captain of cadets for three years. On July 1, 1857, he was brevetted second lieutenant of ordnance, and was commissioned second lieutenant on July 31, 1859. Prior to the outbreak of the Civil War, he was in charge of the Watervliet Arsenal at Troy, New York, whose commanding officer, Colonel Mordecai, was a Southern sympathizer who later tendered his resignation at Strong’s insistence (and at the risk of Strong being court-martialed).

Promoted on January 26, 1861, to first lieutenant, Strong later achieved the rank of captain. On October 1, 1861, he was appointed major and assistant adjutant general of volunteers; that appointment expired on July 17, 1862. According to Jack D. Welsh, M.D., in Medical Histories of Union Generals (1996, p. 324), Strong was in poor health during the summer of 1862, and General Benjamin F. Butler reported that Strong had not fully recovered by that October. Nonetheless, he was promoted to brigadier general in November 1862. He served on the staffs of Generals McDowell and McClellan, and was detailed as ordnance officer by General Butler to the Department of the Gulf. After he was wounded in the right thigh by a shell fragment while commanding his brigade (Department of the South, 10th Corps, Second Brigade) during the attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, on July 30, 1863, the famous attack depicted in the movie Glory which included the black troops of the 54th Massachusetts, he went home to recuperate. Apparently, Strong at first played down the severity of injury, calling it a severe flesh wound. At first he was treated aboard the Cosmopolitan, a hospital steamer, then at a general hospital at Beaufort, South Carolina, and finally boarded a steamer home without permission. (Welsh, page 324) He was promoted to major general on July 18, 1863, but tetanus set in and he died in New York City on July 30. The George C. Strong Post #534 of the G.A.R. in Brooklyn honored his service. His last address was 62 East 19th Street, Manhattan. Section 74, lot 7204.

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George C. Strong

George C. Strong

STRONG, JAMES H. (1814-1882). Commander, United States Navy. Prior to the Civil War, Strong, a New York native, entered the Navy as a midshipman on February 2,1829. He was attached to the Brazil Squadron aboard the sloop Lexington from 1832-33 and then was aboard the Enterprise in 1834. Strong then returned to New York to the Naval School before boarding the frigate Constellation in the West Indies Squadron in 1836, the same year that he was promoted to passed midshipman on June 4. From 1839-1842, Strong returned to the Brazil Squadron. He became a lieutenant as of September 8, 1841, served in the East India Squadron from 1844-1846, then was on the receiving ship New York from 1851-52, went to the Mediterranean Squadron in 1853-55, and commanded the store-ship Relief in 1859.

On April 24, 1861, Strong was promoted to commander, and was at the helm of the steamer Mohawk in the South Atlantic Squadron that year. In 1862, he was in charge of the steamer Flag in the South Atlantic and from 1863-65, was commander of the steam-sloop Monongahela in the Western Gulf Squadron. On November 25, 1863, in conjunction with General Banks, Strong assisted in the capture of Arkansas Pass for which he was commended. The Monongahela then participated at the Battle of Mobile Bay, Alabama, at which time she engaged the Tennessee, a Confederate ram that surrendered at that battle. Continuing in service after the hostilities, he held the rank of captain as of August 5, 1865, was inspector of the New York Navy Yard from 1866-67, was in the European Squadron from 1868-69, rose to commodore on March 2, 1870, and to rear admiral on September 25, 1873. He likely was the father of William Cowenhoven Strong (see). He retired April 25, 1876. Section 75, lot 4011.

 

 

STRONG, WILLIAM COWENHOVEN (1847-1922). Midshipman, United States Navy. Strong enlisted as a midshipman on September 22, 1864. Graduating in June 1868, he rose through the ranks after the Civil War from ensign (April 19, 1869), to master (July 12, 1870), and then attained the rank of lieutenant (June 14, 1874). He retired on July 3, 1896. Most likely, he was the son of James Strong (see). He last lived in Washington, D.C. Section 75, lot 4011.

 

STRONG, WILLIAM KERLEY (1805-1867). Brigadier general, United States Volunteers. Born in Duanesburg, New York, he prospered as a wool merchant and Democratic politician in New York City. He was in Egypt when the Civil War began but immediately headed home, stopping in France where he and General John C. Fremont were able to purchase arms for the Union. Upon his arrival in New York City, he delivered patriotic speeches, and, at the urging of its merchants, Lincoln, on September 28, 1861, appointed him brigadier general of volunteers. He served briefly under Fremont, and was in command at District and Army of West Tennessee, District of Cairo, Illinois. On October 20, 1863, he resigned from the army, and returned to New York City. In November 1863, he negotiated with Secretary of War Edwin Stanton for the enlistment of black troops and a credit to the state’s draft quota. Soon thereafter, while riding in a carriage in Central Park, he was thrown to the ground, and sustained injuries that paralyzed him and ultimately caused his death. He last lived at 254 Fourth Avenue. Section 76, lot 4299.

