Civil War Biographies: Price-Ricard

PRICE, GEORGE (1825-1895). Rank unknown, United States Navy. According to a descendant, Price who was born in England, served in the United States Navy during the Civil War. He last lived at 48 Adelphi Street in Brooklyn. Section 137, lot 29503, grave 2.

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PRICE, GEORGE ALLAN (1839-1924). Sergeant major, 9th Illinois Cavalry, Company M; private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company E. Price was born in Vestal, New York; his ancestors were among the first English settlers in Binghamton, New York, then called Point Chenango, and inhabited by the Oneida and Tuscarora Indians. After spending his early years in Broome County, New York, his family moved to New York City when he was twelve. A hatter by trade, he was 5′ 11″ tall with a light complexion, fair hair and blue eyes. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Standard Union, which confirmed his Civil War service, he met Abraham Lincoln on November 6, 1860, when Lincoln was giving a speech at Cooper Union in New York City. Price and a friend climbed into the balcony to shake Lincoln’s hand after the address.

A resident of New York City at the start of the Civil War, Price enlisted there as a private on April 19, 1861, and mustered into Company E of the 7th Regiment three days later. The 7th left Manhattan on the Daylight and upon arrival at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., the ship was met by President Lincoln and Secretary of State William E. Seward. He was discharged on June 3, 1861. After relocating to Iroquois County, Illinois, where his family lived and responding to President Lincoln’s call for 300,000 more men, he re-enlisted at Chicago as a quartermaster sergeant on November 5, 1861, mustered into the 9th Illinois Cavalry on November 30 (a company that he helped raise), and was transferred to the Field and Staff as a master sergeant on January 1, 1862. After fighting in many skirmishes in Missouri and Arkansas, he contracted chronic diarrhea and fever at Little Black River, Missouri, and was discharged for disability on September 1, 1862, at Helena, Arkansas.

Price lived at Loda, Illinois, until the spring of 1863, then moved to Brooklyn where he spent the rest of his life. Employed as a hatter and furrier, he worked for Bigelow & Company for five years until 1869 when he became a partner in Balch, Price and Company which sold “furs and hats, millinery waists and gowns” at two locations in downtown Brooklyn. Remaining active in military affairs, he joined the G.A.R. in 1883 and helped secure the name of the Ulysses S. Grant Post #327. In 1885, he served in the honor guard for the funeral ceremonies for President Ulysses S. Grant at Albany, New York. Initially the adjutant, he became the post’s commander in 1889, a year in which the Post welcomed fifty-two comrades, the largest number ever welcomed in one year. He was also instrumental that year in presenting a flag and staff to every one of the eighty-one schools in Brooklyn at a ceremony at the Academy of Music attended by representatives from all the schools, a color guard of five students, three boys and two girls. Price also sponsored parties, camp-fires and public receptions during his tenure as commander. He was also involved in starting the tradition of wearing boutonnieres for the Memorial Day parade to honor fallen soldiers.

A member of the 7th Regiment’s War Veterans Association, Price was Civil Service Commissioner of Brooklyn in 1898 and 1904, as well as Republican Presidential elector from the Sixth Congressional District. In 1906, he applied for and received a pension for partial disability, certificate 1,124,011. On December 15, 1912, an article “Col. Price Planned Bridges Long Ago” was published in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, noting that Price’s letters to the Eagle dated February 1866 and January 1867 advocated the building of a bridge from Flatbush Avenue across the East River. Price suggested that the bridge should be no longer than necessary to “oblige the largest number of citizens.” He proposed:

… First, The bridge will be one-fifth shorter. Second, It will start from high central ground in Brooklyn and end on equally high central ground in New York. Third, It can be built on the Niagara plan (two tiers) by having the upper story start from Sands Street and end at East Broadway, and the lower start from Prospect Street and end at Henry Street, New York. Fourth, It will relieve Broadway more than any plan now before the public, by drawing nearly all the business above Worth Street over the bridge. Fifth, With the opening of Flatbush Avenue the cities of New York and Brooklyn will have a magnificent thoroughfare from the west side of one city to the southeast side of the other, leading directly to our park. Sixth, it will give Brooklyn a broad way for business. Seventh, it will give a fine approach to both ends of the bridge, which it has not at present, and will cost less than the ones now proposed. There are other advantages that could be mentioned, but I will not trespass further on your time and space, but merely state that on a line east and west and south of the Hall of Records there are now five excellent ferries running to Brooklyn, enough to accommodate all the business that will ever be done between that part of New York and Brooklyn.

Price’s other letters expanded on his first plan stressing that Brooklyn would gain a wide business street, its Broadway, after construction of the bridge. He stressed that he had no financial interest in the bridge and was only interested in the improvement of the two cities. According to a descendant, he was a Republican elector in the 1904 presidential election and cast his vote for President Theodore Roosevelt. Another article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on August 24, 1913, reported that Price would attend the forty-seventh annual encampment of the G.A.R. at Chattanooga, Tennessee, on September 15-20 as a representative of both the U. S. Grant Post and as one of the seven members of the Council of Administration of the National Grand Army of the Republic. That article also noted that Price was grand marshal of the parade when a statue of General Grant was unveiled on Grant Square opposite the headquarters of the Union League Club.

On November 4, 1914, Price was honored at a dinner given by members of the Grant Post in celebration of his 75th birthday and devotion to the Post for thirty-one years. The invitation notes that the party was for Grant comrades only and that every member was urged “to testify his love for Comrade Price by being with him and us upon that occasion.” He was given a three-handled silver loving cup that bore the inscription, “A brave soldier in the time of war; a model citizen in time of peace.” All the tributes given that night were included in a program. Poems, remembrances and tributes such as the following were included in the booklet:

…The ties of friendship welded in the fire of battle cannot be easily broken—as we grow older they become stronger. It is fitting as we approach the great divide that we should pause here and there to pay a tribute of love and devotion to a comrade while we can grasp his hand and look into his answering eyes. Comrade Price, I count it a privilege and honor to be here and say these few words and to wish for you many happy returns of the day and that we may have the privilege of giving you another dinner on your 85th birthday….”

In September 1916, he was elected president of his firm where he was beloved by his employees. Among the many civic and social organizations to which Price belonged were the Oxford and Union League Clubs, the Manhattan Chamber of Commerce, and the Montauk and Crescent Athletic Clubs. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, members of the Ulysses S. Grant Post #327 were requested to attend his funeral in uniform; G.A.R. rituals were performed at the services. His funeral was held at the Grant Post of the G.A.R., and at which members of the 7th Regiment were in attendance. Newspapers in Binghamton, New York, were asked to publish information about his death. He last resided at 18 Montgomery Place, in Brooklyn. Price died from acute bronchitis. Section 142, lot 34197.

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PRICE, HENRY FREDERICK (1837-1895). United States Navy; unknown soldier history. Born in England, Price immigrated to New York in 1851. According to a descendant, he served in the Navy aboard the Carondolet and was wounded in action. After he recovered, he joined the Union Army, was captured and held as a prisoner in Andersonville, Georgia. Other details of his military record are not known. He last resided at 217 47th Street in Brooklyn. Section 15, lot 17263, grave 580.

PRICHARD (or PRITCHARD, PRETCHARD, PRUCHARD), JOHN HENRY (1846-1915). Private, 5th New York Infantry; 165th New York Infantry, Company A. A native of New York City, Prichard lived there as per the New York State census of 1855. He enlisted as a private at New York City on September 19, 1862, and mustered into an unassigned company of the 5th New York. As per his muster roll, which refers to his service in the 165th New York, he was a clerk who was 5′ 5½” tall with hazel eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion. Apparently, he had no service in the 5th New York; his pension index card notes that he served in Company A of the 165th New York from September 17, 1862. He mustered into his company on November 28, 1862, and was discharged on May 24, 1865, from a hospital in New Orleans, Louisiana.

After marrying in 1873, Prichard lived at 341 Garden Street in Hoboken in 1878 and in Jersey City in 1879 and 1880. The 1880 Jersey City Directory notes that he was in the trunk business; the 1880 census reports that he was a trunk maker living in Hoboken with his wife and three children. He continued to live in Jersey City in 1891 and 1892 but moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey, in 1895. In 1892, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 855,647. As per the 1900 census, he had been married twenty-seven years and lived at 337 West 45th Street in Manhattan. The 1910 census reports that he had seven children, could read and write, was a leather salesman and a veteran of the Union Army. In 1910, he lived at 305 West 55th Street in Manhattan, his last residence. His death was attributed to endocarditis. Shortly after his death in 1915, Elizabeth Prichard applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 799,880. Section 203, lot 26647, grave 2.

PRIME, JR., EDWARD (1833-1915). Sergeant, 71st Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company F. A native of New York City, Prime enlisted as a sergeant on May 27, 1862, immediately mustered into Company F of the 71st National Guard, and mustered out of service on September 2 of that year at New York City. He last resided at The Buckingham Hotel, 50th Street and Fifth Avenue, Manhattan. Section 100, lot 915.

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PRIME, FREDERICK EDWARD (1829-1900). Colonel and lieutenant colonel and major by brevet; major, 1st United States Engineers. Born in Florence, Italy, his grandfather, Nathaniel Prime, was head of the banking house of Prime, Ward and King, the largest bank in New York at that time. His father, Rufus Prime of Huntington, Long Island, was a well-known merchant and scholar. Prime graduated first in the class of 1850 from the United States Military Academy, and was assigned to the Engineering Corps after his graduation. A second lieutenant, he built coastal fortifications in New York (including Fort Schuyler), California (Alcatraz Island), Alabama, and Mississippi.

At the onset of the Civil War in 1861, Prime was captured by Confederate forces at Pensacola on his way to Fort Pickens, Florida. After his involvement at the Battle of Bull Run, Virginia, he was engaged in fortifying the defenses of Baltimore, Maryland. He was promoted to captain on August 6, 1861, and then became Chief Engineer of the Departments of Kentucky, the Cumberland, and the Ohio. Wounded during a reconnaissance mission near Mill Spring, Kentucky, on December 5, he was taken as a prisoner of war. On January 9, 1862, J. G. Totten, Chief of Engineers, wrote to Major General McClellan at headquarters about the capture and described Prime as “a young man of fine endowments and with much vigor and enterprise of character,” and hoped for his exchange.

After his parole in the spring of 1862, Prime served in the Mississippi Campaign under General Grant in 1862-63. On October 4, 1862, he was brevetted to major for “gallant and meritorious conduct in the Battle of Corinth, Mississippi.” One of his projects, the construction of a canal at Duckport was deemed unsuccessful by Prime in his report of May 1863. Promoted to major on June 1, 1863, he distinguished himself at Vicksburg, Mississippi, and was brevetted to lieutenant colonel on July 4 of that year for his “gallant and meritorious service during the Siege of Vicksburg.” Prime declined an appointment to brigadier general of United States Volunteers on August 4, 1863. In his report of November 29, 1863, he described his actions at Vicksburg, notably Logan’s approach, where efforts were made to command a salient that would withstand enemy attacks. On October 3, 1863, he became superintending engineer of the temporary defenses at New Haven, Connecticut, and Narragansett Bay. Remaining on the East coast, he was in charge of fortifications at Staten Island, repairs at Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, as of March 19, 1864, then was at Sandy Hook, New Jersey, where fortifications were constructed. During this time, he was also recruiting for engineers in New York City from November 2, 1864, until January 23, 1866. He was brevetted to colonel on March 13, 1865, for gallant and meritorious service but declined a brevet to brigadier general on that date.

After the War, Prime worked with other engineers at Willets Point, New York, and then made improvements at the mouth of the Mississippi River and surveyed the harbor at Galveston, Texas. He retired on September 5, 1871, as a brigadier general, citing disability contracted while in service. A resident of Huntington, Long Island, he died in Litchfield, Connecticut. Section 100, lot 239, grave 20.

PRIME, HENRY (1847-1914). Private, 192nd New York Infantry, Company D. Born in New York City, he enlisted as a private at Albany, New York, on March 28, 1865, mustered into the 192nd on that date, and mustered out at Cumberland, Maryland, on August 28, 1865. His last residence was in Hempstead, Long Island. Section 100, lot 915.

PRIME, NATHANIEL EDWARD (1830-1885). Lieutenant colonel and major by brevet; captain, 17th Infantry, United States Army. New York City-born, Prime enlisted as a first lieutenant at New York City on May 14, 1861, and was immediately commissioned into an unknown company of the 17th Infantry, United States Army. Rising through the ranks, he was promoted to quartermaster on November 2, 1861, and then became captain on August 9, 1862. At Spotsylvania Courthouse, Virginia, he was promoted by brevet to major on August 1, 1864. He was subsequently promoted by brevet to lieutenant colonel at the Wilderness, Virginia. Remaining in the United States Army after the Civil War, he transferred into the 26th Infantry of the United States Army on September 21, 1866,. He resigned his commission on March 20, 1879, as a lieutenant colonel. His last residence was 39 West 31st Street in Manhattan. Section 100, lot 915.