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STUART, CHARLES (1841-1923). First lieutenant, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company G. Stuart enlisted at Brooklyn as a sergeant on April 25, 1861, and mustered in on May 23. He became a first lieutenant on March 5, 1862, but was not commissioned and was dismissed on September 15, 1862. His last address was on Halsey Street in Brooklyn. Section 16, lot 11001.

STUMPF, JOHN (1839-1914). Corporal, 20th New York Infantry, Companies I and K. Born in Germany, he enlisted as a private at New York City on May 3, 1861, mustered into Company I of the 20th New York on May 6, the same day that he was transferred within the regiment to Company K. He was wounded in action on September 17, 1862, at the Battle of Antietam, Maryland. On April 3, 1863, he was promoted to corporal, and mustered out of service on June 1, 1863, at New York City. His last residence was 781 3rd Avenue, Brooklyn. Section 206, lot 27211.

STURGES, CHARLES L. (1827-1868). Private, 132nd New York Infantry, Company F. Enlisting at New York City as a private on August 7, 1862, he mustered into the 132nd New York on October 4, and mustered out on June 29, 1865, at Salisbury, North Carolina. He died from consumption at his home at 116 East 19th Street in Manhattan. Section 105, lot 6516.

STURGES (or STURGIS), EDWIN CODY (1837-1900). Captain, 101st New York Infantry, Company K; 101st New York Union Brigade, Companies G, E, and F; private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia. Sturges, who was born in New York City, was the son of G. Sturges, a prominent shipping merchant. As per his passport application of 1860, he was 5′ 7¾” tall (although his muster roll says 5′ 6″) with grayish blue eyes, brown hair, a pallid complexion, large nose and mouth, high forehead, round chin and oval face.

His muster roll notes that he first served as a private in the 7th Regiment in 1861 as Edwin C. Sturgis. He re-enlisted as a captain at New York City on November 1, 1861, and was commissioned into Company G of the 101st New York Union Brigade on January 28, 1862. He was transferred within the regiment to Company E and then again to Company F and back to Company E on February 7, 1862. Sturges was commissioned into Company K of the 101st New York Infantry as captain on March 7, 1862, with rank from February 18. He mustered out on December 24, 1862, when the regiment was consolidated with the 37th Infantry. According to his obituary in The New York Times, which confirms his Civil War service, he was a member of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion and the Century Association Club. Sturges’s death certificate lists his occupation as executor and trustee. He died from pneumonia at his home at 141 East 18th Street in Manhattan.

STURGES (or STURGIS), LEWIS (or LOUIS) B. (1841-1894). First lieutenant, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, Companies G, B, and D; private, 3rd Connecticut Infantry, Company C. Sturges served with two Connecticut regiments. He enlisted as a private on April 24, 1861, mustered into the 3rd Connecticut Infantry on May 14, and mustered out on August 12, 1861, at Hartford, Connecticut. He re-enlisted as a second lieutenant on January 13, 1862, and on May 13, was commissioned into the 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, Company G. At some point, he was transferred to Company D. On December 10, 1864, he was promoted to first lieutenant and transferred to Company G. He mustered out at Washington, D.C., on September 25, 1865. Sturges’ last residence was on Surf Avenue in Brooklyn. He died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. Emma Sturges, applied for and was granted a widow’s pension in 1929, certificate 602,400. Section 127, lot 17931, grave 217.

 

 

 

STURGES, STEPHEN BUCKINGHAM (1827-1897). Lieutenant colonel, 1st Ohio Light Artillery. After enlisting as a lieutenant colonel on April 21, 1861, he was immediately commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 1st Ohio Light Artillery, and mustered out on July 27, 1861. On March 9, 1889, he became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. His last address was 305 Washington Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 138, lot 27310.

stylesSTYLES, JOHN H. (1824-1915). Major, 56th Regiment, New York State National Guard; adjutant, 139th New York Infantry; first lieutenant, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company A. Styles enlisted on April 18 at Brooklyn, was commissioned into the 14th on May 23, and was discharged for disability on August 2. He re-enlisted on August 1, 1862, at Brooklyn, as an adjutant, was commissioned into the 139th’s Field and Staff a month later, and was discharged for disability on July 30, 1864. Returning to service at Elmira, New York, he re-enlisted on September 8, 1864, was commissioned as major of the 56th Regiment, and mustered out after 100 days on November 6, 1864, at New York City.