Nathaniel Prime
Nathaniel Prime

PRINGLE, JAMES B. (1846-1933). Private, 3rd New York Light Artillery, Battery B. Born in Brooklyn, Pringle enlisted as a private on September 4, 1862, at City Hall Park (enlistment office pictured below), and mustered into the 3rd New York Light Artillery. His pension records note that he was a bookbinder apprentice at the time of his enlistment. His unit left Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, and moved to Morehead City, North Carolina, where the regiment was stationed. Then, on January 9, 1863, he was selected to join a group of six soldiers and go up river for 15 miles to Stones River in order to scout out Confederate troop movements. On this mission, Pringle helped disabled two Confederate field pieces and drive off 20 Confederate Cavalry troopers trying to rescue the field pieces before their destruction. In 1863, after participating in engagements at Folly Island and Morris Island, South Carolina, he headed for Honey Hill in that state, where in November, a horse was shot out from under him and he was wounded in the thigh by a Minie ball, causing him to miss five weeks of action. His pension records indicate that he also suffered from dysentery in October 1863 and was kicked by a horse on April 8, 1864.

In January of 1865, he and six others were selected for a secret mission on the Stone River where they had to jump their horses off a boat and surprise the enemy. On February 28, 1865, he was selected by his lieutenant to go with 14 other soldiers of 3rd New York to enter Charleston, South Carolina, and take the secessionist governor into custody. This expedition continued until May 27, 1865, when Governor McGrath was found in Columbia, South Carolina, placed under arrest, and returned to Charleston as a prisoner. All 14 members of this unit were given written citations for this detail. He mustered out at Syracuse, New York, on July 13, 1865, after the termination of the War. Among the many engagements in which Pringle took part included these in North Carolina in 1862: Rawle’s Mills, Deep Gully, Southwest Creek, Kingston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro. He fought in South Carolina in 1863 at Seabrook, Fort Sumter, Fort Wagner, and Morris Island; in 1864, at St. John’s Island, Pocataligo, Honey Hill and James’s Island; and at Ashapoo in 1865.

On September 4, 1865, Pringle joined Company H of the 8th Regiment, New York State National Guard, and served from 1865 to 1874 as a private, transferring into Company D at some point. He married Sarah Ann Seares at St. Peter’s Church in Manhattan in 1866. During his National Guard service, he saw action in the Orange Riots in New York City (1870-1871) and in the Railroad Riots in Syracuse, New York. A member of the G.A.R.’s Ulysses S. Grant Post #327, joining in 1883, he was a member of the honor guard when President Ulysses S. Grant’s remains lay in state at City Hall, New York City.

Pringle began his claim for an invalid pension on June 23, 1880, noting that a gunshot wound to his left thigh, suffered at Honey Hill, South Carolina, interfered with his trade as a book-edge gilder because he has to stand continually at his job. He noted that he was treated at the field hospital for about five weeks. The petition was denied by the medical examiner on February 20, 1883, who indicated that it was not a pensionable medical disability.

On February 26, 1897, Pringle filed again for an invalid pension, alleging permanent disability and specifying a wound to his left leg, rheumatism and a diseased heart. On October 10, 1901, he added that he had stomach trouble, back trouble and throat trouble in addition to the aforementioned maladies. His claim was rejected by the medical examiner on May 23, 1902, indicating that a notable degree of disability was not shown according to the Pension Act of June 27, 1890. Pringle reapplied for a pension in 1905. As per claim number 384,383, he noted that he was a widower with eight living children living at 5301 Third Avenue in Brooklyn. He stated that he was 5′ 9″ tall, weighed 155 pounds, had a wound on his right hand and on his left thigh (from Honey Hill). He was then working as a book-edge gilder. A Surgeon’s Certificate, dated July 11, 1905, and in his pension records, notes that Pringle stated that he suffered from loss of hearing and discharge from right ear, defective eyesight, a weak heart dating 13 years, asthma for the last 15 years, and piles (hemorrhoids). In addition, Pringle had previously suffered from a broken ankle and malaria, and noted a leg wound dating to 1864 and throat disease since his wartime service. Pringle then weighed 143 pounds and was 5′ 8¼” tall with mixed brown hair. At that time, the surgeon noted no evidence of throat disease and only a scar on his left leg but indicated that his distal joints on his fingers were enlarged which was evidence of rheumatism.

When he continued to apply for a pension in 1907, as per the Act of February 6, 1907, the application was denied because he did not know his exact age. Pringle wrote that he did not know his exact age because he was orphaned at age six but believed it was in 1844 (other records state 1846). In 1907, he lived at 1023 57th Street in Brooklyn. At the time of this pension application, he was 5′ 5″ tall with light complexion, black eyes, black hair and worked as a bookbinder. Pringle also submitted evidence, written by a notary public, from his dictated statement that he was wounded at Honey Hill, Georgia (sic), on November 30, 1864, and was treated by a surgeon from a “Colored Regiment” in the field. He could not provide evidence from witnesses because he had lost contact with comrades and did not know their whereabouts.

Ultimately, the rejections were overturned and he received a pension under certificate 1,152,299, in September 1908, at $12 per month, when his date of birth was adjusted to June 28, 1846.  In 1909, when he was living at 5223 Third Avenue in Brooklyn, his pension remained at $12 per month. The pension was increased as of the Act of May 11, 1912, to $24 per month as of June 28, 1916, and $30 per month as of June 28, 1921.

Pringle last lived with his daughter at 1641 Palisade Avenue in Fort Lee, New Jersey; he lived with her as of 1912. His death certificate reports that he was a retired bookbinder. As per his obituary, which notes his Civil War service, he was a widower survived by three married daughters, one of whom lived in Fort Lee, two sons, 26 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren; his pension record indicates that he fathered 10 children and that his wife died in 1896. His death was attributed to myocardial insufficiency and senility. The bill for his funeral totaled $399.00, including $175.00 for a chestnut casket, five limousines and flower carriage at $96.00. As per an affidavit filed by his daughter, Charity Katz, and in his pension records, he left no personal property or real estate.  The paperwork indicated that as of June 15, 1933, he required regular medical assistance that was tendered by Dr. Sandler, who was paid $136, and his two daughters, Charity and Laura Mason. His last pension check was for $67.50. Section 135, lot 14964, grave 166.

James B. Pringle
City Hall Park, Site of Temporary Recruiting Station.
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PRINGLE, WILLIAM (1823-1897). Private, 1st Mississippi Infantry, Company D, Confederate States of America. Born in Scotland, he enlisted on August 24, 1861, at Hernando, Mississippi, and mustered in on August 27 at Iuka to Johnston’s 1st Mississippi Infantry. He was discharged on September 19, 1861. On February 16, 1862, again serving in the 1st Mississippi, he was captured at Fort Donelson, Tennessee. As of June, 1862, he was still listed as a prisoner of war being held at Camp Marion, Indiana. His last residence was 288 Clinton Avenue, in West Hoboken, New Jersey. Section 156, lot 20149, grave 1.

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PROSS, FREDERICK (1821-1862). Captain, 31st New York Company H. Pross was born in Germany. According to the 1860 census, he was living in Manhattan and was employed as a barber.  He was a member of the police force when he enlisted at New York City as a first lieutenant on May 8, 1861, and was commissioned into the 31st New York (the Montezuma Regiment) on May 27. At the time of his enlistment, Pross was 5′ 8″ tall with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion. On June 9, 1861, an article in The New York Times states that an elegant sword was presented to Pross by the members of the 17th Police Precinct in appreciation of and in testament to the high esteem in which the was held. He was promoted to captain on April 5, 1862, with rank from March 20, but did not muster in at that rank. At the Battle of West Point, Virginia, on May 7, 1862, he was killed in action by a rifle ball that passed through his head; he was interred at Green-Wood on May 25, 1862. Pross’s death was noted in General John Newton’s after action report. Newton stated that the 31st and 32nd Regiments, assigned to the left flank at that battle, suffered the greatest losses in a valiant effort to advance their position in the woods and the 31st lost many officers, non-commissioned officers and privates.

The superintendent of the Metropolitan Police Force on May 22, 1862, issued Special Order #129 which was printed in The New York Times, “In accordance with the recommendation of the Committee of Arrangements for the funeral of Lieutenant Frederick Pross (who resigned his membership in the force to volunteer in the military service of the country), of Company F, thirty-first regiment New York State Volunteers, who was killed at the head of his company at the battle of West Point, you will parade on Sunday, 25th inst., with two sergeants and twenty-five patrolmen-captain and sergeants in full uniform, with belts and batons, patrolmen full uniform, except batons. Drill Instructor Captain Turnbull is assigned to the command of the force upon this occasion, to be assisted by such aids as he may designate.” A police procession assembled at Washington Square Park in Manhattan, continued down Broadway to South Ferry, crossed into Brooklyn and marched to the Hamilton Avenue ferry. Flags at station houses were ordered to fly at half-staff. His obituary in The New York Times confirms his membership in the 17th Police Precinct and notes that bells at City Hall and other buildings tolled while his body was escorted down to the ferry in a funeral procession.

According to a descendant, three of Pross’s sons served in the Civil War and one, Frederick Jr., was held at Andersonville Prison. In 1862, Elizabeth Pross, his widow who was left to raise five minor children, applied for and received a pension of $17 a month, certificate 3,560. (She applied for and received an increase in 1873.) As indicated by a descendant, the Police Department raised the funds for a marble marker for him. Because that gravestone has become unreadable over time, a granite Veterans Administration gravestone has been installed in front of it. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 15.

PROVOT, PAUL (1826-1900). Paymaster, 55th Regiment, New York State National Guard. Of French birth, he enlisted and mustered into the 55th Regiment’s Field and Staff as paymaster on June 24, 1863, at New York City, and mustered out on July 27 after serving 30 days. His last residence was on Pulaski Street in Brooklyn. Section 164, lot 16487, grave 8.

PRYER (or PRYOR), JOHN T. (or F.) (1836-1904). Second lieutenant, 82nd New York Infantry, Company A; private, 83rd New York Infantry, Company C. Born in New York State, he enlisted as a private at New York City on May 27, 1861, mustered into the 83rd New York that day, and was discharged for promotion on about January 15, 1862. He re-enlisted at New York City as a second lieutenant on February 7 of that year, and was commissioned into the 82nd New York on March 1. At some point during his service, he was wounded. He was discharged on November 24, 1862. On December 2, 1879, he became a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, J. A. Dix Post #135 in New York City. It is likely that he was a brother of William Pryer (see). Although he died from acute dilation of the heart in Boston, he last lived in Manhattan at 144 West 105th Street. Section 67, lot 1649.

PRYER, WILLIAM CHARDAVOYNE (1834-1908.) Acting assistant surgeon, United States Army. A native of New York City, he was likely the brother of John Pryer (see). William Pryer was injured while sailing his yacht, resulting in a permanent impairment to his hip. In spite of his disability, he attended Columbia College and was a graduate of its College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1862. During his studies, he was praised as an anatomist and dissector and wrote an acclaimed thesis about hernias. His first assignment was at Bellevue Hospital where he was the house surgeon.

In 1863, Pryer entered the United States Army as an acting assistant surgeon, was stationed at De Camp General Hospital on David’s Island, New York Harbor, and remained at this post until the end of the Civil War in 1865. His disabilities prevented him from becoming a commissioned officer. After relocating to New Rochelle, New York, he continued his medical career and was a founding member of the New York State Medical Association and the Westchester County Medical Society. In 1902, he was thrown from his horse-drawn carriage, re-injuring his hip and fracturing two ribs. The accident, which confined him to bed for four months, effectively ended his medical practice which he pursued unless interrupted by illness. His last address was in New Rochelle. At his funeral, the pastor said in part, “…His entire life and professional career show the triumph of will-power over bodily weakness and constant suffering….” Section 67, lot 1649.

PUFFER, EDWARD HOLMES (1832-1876). Private, 4th Ohio Cavalry, Companies D and F. Puffer enlisted on November 8, 1861, as a private, and mustered into Company D of the 4th Ohio Cavalry on November 25, 1861. During his service, he transferred intra-regimentally into Company F. His last residence was at 178 Livingston Street, Brooklyn. Section 77, lot 551.

PULLMAN, JOHN (1840-1916). Private, 8th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company A. Of Irish birth, he enlisted at New York City on May 29, 1862, mustered immediately into the 8th New York State Militia for three months of service, and mustered out with his company on September 10 at New York City. His death was caused by angina pectoris. Section 187, lot 18680.