In 1879, Styles’s application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 194,769. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, he was a member of the 14th Regiment Veteran Association and Rankin Post #10 of the G.A.R.; members of both organizations were invited to his funeral and members of the Association of Former Officers of the 14th were requested to assemble in front of the Green-Wood Cemetery gates. He died at the age of 91 at his residence at 1322 Webster Avenue in the Bronx. Section 135, lot 30010, grave 427.

 

 

 

SUCH, BENJAMIN JOHN (1838-1920). First sergeant, 71st Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. A native of New York City, Such first served in Company A of the 71st Regiment, New York State Militia, from April 21, 1861 through September 2, 1861 (no rank indicated on his pension index). He re-enlisted at New York City as a first sergeant on May 28, 1862, mustered immediately into the 71st Regiment, now part of the New York State National Guard, and mustered out after three months on September 2 at New York City. In 1904, his application for a pension was approved under certificate 1,081,465. It is possible that he and John Such (see) were brothers. He last lived in the St. George section of Staten Island. Cemetery records indicate that he died of “interio obstruction.” Section 182, lot 9612.

SUCH, JAMES (or THOMAS) (1837-1863). Private, 71st Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. He was also known as Thomas Such James, Such James, and Thomas Such. According to cemetery records, he was a native of New York who died in Beaufort, South Carolina, on December 5, 1863, of camp fever. It is possible that he and Benjamin Such (see) were brothers. He was interred at Green-Wood on January 4, 1864. Section 182, lot 9612.

SULLIVAN, DANIEL (1828-1896). Private, 42nd New York Infantry, Company K. A native of England, Sullivan enlisted as a private at New York City on August 20, 1861, mustered into the 42nd on September 3, and was discharged for disability on March 3, 1863, at Falmouth, Virginia. He last lived in Brooklyn. Section 69, lot 4747.

sullivan2SULLIVAN, JOHN CLYDE (1848-1906). Drummer boy, 20th Ohio Infantry, Companies H and B. At the age of 14, Sullivan enlisted on April 27, 1861, immediately mustered into Company H of the 20th Ohio, and mustered out on August 18, 1861, at Columbus, Ohio. He re-enlisted that same day, mustered into Company B of the same regiment on September 21, 1861, and was discharged on July 14, 1862. His gravestone indicates that he served as a drummer boy. Section 109, lot 3475.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SULLIVAN, PATRICK H. (1841-1905). Private, 127th New York Infantry, Company G. Of Irish birth, he enlisted at Huntington, Long Island, on August 23, 1862, mustered in on September 8, and served with the 127th until it mustered out on June 30, 1865, at Charleston, South Carolina. At the time of his death, he was a resident of 136 East 62nd Street, New York City. Section 138, lot 27143.

SULZ (or SOLZ), CHARLES W. (or H.) (1826-1862). Corporal, 20th New York Infantry, Company C. A native of Germany and a resident of 3 Wycoff Street in Brooklyn, he enlisted at New York City as a private on May 3, 1861, and mustered into the 20th New York on May 6. He was promoted to corporal on November 30, 1861. Sulz was wounded in battle on September 17, 1862, at Antietam, Maryland, had his arm amputated, and succumbed to erysipelas (bacterial infection) after the surgery on October 15 at a Baltimore hospital. His name and information about his death appeared on the Bodies in Transit List. A Veterans Administration stone was ordered for him early in the 20th century. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 51.

 

 

 

 

 

SULZER, FERDINAND (1842-1870). Sergeant, 54th New York Infantry, Companies C, I, and A. Originally from Germany, Sulzer enlisted on September 29, 1861, at Hudson City, New Jersey, as a private. He mustered into Company C of the 54th New York the next day and was transferred intra-regimentally to Company I on October 4, the same day that he was transferred once again, this time to Company A. On February 11, 1863, he was promoted to corporal. Subsequently, Sulzer became sergeant of Company A on July 1. He was discharged on April 14, 1866, at Charleston, South Carolina. In civilian life, he worked in a saloon. His last residence was 51 East Houston Street in Manhattan. Section G, lot 21524.

SUMMERS, WILLIAM M. (1838-1916). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company H. Born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, he enlisted on April 18, 1861, at Brooklyn, mustered in on May 23, and was discharged for promotion on September 3, 1861, at Arlington, Virginia. In 1907, he applied for and was granted a pension, certificate 1,148,231. He last resided on Hillside Avenue in Hollis, Queens. Priscilla Summers applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1917, certificate 930,532. Section 34, lot 5001.