PUMELL (or PINNELL), JAMES E. (1825-1865). Private, 67th United States Colored Infantry (USCT), Company C. Pumell, who was born in New York, was a private in the 67th USCT. All privates in the USCT were African-American. In March 1864, the 67th USCT was moved from Benton Barracks, Missouri, to Port Hudson, Louisiana, and saw action at Mt. Pleasant Landing on May 15, 1864. Remaining in Louisiana, the regiment moved to Morganza in June 1864, was engaged at Sara Bayou on September 6-7, 1864, and returned to Port Hudson on June 1, 1865. The details of Pumell’s service are unknown. He died at his residence, 39 Rivington Street, Manhattan. Section B, lot 9895, grave 768.

PURCELL, EDWARD LOCKMORE (1837-1892). Private, 1st New Jersey Infantry, Company H; 8th New Jersey Infantry, Company D. After enlisting as a private on April 30, 1861, he immediately mustered into the 1st New Jersey and mustered out on July 31 of that year at Newark, New Jersey. He re-enlisted the next month on August 29, mustered that day into the 8th New Jersey, and mustered out on September 21, 1864, at Trenton, New Jersey. According to his obituary in The New York Times, he served under Generals McClellan, Burnside, Pope, Hooker, Grant, and Meade, and fought at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, in the Peninsula and Petersburg Campaigns, and at the Wilderness, Virginia. In 1877, he applied for an invalid pension that was granted under certificate 153,864. He last lived in New Jersey. His death was caused by paralysis. Section 84, lot 1569.

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PUTNAM, ATLEE (1828-1863). Captain and assistant quartermaster, United States Army Quartermaster’s Department; first lieutenant, 7th Infantry, United States Army. Born in Massachusetts, Putnam enlisted as a second lieutenant on April 26, 1861, was immediately commissioned into the 7th Infantry, United States Army, and was promoted to first lieutenant the next month on May 16, 1861. He was discharged for promotion on August 3, 1861, and entered the United States Army Quartermaster’s Department as captain and assistant quartermaster on that day. On May 2, 1863, he died of bilious fever at New Orleans, Louisiana, and was interred at Green-Wood on November 24 of that year. Section 20, lot 4478.

QUACKENBUSH, GEORGE W. (1832-1889). Second lieutenant, 133rd New York Infantry, Company A. Born in New York City, he enlisted there as a second lieutenant on August 12, 1862. On September 24, he was commissioned into the 133rd New York and was discharged on December 2, 1862. After the War, he joined the police force, and then the Fire Department, where he rose to foreman. Quackenbush is listed as a fireman in the 1877 New York City Directory; at that time, he lived at 162 Franklin Street in Manhattan. He was an active member of the G.A.R.’s Veteran Post #436. His last residence 644 Ninth Avenue in Manhattan. Quackenbush’s death was caused by valvular disease of the heart.  Section 6, lot 20118, grave 572.

QUACKENBUSH (or QUAKENBUSCH), HENRY L. (1842-1923). Private, 6th New York Heavy Artillery, Company H. Quackenbush enlisted as a private at Morrisania (then part of Westchester), New York, on August 26, 1862, and mustered into the 6th Heavy Artillery on September 2. (The regiment was originally part of the 135th New York.) On May 30, 1864, he was wounded in action at Bethesda Church, Virginia, and eventually was sent to McDougal Hospital in New York before he returned to his unit on October 31, 1864. He mustered out on June 28, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia. According to his descendant, he returned to Morrisania and held a fireman’s certificate in 1867. Relocating to New York City, he was employed as an iron molder. His application for an invalid pension was granted in 1879, certificate 168,331. His last residence was on 8th Street in Brooklyn. Section 114, lot 8999, grave 188.

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QUEVEDO, JOSEPH (1845-1895). Corporal, 52nd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company K. Quevedo served as a corporal with the 52nd National Guard for 30 days in 1863. He last resided on Poplar Street in Brooklyn where he died from cirrhosis. Section 92, lot 2869.

QUICK, ROBERT H. (1830-1898). Private, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company F. Details of Quick’s record are not known. He is listed in the records of Henry M. Lee Post #21 of G.A.R. as having served in the 13th New York State Militia. His death was caused by phthisis, (tuberculosis.) Section 84, lot 7827.

QUIGLEY, DANIEL (1843-1908). Private, 8th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A; landsman, United States Navy. Quigley, who was born in Ireland, served with the 8th Regiment for three months in 1861. He enlisted in the Navy on August 9, 1861, and served as a landsman on the USS Powhatan and the USS North Carolina. On September 9, 1863, he suffered a gunshot wound to his right elbow during a night attack at Fort Sumter, South Carolina, while serving with the Powhatan, and was taken prisoner. Quigley was held at the Confederate hospital in Charleston, South Carolina, then in prison camps at Salisbury, North Carolina; Andersonville, Georgia; and Danville, Virginia. He was discharged from service on October 24, 1864. He received a Navy pension, certificate 1,741, because of his injured elbow. His last residence was 627 Halsey Street in Brooklyn. After his death from nephritis, Harriet Quigley applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 19,123. Section 11, lot 8663, grave 6.

QUIGLEY, THOMAS (1835-1869). Private, 88th New York Infantry, Company E. A native of Ireland, he enlisted at New York City as a private on May 5, 1864, mustered into the 88th New York the same day, and deserted at an unknown place after a medical furlough expired on February 5, 1865. His last residence was 62 West Washington Place in Manhattan. His death was caused by phthisis. Section 127, Lot 8259, grave 47.

QUINN, GEORGE F. (1836-1871). First lieutenant, 115th New York Infantry, Companies I and K. Originally from England, he enlisted as a sergeant at Buffalo, New York, on August 27, 1862, and mustered into Company I of the 155th on November 19. He rose to first sergeant on April 15, 1863, and then became a sergeant major on June 1, 1863, effective upon his transfer to the Field and Staff on that date. On April 13, 1864, he was promoted to second lieutenant effective upon his transfer to Company K on August 1. Later that month, he was severely wounded at Reams’ Station, Virginia, on August 25, necessitating the amputation of his right arm. Although promoted to first lieutenant on November 23, 1864, he did not muster in that rank and was discharged for wounds on January 18, 1865. His last residence was in Hudson City, New Jersey. Quinn died of enteritis. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 315.

QUINN, JOHN (1848-1915). Sergeant, 10th New York Infantry, Company F. Quinn, who was born in Ireland, served with the 10th New York, enlisting as a private and mustering out as a sergeant. No further details are known. In 1892, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 846,296. His last address was 218 21st Street in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to nephritis. Section 143, lot 28265, grave 1.

RAAB, JR., GEORGE (1844-1879). Private, 15th New York Heavy Artillery, Company C. Born in New York City, Raab enlisted at Fort Lyon, Virginia, as a private, on January 27, 1864. On that date, he mustered into the 15th Heavy Artillery, Battery C, from which he was discharged on August 22, 1865, at Washington, D.C. In 1879, he applied for an invalid pension that was granted under certificate 1,102,824. His last residence was 804 Lexington Avenue in Manhattan. Section 59, lot 3798.

RAAB, WILLIAM (1835-1871). Private, 11th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company C. A German native, he enlisted on May 28, 1862, at New York City, mustering into his company on the same day. Raab mustered out on September 16, 1862, at New York City. He is listed as a machinist in the 1865 Brooklyn Directory living at Carroll Street and Third Avenue in Brooklyn. He last lived at 286 Third Avenue in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to consumption. Section 86, lot 18066, grave 82.

RABERG, JR., CHARLES H. (1838-1905). Private, 37th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company G. A New Yorker by birth, Raberg served for 30 days with the 37th Regiment in 1864. On March 22, 1866, he became a second lieutenant in his company. Records from his 1866 promotion indicate that he resided in New York City at that time. Raberg is listed as a clerk in the New York City Directory for 1876-1878. He last lived at 1931 Madison Avenue in Manhattan. His death was attributed to softening of the brain. Section 61, lot 1303, grave 10.

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RACEY, WILLIAM HENRY (1833-1892). First lieutenant, 53rd New York Infantry, Company I; private, 71st Regiment, New York State Militia, Company G. Racey, who was born in Manhattan, mustered into the 71st Regiment as a private on April 21, 1861, and served for three months in the company known as William S. Dunham’s Company G. A butcher by trade, he was 5′ 7¼” with brown hair and eyes. A soldier-correspondent during the War, one of his letters to the newspaper, the Sunday Mercury, dated June 15, 1861, that described his hopes of claiming a secession flag in Maryland, was published recently in Sunday Mercury: Writing and Fighting in the Civil War. His company fought at First Bull Run, Virginia, on July 21, 1861.

Subsequently commissioned into the 53rd New York on September 25, 1861, Racey was promoted to first lieutenant three months later on December 16. This regiment was organized in August 1861 and referred to as the D’Epineuil Zouaves. (D’Epineuil, a Frenchman, was instrumental in assembling the unit known for its splendid uniforms of French inspiration manufactured by Brooks Brothers.) The 53rd left New York City by ship on November 18, 1861, en route to an attempted invasion of North Carolina led by General Burnside. The transport ship, the John Trucks, carried 700 men (400 over capacity) and provisions for eight days, but was at sea for 34 days, including a severe storm. This initiative was abandoned because the ship’s draft was too deep and the vessel returned to Annapolis on February 6, 1862. During that futile expedition, Racey was an acting captain. He mustered out on March 21 at Washington, D.C., when his unit was disbanded.

Soon after, Racey applied to New York’s Governor Morgan for permission to raise a company to take into the field; however, that permission was denied. Offered a commission as an officer in a Massachusetts regiment, he declined and instead returned to New Berne, North Carolina, where he organized a fire department, having served as a volunteer fireman in New York City since 1855, and was foreman of its Engine 40. He became foreman and then chief engineer. When New Berne was attacked by Confederates, Racey was given command of 700 men in the breastworks. While in New Berne, he was reportedly a Union scout and spy. In 1864, due to sickness, he went back to New York City.

After the Civil War, Racey moved from Brooklyn to Cranford, New Jersey, and was one of the town’s founding fathers. Originally part of Westfield, he petitioned the legislature in Trenton in 1871 to create the township of Cranford. Meanwhile, he continued to commute to his job as an insurance agent and broker in New York City. Remaining active in military affairs, he was a member of the Henry M. Lee Post #21 of the G.A.R., the 71st Veterans Association, and the Loyal Legion. He also belonged to the Winfield Scott Post #73 of the G.A.R. in Plainfield, New Jersey, and the Major Anderson Post #109 of the G.A.R., also in Plainfield and the Society of the Army of the Potomac which he joined in 1883. In 1885, he was part of the honor guard at Grant’s funeral proceedings at City Hall in Manhattan. Racey last resided in Montclair, New Jersey. He died of exhaustion on a train trip in North Carolina where he was attempting to restore his health. His pension record indicates that Ethel Racey, a minor (whose appointed guardian was Uzal McCarter, a prominent Republican), received a pension in 1893, certificate 459,592. Section 152, lot 19309.

RADER, LOUIS B. (1837-1881). Corporal, 7th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company C. A German native, Rader joined the 7th Regiment in 1861, enlisting as a corporal on April 19 and mustering out with his company on June 3. He returned to the same company as a private for 30 days in 1863. He belonged to the Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R., joining on February 14, 1881, and dying of diabetes less than a month later, being the first member of his post to die. His last residence was 304 West 58th Street, New York City. Section 117, lot 1641.

RAFF, WILLIAM (1831-1869). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company A; 5th New York Infantry, Company I. Originally from Scotland, Raff enlisted at Brooklyn as a private on August 27, 1862, and mustered into the 14th Brooklyn the next day. On June 2, 1864, he transferred into the 5th New York from which he was discharged on an unknown date. His last address was 194 Smith Street in Brooklyn. His death was attributed congestion of the brain. Section 59, lot 1459, grave 51.

RAGUE, JOHN (1846-1870). Private, 165th New York Infantry, Company E. He was born in New York City where he enlisted as a private on March 24, 1865. On that date, he mustered into Company E of the 165th New York and mustered out on September 1, 1865, at Charleston, South Carolina. He last lived at 209 Delancey Street in Manhattan. His death was caused by peritonitis. In 1885, his wife applied for a widow’s pension that was granted, certificate 426,407. Section 117, lot 10975, grave 966.

RAISBECK, ALPHONSO (or ALPHONZO) EUGENE (1849-1906). Private, 40th New Jersey Infantry, Companies A and B. Raisbeck, who was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, enlisted on March 21, 1865, as a private, and mustered into Company A of the 40th New Jersey on that date. During his service, he transferred into Company B before mustering out on June 12, 1865, at Alexandria, Virginia. He is listed as a dentist in the 1885-1886 Brooklyn Directory. His last address was 320 Sumner Avenue in Brooklyn where he succumbed to pneumonia. His wife, Priscilla J. Raisbeck, received a widow’s pension, certificate 922,683, after applying in 1920. Section 63, lot 15012, grave 12.

RALPH, HENRY CLAY (1841-1876). Private, 131st New York Infantry, Company H. Originally from England, he enlisted as a private at New York City on August 27, 1862, mustered into the 131st New York on September 6, and mustered out on July 26, 1865, at Savannah, Georgia. He died from burns at the Brooklyn Theater fire on December 5, 1876, a conflagration in which 150 people lost their lives. He last resided at 172 Bergen Street in Brooklyn. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 581.

RAMEE, JULES L. (1822-1861). Sergeant major, 36th New York Infantry, Company F. He enlisted as a private on July 29, 1861, at Washington, D.C., and mustered in the same day. Promoted to sergeant major on November 4, 1861, and transferred to the Field and Staff on that date, he died of inflammation of the bowels at Washington, D.C., on November 5, 1861, and was interred at Green-Wood four days later. Section 99, lot 13165.

RAMSEY, ALBERT CLARKE (1813-1869). Colonel, 57th New York Infantry, Companies I and K. Born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, he attended Dickinson College, was admitted to the bar in York County in 1834, served as a district attorney and was editor of York’s Democratic Press. He was made colonel of infantry on March 3, 1847, served in the Mexican War as colonel of the 11th Infantry, United States Army, beginning April 9, 1847, and mustered out on August 14, 1848. Fluent in Spanish, he remained in the area after that war, wrote a perspective of the conflict from the Mexican viewpoint, The Other Side: Or Notes for the History of the War Between Mexico and the United States, and tried his hand at some real estate and business ventures but was not successful. One, called the “Ramsay Mail Route,” attempted to carry mail and passengers from New Orleans to San Francisco by ship with an adjoining stagecoach route running from Vera Cruz to Acapulco, Mexico.

When the Civil War broke out, Ramsey left Texas and had a role in organizing the United States Voltigeurs in Duchess County, New York. Companies K and I of which he was colonel, were consolidated into the 57th New York in late 1861. The 57th mustered in 1861 and mustered out in 1864. He apparently did not serve with the 57th. Family lore notes that his wife and child remained in Texas in 1861 and were loyal to the Confederacy. He last resided, alone, in New York City where he died of Bright’s disease. Section 86, lot 15565, grave 32.

RAMSEY, JAMES (1826-1894). Private, 25th New York Infantry, Company C. A native of Ireland, he enlisted at New York City on May 11, 1861, and mustered into the 25th on June 13. He was wounded at Malvern Hill, Virginia, on July 1, 1862, and mustered out on July 10, 1863, at New York City. Ramsay last resided on Taylor Street in Brooklyn. His death was caused by hemiplegia, paralysis of half the body. Section 187, lot 19976, grave 3.

RANDALL, HENRY RICE (1827-1895). Captain, 14th New York Heavy Artillery, Company B; first lieutenant, 78th New York Infantry, Company H. Randall studied medicine and graduated from Brockport Collegiate Institute. He also worked as a druggist, was an inventor, and manufactured drugs and chemicals. After enlisting as a private at Rochester, New York, on January 10, 1862, he mustered in the next day. Rising through the ranks, he was promoted to second lieutenant on April 12, 1862, to first lieutenant on October 24, 1862, and discharged for disability on April 20, 1863. He re-enlisted in the 14th as a captain on August 29, 1863, at Rochester, New York, was commissioned in the next week on September 4, and was discharged for disability on August 12, 1864. His discharge was revoked and he was restored to command on September 10, 1864, but he did not return to service.

The Brooklyn Directory for 1873-1876 indicates that Randall was a sugar refiner who lived at 473 Kent Avenue; the Brooklyn Directory for 1880-1882 lists him as a chemist living at 426 Lewis Avenue. Randall was active in the G.A.R.’s Lafayette Post #140; as per his obituary in the New York Herald, members of the Lafayette Post were invited to attend his funeral. His last residence was at 426 Lewis Avenue in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to a cerebral hemorrhage. Section 199, lot 29000.

RANDALL, NELSON W. (1843-1892). Private, 35th New York Infantry, Company C. Randall, a New York native, enlisted as a private at Watertown, New York, where he resided, and mustered into Company C of the 35th New York on October 2. Nelson, his father, John Randall, and his younger brother, Artemas (Artemus) Randall, all fought in the Civil War in the same regiment and company and were listed as soldiers from Jefferson County, New York; that county sent 5,000 men to fight for the Union cause. The three are also mentioned by Dave Shampine in his book, New York’s North Country and the Civil War. In the third chapter, “A Civil War Father and Son Killed by the Same Shell,” it is reported that the three men all fought at the Battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, on December 13, 1862, and that Nelson is the only one of the three who survived. Randall mustered out on February 24, 1863, at Falmouth, Virginia.

Jefferson County records report that Randall re-enlisted on August 31, 1864, and returned to Company C; that re-enlistment is not validated by his pension index card. Although he applied for an invalid pension in 1874, application 192,476, there is no evidence that it was certified. As per the 1891 Jersey City Directory, Randall lived on the corner of Newark and Willow Avenues and worked at a planing mill at 176 Ogden Avenue in Jersey City. His last residence was in Jersey City where he died from a fractured skull. Section 192, lot 27532.

RANDOLPH, MAHLON (1832-1888). Captain, 1st Missouri Engineers, Companies A and F. Randolph enlisted as a captain at St. Louis, Missouri, on December 30, 1861, and was immediately commissioned into Company A of the 1st Missouri Engineers. He was transferred to Company F, then was dismissed on December 19, 1863. His soldier record reports that he lived at 245 Broadway in New York City after the War. The New York City Directory for 1884-1885 lists him as employed in “patents” at 132 Nassau Street; the 1885-1886 Brooklyn Directory also lists him in “patents” at 9 Chambers Street. He last lived at 61 West 97th Street in Manhattan. Randolph died from apoplexy. Originally interred in Lot 8840, his remains were moved on January 31, 1896, to Section 206, lot 27367, grave 48.

RANG, ANTON (or ANTOINE) (1831-1882). Principal musician, 39th New York Infantry, Companies I and H; corporal, 18th New York Cavalry, Company C. Of German birth, he enlisted as a private at New York City on May 17, 1861, and mustered into Company I of the 39th New York on May 28. During his service, he was promoted to sergeant, reduced to ranks, promoted to chief bugler on January 30, 1862, and to principal musician on June 24, 1863. He was transferred to Company H at some point during his service. He mustered out at New York City on June 24, 1864. After Rang re-enlisted at New York City as a private on December 29, 1864, he mustered immediately into the 18th New York Cavalry, was promoted to corporal on March 4, 1866, and mustered out on May 31, 1866, at Victoria, Texas. After the War, he lived in Brooklyn. Rang succumbed to phthisis. In 1891, his widow applied for and received a pension, certificate 364,611. Section 2, lot 5499, grave 637.

RANKIN, EDWIN (1846-1929). Musician, 158th New York Infantry, Company G. After enlisting as a musician at Brooklyn on July 30, 1862, Rankin mustered into the 158th New York from which he mustered out on June 30, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia. His application for an invalid pension in 1892 was approved, certificate 1,147,062. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, members of Rankin Post #10 of the G.A.R. were invited to attend his funeral. He last lived at 80A Chauncey Street in Brooklyn. Section 15, lot 17263, grave 2058.

RANKIN, JAMES (1815-1868). Sergeant, 95th New York Infantry, Company A. Rankin enlisted at New York City as a corporal on October 16, 1861, mustered into the 95th the next day, was promoted to sergeant on November 1, 1863, and mustered out on an unspecified date. He re-enlisted on January 26, 1864, and mustered out at Washington, D.C., on June 16, 1865. He died from a cerebral hemorrhage. Section 177, lot 13563.

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RANKIN, JAMES D. (1838-1916). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company H. He enlisted at Brooklyn on April 18, 1861, mustered in on May 23, and was discharged for disability on January 7, 1863, at Washington, D.C. The G.A.R. Post #10 is named in honor of his brother, William Rankin, who enlisted with him and served in the same company. As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, he was a Freemason; his comrades were invited to attend his funeral. He last lived at 563 7th Street in Brooklyn. Rankin died of consumption. Section 156, lot 21552.

RANKIN, JOHN (1845-1921). Private, 37th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company A. Serving for three months in 1862, he enlisted at New York City on May 29, mustered in that day, and mustered out at New York City on September 2. His death was attributed to cancer. Section 177, lot 13563.

RANSFORD, JOSIAH (1839-1900). Unknown soldier history. Ransford was born in South Carolina. As per his obituary in The New York Times, he fought for the Union during the Civil War and was an aide on General Ulysses S. Grant’s staff during the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia; the obituary notes that he was wounded during that battle. Ransford was appointed Deputy Shipping Master in New York, a position that he held for twenty-four years. The 1880 census lists him as Deputy Shipping Commissioner; the Treasury Department listed him as a U.S. Shipping Special Commissioner and runner earning $950 a year. He died from apoplexy at his home at 390 Dean Street in Brooklyn. Section 205, lot 30412.

RANSOM, EDWARD MINTURN (1840-1916). Private, 13th Massachusetts Infantry, Company D; Quartermaster’s and Subsistence Departments. Born in Brooklyn, he was a machinist who resided in Wakefield, Massachusetts, when he enlisted as a private on May 24, 1861. He mustered into the 13th Massachusetts on July 16 of that year. He was discharged on December 2, 1861, at Williamsport, Maryland. Afterwards, he served in the Quartermaster’s and Subsistence Departments, in Washington, D.C., and in Alexandria, Virginia, and at the front until 1865. After the War, he resided in Wakefield, Massachusetts, and was a member of the Horace M. Warren G.A.R. Post #12. He applied for an invalid pension in 1897, certificate number 1,101,516. His last residence was in Newton, Massachusetts. The cause of his death was “acute pulmonary oedema.” Section 33, lot 1292.

RANSOM, WILLIAM (1830-1875). Second lieutenant, 82nd New York Infantry, Company E. Ransom, who was born in New York State, enlisted at New York City as a second lieutenant on April 7, 1861, was commissioned into the 82nd New York on May 21, and was discharged on July 30, 1861, at New York City. His last residence was 67 East 15th Street in Manhattan. Section 158, lot 15146.

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RANSOM, WILLIAM (1827-1905). Private, 3rd Massachusetts Light Artillery; 5th Massachusetts Light Artillery. A seaman and a New York City resident, he enlisted on September 17, 1862, and immediately mustered into the 3rd Massachusetts Light Artillery. He re-enlisted on December 29, 1863, and on September 1, 1864, he transferred to the 5th Massachusetts Light Artillery. On June 12, 1865, he mustered out at Camp Meigs, in Readville, Massachusetts. Ransom was a member of the G.A.R.’s Dahlgren Post #2 in South Boston. He last lived at 625 Fifth Avenue, Brooklyn where he died of apoplexy. Section 86, lot 31217, grave 183.

RANSOM, WILLIAM MAXWELL (1837-1912). First lieutenant and adjutant, 95th New York Infantry, Companies D and K. Born in Johnstown, New York, Ransom was a 5′ 7″ tall machinist with a light complexion, blue eyes and light hair. He enlisted at New York City on January 9, 1862, and mustered into Company D of the 95th New York as a first sergeant. He was promoted to second lieutenant on December 10, 1862, and transferred to Company K. Ransom was subsequently promoted to first lieutenant and adjutant on January 15, 1863, mustered in with this rank on February 27, 1863, and was discharged at Upton Hill, Virginia, on July 16, 1865. His application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 852,890. He lived in Brooklyn until 1902 when he moved to New Jersey, where he last lived in Ridgewood. He died of acute dilation of the heart and chronic myocarditis. Section 113, lot 4681.

RAPER, JOHN (1839-1886). Sergeant, 8th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company A. A New York City native, he enlisted there as a sergeant on May 29, 1862, mustered into the 8th Regiment on that date, and mustered out three months later on September 10 at New York City. His last residence was 576 Pacific Street in Brooklyn. Raper succumbed to paralysis. In 1890, Sarah Raper, who is interred with him, applied for and was granted a widow’s pension, certificate 806,697. Section 99, lot 11166.

RATHBURN (or RATHBONE), ROBERT H. (or V.) (1840-1882). Private, 74th New York Infantry, Company I; 40th New York Infantry, Company G. A New Jersey native, he enlisted as a private at Dansville, New York, on September 27, 1861, and mustered into the 74th New York on October 6. He re-enlisted on December 29, 1863, and was transferred into the 40th New York on July 27, 1864, from which he mustered out on June 27, 1865, at Washington, D.C. His last address was 23 2nd Place in Brooklyn. His death was caused by pneumonia. Section 175, lot 24211.

RAWOLLE (or RAEVOLLE), WILLIAM CHARLES (1840-1895). Lieutenant colonel and major by brevet; captain and aide-de-camp, 34th New York Light Artillery. Prussian by birth, he immigrated to the United States at a young age. During the Civil War, Rawolle enlisted on October 1, 1861, at Flushing, New York, and was commissioned as a second lieutenant in Battery L of the 2nd New York Heavy Artillery (later called the 34th Independent Light Artillery) on October 26. He was promoted to first lieutenant on March 4, 1862, and discharged for promotion to captain on June 21, 1862. In this rank, he served as aide-de-camp to General S. D. Sturgis of the Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, in Maryland. Sturgis expressed his gratitude to Rawolle in the following field reports. Sturgis wrote from South Mountain, Maryland, on September 14, 1862:

“…Discovering a battery of the enemy some 1,500 yards to our right, and so posted as to expose our line to a flank fire, I directed my aide-de-camp, Captain Rawolle, to open upon it with Captain Durell’s battery. The enemy’s battery was silenced in a few moments, and withdrawn from the field. These batteries, under the able direction of Captain Rawolle, rendered material aid afterward, and from the same point, to the troops of General Hooker while hotly pressed on the hills to the right of the Hagerstown road….”

Writing from Antietam, Maryland, on September 22, 1862, Sturgis noted that Captain Rawolle “…was invaluable at all times, carrying orders, placing the artillery in favorable positions, bringing up ammunition, and making himself useful in every department. I would commend this officer to special consideration, as I look upon him as one of the most promising young officers in the service.” On December 24, 1862, he wrote from Fredericksburg, Virginia, and commended his aide-de-camp for his “zeal and energy.” Sturgis wrote from Maryville, Tennessee, on February 4, 1864, and described the difficult conditions endured by the troops over the past two months when they were “…compelled to live mainly on parched corn, most of which has been gathered at a distance of from 6 to 15 miles. The weather at times has been intensely cold and the suffering very great, most of them being without shelter of any kind; yet they have fought well and been successful in almost every instance, and have borne their hardships with the fortitude of true soldiers, sustained by a sense of justice of their cause…” In particular, he was impressed by his aide-de-camp’s “intelligence, courage, and energy on this last as well as all previous occasions…”

Rawolle was brevetted major of volunteers on March 13, 1865, “for gallant and meritorious service” in the Army of the Potomac from August 1862 to January 1863, including the Battles of Antietam and South Mountain in Maryland, and the Battles of Second Bull Run, Warrenton, Sulphur Springs, and Fredericksburg in Virginia. On that same date, he was brevetted lieutenant colonel of volunteers for service in the West, including the cavalry campaign in East Tennessee and the expedition in northern Mississippi, and for gallant daring and good conduct in the Battle of Brices Cross Roads, Mississippi.

After resigning on August 11, 1865, he returned to the service on June 6, 1868, mustered in as second lieutenant in the Second United States Cavalry, was promoted to first lieutenant on April 26, 1869, and regimental quartermaster from July 15, 1870 through September 15, 1874. In 1876, he commanded the rear guard of Company E of the 2nd Cavalry at the Battle of Powder River on March 14 where he was wounded in action. Later that year and commanding Company B, he arrived at the Battle of Little Big Horn too late to save General Custer but was engaged in the ensuing skirmish to successfully capture those involved in Custer’s death. Rawolle was promoted to regimental adjutant as of March 31, 1878, and captain on December 20, 1880. He died suddenly of heart failure while on a sick leave visit to his Brooklyn home at 263 Hicks Street. Section 52, lot 8144.

RAY, RICHARD CORNELIUS (1840-1863). First lieutenant, 88th New York Infantry; private, 22nd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company A. A native of New York City, Ray enlisted there on May 28, 1862, and mustered into the 22nd Regiment that day. After serving for three months, he mustered out at New York City on September 5. He re-enlisted the next month on October 17 as a first lieutenant, and was commissioned into the 88th New York on October 30 but not assigned to any company. He was discharged on January 21, 1863. His last residence was in Brooklyn. His death was from congestive fever. If it was in connection with his service, that information is not recorded. Section 67, lot 17.

RAYMOND, CHARLES HENRY (1834-1916). First lieutenant, 177th New York Infantry. Born in Albany, New York, he was educated at the Albany Academy, and traveled abroad before entering the State Insurance Department where he served as deputy superintendent for four years. During the Civil War, he enlisted as a first lieutenant at Albany on October 11, 1862, was commissioned into the 177th New York on October 25, and mustered out on September 30, 1863.

Returning to business, Raymond was a founder and president of the Widows’ and Orphans’ Life Insurance Company which merged with Mutual Life in 1871. His name became well-known when Mutual Life was investigated in 1905. Active in the insurance industry, he was the first president of the Life Insurance Underwriters’ Association of America. A sportsman, he owned a number of horses, and was collector of sports-related literature. Raymond was a member of the Union League, the Westminster Kennel Club, and the Military Order of the Loyal Legion. He died after falling and breaking his leg. He last lived at 46 McCullough Avenue in Morristown, New Jersey. Section 70, lot 11676.

RAYMOND, EDWARD A. (1833-1873). Captain, United States Volunteers Aide-de-Camp. Born in New York, Raymond enlisted as a captain on October 30, 1861, and was commissioned the same day as captain and additional aide-de-camp into the United States Volunteers. He resigned on October 8, 1862. He last resided at 396 Fifth Avenue in Manhattan but died from consumption in New Haven, Connecticut. Section 150, lot 11841.

RAYMOND, GEORGE WASHINGTON (1846-1920). Drummer, 48th New York Infantry, Company C. A Brooklynite by birth, Raymond enlisted at the age of fourteen for three years of service on July 24, 1861, and joined Company C of the 48th New York as a drummer boy. He served in many of the major actions of the Civil War and re-enlisted in the same regiment and company before the expiration of his term of duty. The 48th was under the command of Brigadier General William T. Sherman in South Carolina and took part in the expedition to Port Royal and was at the capture of Hilton Head. He was present at the siege of Fort Pulaski, Georgia, and the capture of Morris Island, South Carolina. Raymond engaged in a major night action against Fort Wagner, South Carolina, on July 18, 1863. He also fought at the following actions in Virginia: Fort Darling, Drewry’s Bluff, Bermuda Hundred, Cold Harbor and the siege of Petersburg. He was present at the Mine Explosion at Petersburg, Virginia, at Deep Bottom, Strawberry Plains, Foster’s Plantation, and Newmarket Heights, all in Virginia, and at Fort Fisher, North Carolina. His unit returned to Brigadier General Sherman’s command and served with him at Wilmington and Raleigh, North Carolina. He mustered out on September 1, 1865.

Raymond continued to serve in the 23rd Regiment, New York State National Guard (1867-1869); the 9th Regiment, New York State National Guard (1870-1873); and the 7th Regiment, New York National Guard (1874-1881). As per his obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which confirms his Civil War service, he was for 23 years the district superintendent of the Street Cleaning Service in Manhattan, retiring in 1912. Raymond was also a member of several street cleaning organizations. Active in veterans’ groups, he joined the 48th Veterans Association and was a charter member of the Ulysses S. Grant Post #327 of the Grand Army of the Republic. When President Grant lay in state at City Hall in New York City, Raymond stood in the relief guard from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. His last residence was 537 East 26th Street in Brooklyn.  He died from a cerebral hemorrhage in 1920. Section 202, lot 34228, grave 1.

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men
Photos of George Washington Raymond and the Band of the 48th New York Infantry, 1863.

RAYMOND, HENRY JARVIS (1820-1869). Journalist. Born in Lima, New York, Raymond attended the University of Vermont, then came to New York City to pursue a career as a journalist. He submitted poetry to Horace Greeley at the New-Yorker while he was still in college and first worked for him in an unpaid position. When Greeley started the New York Tribune in 1841, Raymond was his assistant editor. A Whig and a Republican, he was elected to the New York State Assembly in 1850 and 1851, was the Speaker in 1851, and lieutenant governor in 1854. After a personal dispute with Greeley, he founded The New York Times with George Jones in 1851. At that time, Raymond promised a newspaper that presented the news in an objective fashion in contrast to the sensational manner of most other dailies.

He was also a managing editor of Harper’s Magazine. Raymond led The Times for eighteen years, setting a standard for journalism. In the 1850s, he editorialized that slavery must end and then championed the right of reporters to protect their sources. On June 13, 1863, he wrote that each editor must have “complete freedom to express, without dictation from Government or from any class or profession, even his own…views on public affairs of those for whom to a certain extent he speaks….”

During the Civil War, Raymond used his position at The New York Times to promote his pro-Union views as an editor and war correspondent reporting from Bull Run, Virginia. The paper was the only one to issue the complete text of the Gettysburg Address on November 20, 1863. The Times consistently supported President Lincoln, and came to enthusiastically support the Emancipation Proclamation. During the New York City Draft Riots of 1863, he and others in the Times Building used Gatling guns from an upper window to repel rioters. Raymond wrote a biography of President Lincoln in 1864 and expanded it in 1865. He was active in politics, serving as chairman of the Republican National Committee during the Lincoln Administration; he also returned to the State Assembly and was its speaker in 1862, served one term in the House of Representatives, being elected in 1864, and then returned to the newspaper. His death was caused by apoplexy. Section 92, lot 1842.

RAYMOND, JAMES P. (1826-1909). Captain, 90th New York Infantry, Company H, 131st New York Infantry, Company F; private, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company F. After enlisting as a private at New York City on April 17, 1861, he mustered into the 7th Regiment the next week on April 26 and served for 30 days. He re-enlisted as a first lieutenant on October 30, 1861, at New York City, and was commissioned that day into the Field and Staff of the 90th New York. During his military duty with the 90th, he was promoted to first lieutenant and adjutant on December 20, 1861, to captain on August 16, 1862, and transferred to Company H on October 11, 1862. He served in South Carolina and Florida under Generals Brannan, Hunter, and Mitchell before he was discharged on April 13, 1863. He subsequently served in the 131st New York as a captain and fought in Louisiana and in the Shenandoah Valley. Raymond was singled out by Colonel Edward L. Molineux, his commanding officer, in his field report from Harrisonburg, Virginia, on September 26, 1864, describing the Shenandoah Campaign. Raymond’s “conspicuous gallantry” occurred when the Union Army “…opened a heavy and well-sustained fire upon the advancing lines of the enemy, … and caused the enemy’s retreat to become a hasty flight. This advanced position was held by us until every cartridge was exhausted…” He mustered out on July 26, 1865. His last residence was on Degraw Street in Brooklyn. Raymond died of heart disease in 1909. Section 96, lot 1559.

RAYMOND, ROBERT RAIKES (1817-1888). Abolitionist. Born in Brooklyn and the father of Rossiter Raymond (see), he graduated from Union College in 1837, studied law in Cincinnati under Salmon P. Chase (who later served in the Lincoln cabinet and then became Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court), and then entered the ministry for ten years after completing studies at Madison University in New York. He was a Baptist minister at Hartford, Connecticut, and then at Syracuse, New York. When the Fugitive Slave Act was passed in 1850, Raymond packed up his family and moved to Syracuse where he was active in the Underground Railroad. He assisted escaped slaves in getting out of New York and into Canada, and when the Fugitive Slave Law was overturned, helped them return to New York. On July 5, 1852, he read the Declaration of Independence before introducing Frederick Douglass at the Corinthian Hall in Rochester, N.Y., where Douglass gave his “Vision for America,” an abolitionist manifesto. Raymond used the pulpit to speak out against slavery and the Fugitive Slave Act. In 1856, he wrote a song for John C. Fremont’s campaign, to the tune of the French anthem, Le Marseilles, “Free press, free speech, free soil, free men, Fremont and victory.”

Raymond left the ministry for teaching and was principal of Syracuse High School until 1856 when he became the chairperson of English literature at the Brooklyn Collegiate and Polytechnic Institute. In 1876, he became the non-resident professor of Shakespeare in the School of Oratory at Boston University which he later reorganized in 1879 as the independent Boston School of Oratory. He nurtured and led the institution until it was disbanded when his health failed in 1884 and he returned to Brooklyn. Raymond achieved renown through his interpretative readings of Shakespeare and wrote Melody of Speech, a privately published manual that was a guide to oratory and oral expression. He last lived in Brooklyn. Section 77, lot 150.

RAYMOND, ROSSITER WORTHINGTON (1840-1918). Captain and aide-de-camp, United States Volunteers. Born in Ohio, he was educated in Syracuse, New York, where his parents were active in the Underground Railroad, and his father, Robert R. Raymond (see) led a Baptist ministry. He graduated first in his class from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in 1858, then studied at the Royal Mining Academy in Freiberg, Saxony.

During the Civil War, Raymond enlisted as a captain on March 31, 1862, and was commissioned and promoted on that day to captain and additional aide-de-camp of United States Volunteers. Raymond resigned his commission on April 6, 1864. His pension record indicates that he first enlisted on September 25, 1861, but the details of his service prior to March 31, 1862, are unknown. He was a cousin of Joseph Howard (see) and John Howard (see), who like Raymond was an aide-de-camp to General George C. Fremont in the Department of the West. Raymond’s uncle, John Tasker Howard, was a close associate of Fremont. During Fremont’s campaign in Virginia, Raymond was commended for gallant and meritorious conduct.

In 1868,Raymond became United States Commissioner of Mines and Mining Statistics in and West of the Rocky Mountains, soon becoming a national expert on mining. In 1870-1872, he was a professor of ore deposits at Lafayette College, during which time in 1871, he visited what is now Yellowstone National Park. An original member of the American Association of Mining Engineers, he was its vice president that year, was president from 1872-1875, vice president from 1876-1877, then editor of its publications from 1884-1911. In 1885, Raymond was the New York State Commissioner of Electrical Subways. An expert on mining law, he was admitted to the bar in 1898, became a lecturer of mining law at Columbia University in 1903, and was the first person to be awarded a Doctorate of Laws from Lehigh University in 1908. An article in the Syracuse, New York, Herald for May 29, 1908, stated that as part of the Memorial Day tribute a historical tablet bearing the names of Civil War veterans from Syracuse High School who received honors would be added to the school’s art treasures. Raymond’s name was included on the plaque along with his association to Fremont. In 1911, he was awarded the highest honors from Japan’s government for his long-standing contributions to its mining industry. In 1915, he applied for and received a pension, certificate 1,176,744.

A supporter of Brooklyn’s Plymouth Church, Raymond was director of its Sunday school for 50 years. He was also asked to retire from engineering and editorial work to take up the pastoral duties of the church after Henry Ward Beecher’s (see) death in 1887 but declined saying that he had God-given gifts that guided him down an appointed path that he (Raymond) would follow his life’s journey to the end of that road. His last residence was 123 Henry Street in Brooklyn. At a memorial at Lehigh University, he was described as “one of the best cases of versatility that our country has ever seen-sailor, soldier, engineer, lawyer, editor, novelist, story-teller, poet, biblical critic, theologian, teacher, chess-player- he was superior in each capacity. What he did, he always did well.” In 1945, the American Association of Mining Engineers named an award in his memory to honor the best paper each year by an author under the age of thirty-three. Section 77, lot 1195.

RAYMOND, WILLIAM LEWIS (1836-1913). First lieutenant, 5th Veteran Infantry, Companies C, D, and B. Raymond, a native of New York City, enlisted there on March 24, 1864, as a private. He mustered into Company C of the 5th Veterans that same day. On December 5, 1864, Raymond was promoted to second lieutenant and transferred to Company D. On August 1, 1865, he rose to first lieutenant effective upon his simultaneous transfer into Company B where he served until he mustered out on August 21, 1865, at Hart’s Island, New York Harbor. His last residence was 307 Webster Avenue in New Rochelle, New York. Section 156, lot 20155, grave 5.

RAYNOR, WILLIAM (1828-1888). Captain, 12th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company I. After enlisting as a captain, Raynor served in the 12th Regiment for three months in 1861. He last lived at 112 Wilson Street in Brooklyn. His death was caused by Bright’s disease, kidney related. Esther Raynor, his widow, who is interred with him, received a pension in 1892, certificate 365,454. Section 170, lot 14177.

REA, JOSEPH B. (1847-1890). Private, 127th New York Infantry. He enlisted and mustered into the 127th New York but was not assigned a company on February 24, 1865, and mustered out at Hart’s Island, New York, on May 8, 1865. At the time of his death caused by pneumonia, he resided at 595 Pacific Street, Brooklyn. Section 117, lot 10975, grave 23.

READ, CHARLES H. (1828-1872). Sergeant, 10th New York Infantry, Companies C and F. Born in England, he enlisted as a private at New York City on March 18, 1864, and mustered immediately into the 10th New York. He was promoted to corporal two months later on May 3, effective upon his transfer to Company F, and rose to sergeant on September 12 of that year. He mustered out on June 30, 1865, at Munson’s Hill, Virginia. His death was caused by phthisis. His widow, Mary Read, whose named was spelled “Reed” on the official document, received a pension, certificate 235,520. Section D, lot 20165.

READ, HENRY NASH (1847-1917). Private, 18th Virginia Infantry, Company K, Confederate States of America. Read was born in Prince Edward County, Virginia. He was 5′ 7″ with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion. After he enlisted as a private on April 24, 1861, at Charlotte County, Virginia, he mustered immediately into Company K of the 18th Virginia, a Confederate regiment. Taken as a prisoner of war on April 6, 1865, at Sailor’s Creek, Virginia, he was paroled on June 30, 1865, at Point Lookout, Maryland, and discharged on an unknown date.

Read received an undergraduate degree from Hampton-Sydney College in Virginia and got his medical degree from Long Island Medical College after the Civil War. He became a specialist in children’s diseases and rose to be the chair of the Pediatrics Department at Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn. He also was associated with the Sheltering Arms Nursery in Brooklyn and was a member of the Medical Society of Kings County, the Long Island Medical Association, the Physicians’ Mutual Aid Association, the Crescent Athletic Club, and the Hamilton Club. He was a brother of William (see) and a relative of Isaac Read (see). At the time of his death from pneumonia, he resided at 228 Clinton Street, Brooklyn, New York. Section 167, lot 26134.

READ, IV, ISAAC (1833-1906). Major, Nitre and Mining Bureau, War Department, Confederate States of America. Born in Prince Edward County, Virginia, Read served in the Confederate Army’s Nitre and Mining Bureau under Isaac Murray St. John (see). The Nitre Corps was responsible for ensuring the Confederacy’s supply of gunpowder and metals. The Confederate Register of Appointments shows him as enlisting from Missouri on April 18, 1862, and resigning on July 28 of that year to begin service as subordinate with pay and rank of first lieutenant of artillery. On July 31, 1862, St. John assigned him to duty west of the Mississippi River with responsibility for Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas. In his letter on that day, St. John wrote, “…Completing your San Antonio assignments you will next examine the Arkansas lead works and if deemed advisable you will start mining on Government account. You will give inordinate attention when the wants of this war permit to the reworking of the rich saltpeter caves in Upper Arkansas.” On August 7, 1862, St. John appointed him captain of artillery. On January 24, 1863, at Little Rock, Arkansas, he signed a requisition “for negroes working in lead mines in service of Capt. Isaac Read, Confederate States Nitre and Mining Bureau, for seven pairs of pants, four cotton shirts, and five boots or shoes.” Appointed major on May 29, 1863, he was again listed as major of the Nitre and Mining Corps on June 15, 1864.

After relocating to New York at the end of the Civil War, he became president of the Read Phosphate Company. According to his obituary in The New York Times, he was a member of the Confederate Veterans’ Association and belonged to the Marine and Field Club. He was a relative of William Read (see) and Henry Read (see). He last lived at 110 Hicks Street in Brooklyn. He died of senility. Section 167, lot 26133.

read

READ, ROBERT (1827-1875). Private, 31st New York Infantry, Company B. Of Irish origin, Read enlisted as a private on May 2, 1861, mustered into the 31st New York on May 27, and mustered out on June 4, 1863, at New York City. His last address was on East 31st Street in Manhattan; his death was attributed to drowning. Section B, lot 8575, grave 150.

READ, WILLIAM WATKINS (1844-1910). Second lieutenant, Confederate Provisional Navy. Read was either born in North Carolina according to some biographies or in Charlotte County, Virginia, according to the 1860 census. He served in the United States Navy as a midshipman beginning on September 27, 1858. As a resident of North Carolina, he enlisted into the Navy of the Confederate States of America on June 11, 1861, as an acting midshipman, and was commissioned immediately. (One source, however, stated that his date of appointment was on April 28, 1861.) Read was listed on the rolls at the Gosport Navy Yard in 1862 (renamed the Norfolk Navy Yard after it was recaptured by Union forces). On October 3, 1862, he passed midshipman.

During the Civil War, Read served on these ships/engagements: CSS United States (1861), James River Batteries (1862), CSS Patrick Henry (1862), CSS Harriet Lane in Galveston Bay, Texas (February 1863), CSS Missouri (Red River Defenses, 1863), CSS Nansemond (commanding, 1863-65), and CSS Richmond (commanding 1863-65). Read was promoted to master on January 7, 1864, and was commissioned into the C.S.A. Provisional Navy as a second lieutenant on June 2, 1864. He also served in the Semmes Naval Brigade, attached as a captain commanding Company F, 2nd Regiment, 1865. Captured at the end of the Civil War, he surrendered and was paroled on April 28, 1865, at Greensboro, North Carolina. According to his obituary in The New York Times, “Read was an officer on the Merrimac (sic) when the Confederate ram fought the Monitor,” but that information is not validated by Confederate service records.

Read graduated from Hampden-Sidney College and studied law with Judge Lomax in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He belonged to the Confederate Veteran Camp of New York. He was a brother of Henry Nash Read (see) and relative of Isaac Read (see). His obituary in the New York Herald confirmed that he was a lieutenant in the Confederate Navy. Read last lived at 97th Street and Fort Hamilton Avenue in Brooklyn. He died of rheumatism in 1910. Section 167, lot 26134, grave 1.

CSS Virginia, aka Merrimack

READY, CHARLES (1841-1915). Private, 83rd New York Infantry, Company E. After he enlisted at New York City as a private on May 27, 1861, he immediately mustered into the 83rd, and was discharged for disability at Baltimore, Maryland, on December 15 of that year. He last lived at 1536 49th Street in Brooklyn. Ready died of cancer. Section 2, lot 5499, grave 178.

READY (or READE), MORRIS (1838-1870). Private, 1st New York Infantry, Company D. Of Irish origin, Ready enlisted at New York City as a private on February 7, 1862, mustered into the 1st New York the same day, and mustered out on May 25, 1863, at New York City. He last lived on West 31st Street in Manhattan. Section 127, lot 17931, grave 414.

RECTOR, PIERSON (1839-1891). Assistant surgeon, 127th New York Infantry; 115th New York Infantry; United States Volunteers. Born in Duanesburg, New Jersey, Rector enlisted as an assistant surgeon on July 9, 1863, at Beaufort, South Carolina, was commissioned into the 127th New York’s Field and Staff two weeks later, and transferred into the 115th New York on December 14, 1863. On February 17, 1864, he transferred back into the 127th New York Infantry. He left the 127th on December 14, 1864, and was promoted to assistant surgeon, with the rank of first lieutenant, in the United States Volunteers. He mustered out on June 4, 1865. His last residence was on Grand Street in Jersey City. His death was attributed to pyaemia, a type of blood poisoning. Section 175, lot 13305.

REDDEN, ALONZO (1844-1864). Private, 62nd New York Infantry, Companies H and E. He enlisted as a private on June 15, 1861, at New York City, mustered into the 62nd New York Infantry on June 30, and was transferred into Company E on August 31, 1861. He was discharged for disability on June 29, 1864. His last residence was on Eagle Street in Brooklyn. Redden died of a gunshot wound on December 12, 1864. Section 121, lot 12991.

redding

REDDING, JOHN W. (1834-1892). Captain, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company A. He enlisted at Brooklyn as a corporal on April 18, 1861, and mustered in on May 23. In that year, he was promoted to sergeant on June 18, to second lieutenant on July 1, to first lieutenant on August 4, and rose to captain on January 7, 1863. Redding was hit by shell fragments that fractured his left arm on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, Virginia. He mustered out on June 6, 1864, at New York City. In 1889, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 466,777. At the time of his death from asthenia, he resided at 168 Herkimer Street in Brooklyn. In 1892, his widow, Kate Redding, who is interred with him, received a pension, certificate 365,110. Section 95, lot 675.

REDFERN, THOMAS (1831-1926). Private, 7th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, Company G. Originally from England and a weaver by trade, Redfern was 5′ 5″ tall with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion. After enlisting as a private at Albany, New York, on April 30, 1863, he mustered into the 7th New York Heavy Artillery that same day, and was discharged for disability at Fort Reno in Washington, D.C., on June 3, 1863. He last lived at 354 Arlington Avenue in Jersey City, New Jersey. He died of an embolism. Section 137, lot 28966, grave 2.

REDFORD, JOHN J. (1826-1881). Ordinary seaman, United States Navy. Born in Ireland, Redford enlisted as an ordinary seaman in the United States Navy on August 14, 1861, served on board the USS Hetzel, and mustered out on August 26, 1864. His last address was in Rye, New York. Section 113, lot 16682.

REDMOND, WILLIAM (1840-1899). First sergeant, 11th New York Infantry, Company H. Redmond, who was born in Ireland, enlisted as a private at New York City on April 20, 1861, and mustered into the 11th New York on May 7. The unit was comprised mainly of volunteer firefighters, and was known familiarly as Ellsworth’s Fire Zouaves. The regiment became famous after they extinguished a fire at the famous Willard Hotel when they were first stationed in Washington, D.C., and then fought in Virginia at the Battle of First Bull Run. Redmond was promoted to first sergeant on September 1, 1861, was at Hampton Roads, Virginia, the site of the Battle of the Monitor v. Merrimack, and mustered out on June 2, 1862, at New York City.

After the Civil War, Redmond founded a trucking company. He was a member of the New York Volunteer Fire Department and the Noah L. Farnham Post #458 of the G.A.R. In 1892, his application for an invalid pension was granted, 859,847. His last address was 208 33rd Street in Brooklyn. Redmond’s death was caused by pneumonia. His wife applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 974,852. Section 135, lot 27263, grave 1935.

REED, CHARLES P. (or G.) (1822-1875). Private, 95th New York Infantry, Company G. A native New Yorker, he enlisted there as a 40-year-old private on February 27, 1862, mustered into the 95th that same day, and was discharged for disability on February 20, 1863. His last address was 602 West 49th Street, New York City. His death was attributed to “cares of vertebra.” Section 15, lot 17263, grave 253.

REED, CHARLES W. (1841-1872). Sergeant, 48th New York Infantry, Company G; private, 13th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company C. A native of Pennsylvania, Reed first served for three months in the 13th Regiment in 1861. He enlisted as a sergeant at Fort Wyman, New York, on August 21, 1861, mustered into the 48th New York that day, was simultaneously relieved as a sergeant and demoted to full private on February 2, 1863, and mustered out on September 16, 1864, at Petersburg, Virginia. As per his tombstone inscription, he was a reverend in civilian life. He last lived in Aiken, South Carolina. He died of phthisis. In 1890, his wife applied for and was awarded a widow’s pension, certificate 366,769. Section 14, lot 10935.

REED, GEORGE STEPHEN (1848-1924). Drummer, 158th New York Infantry, Company C. Reed was born in Brooklyn circa 1848 (sources list years from 1846-1849) and lived there at the time of the New York State census of 1855. While still a young teenager, Reed enlisted as a drummer at Brooklyn on July 29, 1862, and mustered into Company C of the 158th New York. He is listed as having deserted on June 8, 1865, at Richmond, Virginia; however, this may be an error—if it were the case, he would not have been given a pension. According to his pension index card, which notes the desertion date, he also served with the Governor’s Troops Pennsylvania Cavalry but no details of that service are known.

In 1895, Reed applied for and received an invalid pension, certificate 1,192,483. In 1913, he was living in Staten Island at an almshouse. As per his admission paper, dated November 27, he was listed as a 65 year-old leather cutter who was in good health; he noted that he had previously received relief from Kings County Hospital. Reed indicated that the cause of his dependence was “out of work.” He last lived in Brooklyn at 1103 East 94th Street. His death, at Kings County Hospital, was attributed to heart disease. Section 87, lot 1896, grave 242.

REED, LEVI W. (1841-1874). First lieutenant, 51st New York Infantry, Companies C, B, and I. Born in New York State, Reed enlisted as a sergeant on September 23, 1861, at New York City, and mustered into Company B of the 51st on October 18. After he was reduced in rank to private at some point, he was promoted to sergeant on March 1, 1863. He re-enlisted on December 1, 1863. On January 9, 1865, Reed was promoted to sergeant major and two months later on March 4, he was promoted to second lieutenant and transferred intra-regimentally to Company I. He then rose to first lieutenant upon his transfer to Company C on May 13 of that year. He mustered out of service at Alexandria, Virginia, a month later on June 25. His last residence was 387 Gold Street, Brooklyn. His death was attributed to general debility. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 2056.

REED, MICHAEL A. (1818-1897). Private, 8th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company E. A native of New York State, Reed enlisted as a private at Brooklyn and served with the 8th Regiment from April 20 through August 2, 1861. He was discharged at Brooklyn at the expiration of his enlistment. The 1890 Veterans Schedule confirms his service. His last residence was 340 Willis Avenue in the Bronx. Section 48, lot 10431, grave 4.

REED (or READ), SAMUEL E. (1826-1870). Private, 91st New York Infantry, Company H. Reed, who was born in New York State, enlisted as a private at New York City on November 12, 1864, and mustered into the 91st New York on that date. On March 31, 1865, he was severely wounded in action at Gravelly Run, Virginia, necessitating the amputation of his left arm. He was discharged for wounds on July 4, 1865. He last lived at the Soldiers Retreat in New York City and he died of pneumonia. Section 114, lot 8999, grave 76.

REEG, ADAM (1828-1890). Private, 11th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company K. Of German origin, Reeg enlisted at Brooklyn as a private in 1863, mustered into the 11th Regiment for its 30-day activation, and mustered out at the expiration of his enlistment. His last residence was 515 West 43rd Street in Manhattan. His death was caused by nephritis. Section 200, lot 27005.

REES, JOHN W. (?-?). Unknown soldier history. A government-issued gravestone was ordered for him as a Civil War veteran in 1902. However, his soldier history and his place of interment at Green-Wood are unknown. Section ?, lot ?.

REES, LOUIS (1841-1869). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company F; rank unknown, United States Navy. Born in New York State, Rees enlisted at Brooklyn as a private on September 8, 1862, and mustered into the 14th Brooklyn a day later. He transferred out of the Army on April 19, 1864, and started service in the Navy. Further details about his career in the Navy are not specified. He died at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan where his demise was listed as a casualty. Section 115, lot 8999, grave 991.

REIBER, WILLIAM MARVIN (1843-1936). Private, 139th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company K; 9th Veteran Reserve Corps, Company A. After enlisting on September 1, 1862, he mustered into the 139th Pennsylvania that day. He was wounded in the ankle at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 2, 1863, and sent to Jarvis Hospital at Baltimore, Maryland. Furloughed on July 21, he signed into a hospital in Pittsburgh a month later for further treatment. He returned to active duty and suffered a gunshot wound through the thigh at the Battle of the Wilderness, Virginia, on May 5, 1864. He was sent to Paterson Park Hospital in Baltimore, and on August 5 went on furlough to Pittsburgh for treatment. He was transferred to the 9th Veteran Reserve Corps on January 10, 1865, and discharged on June 24, 1865.

In 1867, Reiber’s application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 89,892. He was an active member of the G.A.R. throughout his long life, dying of a heart attack at the 44th Street Hotel just after making a speech at the G.A.R. Allied Organizations’ Lincoln Day Dinner. His last residence was 570 West 172nd Street in Manhattan. Section 156, lot 21047.

REICHLING, PETER (1846-1923). Landsman, United States Navy. Originally from Blauvelt, New York, he was a clerk at the onset of the Civil War. After enlisting as a landsman in the United States Navy on December 24, 1863, Reichling served until his discharge on February 3, 1865. According to his obituary in The New York Times, he also served in the United States Navy during the Spanish-American War. A teacher of foreign languages in private schools in New York City, he was a member of the Gouverneur K. Warren Post #286 of the Grand Army of the Republic. He last resided at 304 Greene Avenue in Brooklyn. Reichling died of cardiac disease. Section 189, lot 16797, grave 2.

reid

REID, DUNCAN M. (1827-1864). Second lieutenant, 162nd New York Infantry, Companies G and I. Reid enlisted as a private at New York City on September 3, 1862, and a week later, mustered into Company G of the 162nd Infantry, where he was made a sergeant the next month on October 18. The 162nd was assigned to Washington, D.C., and then served with the Department of the Gulf in Louisiana. On August 29, 1863, Reid was promoted to second lieutenant effective upon his transfer to Company I that day. Reid was discharged for disability on February 17, 1864, and died less than two months later of chronic diarrhea, probably contracted during his military service. At the time of his death, Reid was living in Manalapan, New Jersey. His widow applied for and received a federal pension in 1871, certificate 187,292. Section 182, lot 9349.

REID (or REA), JOHN W. (1844-1918). Private, 13th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company C; 7th Connecticut Infantry, Company D. During 1862, he enlisted at Brooklyn on May 28, mustered into the 13th New York that day, and mustered out after serving for three months on September 12. He re-enlisted (under the name John Rea) on November 6, 1864, mustered into the 7th Connecticut Infantry on that day, and mustered out on July 20, 1865, at Goldsboro, North Carolina.

In civilian life, he headed the auction firm of J. W. and J. H. Reid. Remaining active in military affairs, he was the vice commander of the Ulysses S. Grant Post #327 of the G.A.R. He successfully applied for an invalid pension in 1907. He last lived at 407 Park Place in Brooklyn. Shortly after his death from myocarditis, Agnes J. Reid, applied for and received a widow’s pension in 1918, certificate 857,167. Section 95, lot 686.

REID, ROBERT (1842-1920). Second lieutenant, 173rd New York Infantry, Company I. Of Scottish birth, he enlisted as a private on September 6, 1862, at Brooklyn, and mustered into the 173rd on November 10 of that year. He rose through the ranks becoming a sergeant on December 20, 1862, first sergeant on April 6, 1865, and second lieutenant on October 17, 1865 (not mustered). He mustered out on October 18, 1865. He applied for and received an invalid pension. At the time of his death due to asphyxia, his residence was 256 Decatur Street, Brooklyn. His widow, Julia A. Reid, also received a pension. Section 205, lot 33933.

REID, SAMUEL (1841-?). Corporal, 165th New York Infantry, Company C; private, 32nd New York Infantry, Company G. Of Irish birth, he first served in the 32nd New York, then enlisted at New York City as a private and mustered into the 165th New York on February 18, 1864. He was promoted to corporal on April 15, 1865, and mustered out at Charleston, South Carolina, on September 1, 1865. Section ?, lot ?.

REID, THOMAS M. (1828-1869). Lieutenant colonel, 182nd New York Infantry; captain, 82nd New York Infantry, Company B. Of Irish birth, he enlisted at New York City as a captain on April 17, 1861, was commissioned into the 82nd New York Infantry on May 21, and was discharged on September 6, 1861. After re-enlisting on September 18, 1862, at New York City, he was commissioned into the Field and Staff of the 182nd New York as lieutenant colonel two months later on November 17. Reid commanded the 182nd in these battles: Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia, from May 8-21, 1864; Totopotomoy, Virginia, from May 27-31, 1864; and Cold Spring Harbor, Virginia, from May 31-June 12, 1864. He was dismissed on June 16, 1864. He last resided at 236 East 50th Street in Manhattan. His death was attributed to cancer. Section 161, lot 13116.

REIF, ARNOLD (1836-1928). First sergeant, 38th New York Infantry, Company C; 4th Light Artillery, United States Army. Born in Germany, he enlisted at New York City as a sergeant on May 7, 1861, mustered into Company C of the 38th New York on June 3, and was promoted to first sergeant on September 9, 1861. After Reif was transferred out on April 28, 1862, he joined the United States Army’s 4th Light Artillery. Although the soldier history indicates that he deserted on an unspecified date, this may be inaccurate since he received an invalid pension in 1887, certificate 723,859. A widower, he last lived at 339 46th Street in Brooklyn but died of cardiac disease at 1181 Bushwick Avenue in Brooklyn at a property owned by his wife Augusta, who is interred with him. Section 205, lot 30553.

REIFF, FRANCIS X. (1838-1877). Second lieutenant, 55th New York Infantry, Company H; 38th Infantry, Company H. Of French origin, Reiff enlisted as a second lieutenant on November 17, 1862, the same date that he received his commission into the 55th New York. On or about December 23, 1862, he transferred into the 38th New York. His last residence was 98 Sackett Street in Brooklyn. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 338.

REIGLE, JOHN B. (1847-1879). Private, 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company B. It is likely that this John Reigle, a New Yorker by birth, enlisted on March 6, 1865, mustered into the 51st Pennsylvania on that date, and mustered out at Alexandria, Virginia, on July 27 of the same year. He may also have served in the 21st New York Infantry. He last lived at 222 8th Street in Brooklyn. His death was caused by pulmonary consumption. His widow, Abby C. Reigle, applied for a pension, application 117,789, but no certificate number is known. Section 115, lot 13536 (Soldiers’ Lot), grave 127.

REILLY, ALEXANDER M. (1833-1861). Sergeant, 1st New York Cavalry, Company M. Born in Ireland, Reilly enlisted at New York City as a sergeant on August 28, 1861, and mustered on that day into Company M of the 1st New York Cavalry. He was shot to death by a comrade on December 24, 1861, at Camp William, Virginia. On January 1, 1862, he was interred in Lot 9895, grave 331, a public lot for adults. First removed to lot 16855 in July 1866, his remains were removed to the present location on July 4, 1873. Section 6, lot 21018, grave 331.

REIMER, GEORGE (1829-1869). Corporal, 73rd New York Infantry, Companies E and H. Reimer, who was born in New York City, enlisted as a private on August 9, 1861, at Camp Decker, New York, and mustered into Company E of the 73rd New York five days later. He was promoted to the rank of corporal effective upon his transfer to Company H on September 1 of that year. He was reduced in rank to private on December 15, 1862, and mustered out on August 20, 1864, at Petersburg, Virginia. He last lived in New York City where he died from phthisis. Section B, lot 8575, grave 73.

REINECKE, JOHN H. (1835-1890). Private, 5th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. He enlisted as a private on May 16, 1861, mustered into the 5th Regiment, also known as the Jefferson Guard, and mustered out on August 7 of that year at New York City. His last address was on Horton Street in Brooklyn; his death was attributed to a hemorrhage. Section 153, lot 20234.

REINHARD (or REINHARDT), ADAM (1824-1904). Private, 174th New York Infantry, Companies C and K; 162nd New York Infantry, Company K. Born in Germany, Reinhard enlisted as a private on October 11, 1862, at New York City, mustered into Company C of the 174th on October 18, and was transferred into Company K on November 1. On February 17, 1864, he was transferred into the 162nd New York, and was discharged for disability on an unknown date at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He last resided on 26th Street in Brooklyn. His death was caused by apoplexy. Section B, lot 9895.

REINHARDT, JOHN (1828 or 1830-1868 or 1888). Private, 119th New York Infantry, Company G. A native of Germany, Reinhardt enlisted at New York City on August 18, 1862, mustered into the 119th New York on September 5, and deserted at some point. His last residence was in New York City. There are two John Reinhardts interred at Green-Wood who seem to match this soldier history; it is impossible to determine which one is the soldier. Section A, lot 8100, grave 628, or Section 127, lot 14679, grave 64.

REISERT, FREDERICK (1826-1872). Rank unknown, 10th United States Infantry, Company C. Originally from Germany, Reisert served in the 10th United States Infantry but the dates of his enlistment and discharge are unknown. He last lived in Fosters Meadow (now Valley Stream), Long Island. He died of consumption. Section 116, lot 4073, grave 84.

REMINGTON, JAMES H. (1839-1899). Major by brevet; captain, 7th Rhode Island Infantry, Company H; United States Veteran Reserve Corps. Remington’s ancestors purchased their family homestead in Warwick, Rhode Island, from the Narragansett Indians. James Remington’s father, Benjamin Remington, left his seat in the State legislature to crush the Dorr Rebellion (1841-1842), an uprising that sought to extend the vote to non-landowners, and was a prominent Whig who later was one of the founders of the Republican Party.

James Remington graduated from Brown, at the top of his class, in 1862, but gave up his law studies to join the Union cause. After enlisting as a private at Warwick, Rhode Island, on April 9, 1862, he mustered into Company H of the 7th Rhode Island on September 4. He was promoted to captain at some point before being injured at the Battle of Fredericksburg on December 13, 1862, then returned home on furlough. While home, he was elected to the State legislature and took his seat for a brief time. He was discharged from military service for disability on May 2, 1863. Once his health was restored, he gave up his legislative seat. He was commissioned as a full captain in the Veteran Reserve Corps on June 27, 1863, and assigned to Albany, New York, where he was appointed judge advocate. He continued to study law at Elmira, New York, and presided at courts-martial in Rochester, New York, where he distinguished himself. He was brevetted to major on March 13, 1865.

During Reconstruction, Remington was the military commissioner in Winchester, Wytheville, and Norfolk, Virginia. He was admitted to the bar at Norfolk in 1868, and, after Virginia re-entered the Union, was elected commonwealth’s attorney for Norfolk County and the city of Portsmouth. Remaining active in military affairs, he was commander of the David Farragut Post #120 of the G.A.R. in Portsmouth and in December 1870, was appointed commander of the Department of Virginia. In 1870, his application for an invalid pension was granted, certificate 107,083.

Remington moved to New York in 1872 where he was a partner in law firms that bore his name. The president of the United States Law Association as of 1881, he was responsible for law digests that specialized in business and commercial law. In addition, he was one of the first members of the New York Bar Association, belonged to the Montauk, Riding and Driving Club, and the Brooklyn Institute of the Arts. He also was renowned as a book collector and writer who contributed to many magazines and journals. He last lived at 838 Carroll Street in Brooklyn. An article about his death, a suicide by pistol shot to the head, appeared in The New York Times on February 10, 1899. Apparently, he was ill with the “grippe,” but suffered from bouts of depression. The article also noted that he lived in a “handsome brownstone in a fashionable neighborhood,” and left considerable property. Section 139, lot 26526.

RENOUARD, AUGUSTE (or EUGENE AUGUSTE) (1839-1912). Surgeon, Louisiana Militia, Confederate States of America. Born at Point Coupee in St. Mary’s Parish, Louisiana, Eugene Auguste Renouard was educated by tutors as a young boy. His father, also named Auguste, was a wealthy plantation owner. Young Auguste went to St. Louis at age 12 where he attended Catholic schools and graduated from St. Xavier’s College with a degree in chemistry and pharmacy. After finishing medical school at McDowell University in St. Louis in the 1850s, he taught there, and was a medical doctor before the Civil War.

As per his obituary in the  Brooklyn Citizen, Renouard enlisted as a private at Point Coupee at the start of the Civil War in an artillery battery prior to being placed on the medical staff of General J. E. B. Stuart as assistant surgeon. According to a descendant, he served in the Louisiana militia (Confederate Army) as a surgical steward, assistant surgeon, and then medical officer with the rank of major, during the Vicksburg Campaign in 1863. That same family history, which acknowledges that there are no known records of Renouard’s service, notes that he apparently escaped capture during the Island #10 battle on the Mississippi River. Island #10 was at the base of a tight double turn in the Mississippi River, making it a strong defensive position because Union ships invading the South by river would have to slow down near it. The descendant reports that when the defensive gun batteries were surrendered at Island #10 on April 8, 1862, 4,500 troops were captured and that Renouard and others escaped by swimming across the Mississippi. During his escape, Renouard had only his basic uniform clothing and a knife.

As per a 1912 newspaper article, Renouard said that after the Confederate defeat at Vicksburg, his war service ended when he was placed on parole under the proviso that he not re-enter the military service. His obituary in the Brooklyn Citizen states that he was taken as a prisoner of war at Vicksburg. During the Vicksburg Campaign, the family believes that Renouard was a medical officer on the staff of Confederate General John C. Pemberton. His obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, which notes his Civil War service, confirms that he was a surgeon on the staff of General J. E. B. Stuart in the Confederate Army.

It was during the Civil War that he conceived and developed a pioneering method for embalming, including the creation of specialized instruments that bore the family name. The embalming fluids that he developed were eventually sold throughout the United States and overseas. His grandson, who has extensively researched his family’s history, notes that Renouard, seeing no future in Louisiana after the Civil War, moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was a pharmacist with the local Leitch Pharmacy and practiced medicine. When the pharmacy was sold, he left for Memphis, Tennessee, and in 1866, relocated to Chicago. On July 4, 1867, he married Ottilia Ecke; the couple had ten children, only six of whom survived to adulthood. After the Great Chicago Fire in October 1871, the Renouards and their baby son moved to Denver, Colorado, (where he dropped Eugene from his name and in 1878, wrote The Undertakers Manual). In Denver, he operated a drug store, ran a casket-making business, perfected his embalming techniques, and was commissioned to send embalmed bodies of settlers back to their families in the East. An article by his son, Dr. C. A. Renouard, about the embalming school in Denver appeared in Colorado Magazine (1950, pp. 215-218). Apparently, embalmers from all over the United States were so impressed with the appearance of the bodies of the settlers that they communicated with Auguste Renouard, came to Denver and were taken on as assistants to be instructed in his techniques at his school which opened in 1874. In 1878, he wrote and published The Undertaker’s Manual, a 230-page document that continued to be used for almost 80 years. Today, the Historical Museum of Denver recognizes Renouard as a pioneer in that city.

According to a descendant, Renouard helped many Chinese in Denver during anti-immigrant riots in 1880. (These Chinese had come to Colorado to help in the building of railroads.) Renouard piled many of the Chinese who were being attacked into his horse-drawn hearse, drew the curtains over the windows, and helped them escape. In 1882, he moved to Rochester, New York, where he belonged to a Masonic lodge, which was unusual for a Catholic, relocated to Kansas City, Missouri, for three years, then went back to Denver to live in 1887.

He settled in Brooklyn in 1888 where he and his family opened the Renouard Training School for Embalmers in downtown Manhattan at 991 Second Avenue, a respected facility that closed in 1950. Students from Europe, Canada, and South and Central America came to learn its techniques. His obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle states that he had made fourteen trips to Europe and taught embalming all over the world; he was the first to lecture on the art of embalming in London and Paris. According to his descendant, Auguste Renouard was cited as the “mentor of embalming” in the 1945 edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica and authored numerous articles for professional publications up until his death. He last lived at 292 6th Avenue in Brooklyn where he died from cirrhosis and arteriosclerosis. His funeral took place at the Church of St. Francis Xavier, where he was a member. He was survived by his widow, four sons and two daughters; one son was an undertaker.

A monument to him, celebrating his pioneering work in embalming, was erected at Green-Wood in October 1914, by the Funeral Directors of America, Canada, and England. The ad requesting funds for a “suitable monument” is pictured below. The memorial, which cost $1,250, was inscribed in part, “Auguste Renouard, America’s first instructor in the Art of Embalming.” The embalming fluids, which he developed, were used by the United States government during World Wars I and II. Section 131, lot 33908, grave 2.

RENSHAW, JAMES H. (1839-1886). Private, 47th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company D. Originally from England, Renshaw enlisted as a private at Brooklyn on June 17, 1863, and mustered into the 47th Regiment’s National Guard where he served for 30 days. He noted in his personal sketch for the G.A.R. that his regiment was activated by the national government when General Lee’s Army invaded Pennsylvania. His term expired on July 23 when his company mustered out at Brooklyn. In 1884, he joined the Henry M. Lee Post #21 of the G.A.R. Renshaw died from phthisis. Section 145, lot 25543.

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RENTALL (or RANTEL), JOSEPH (enlisted as CARR, JOSEPH) (1837-1888). Private, 20th Connecticut Infantry, Company H; 5th Connecticut Infantry, Company I. Though his gravestone identifies him as Joseph Rentall of the 20th Connecticut, Company H, he served in that regiment under the name Joseph Carr. A resident of Orange, Connecticut, he was drafted into the 20th as a private on August 24, 1863. On June 13, 1865, he transferred into the 5th Connecticut Infantry, Company I, and mustered out on July 19, 1865, at Alexandria, Virginia. His wife applied for and received a widow’s pension after his death, certificate 423,667. His pension index card establishes that Joseph Rentall used the alias of Joseph Carr. Sections A/ B, lot 8100, grave 465.

REOCK, GEORGE (1828-1891). Sergeant, 8th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Companies G and E. A New Jersey native, Reock first served for three months as a private in the 8th Regiment’s State Militia, Company G, in 1861. He re-enlisted as a sergeant on May 29, 1862, mustered immediately into the 8th Regiment’s National Guard, Company E, and mustered out three months later on September 10 at New York City. In 1890, he applied for and received and invalid pension, certificate 883,087. Reock last resided at 100 Lawrence Street in Brooklyn. His widow applied for and received a pension in 1892, certificate 365,935. He was interred at Green-Wood on April 11, 1893. Section 197A, lot 28318, graves 1 and 2.

RESCH, JOHN C. (1845–1907). Drummer, 28th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company H. A native of Germany, Resch served for 30 days in 1863 as a drummer for the 28th Regiment.. He filed for a pension in 1897, certificate 949,169. His last residence was 708 Hancock Street, Brooklyn. His death was caused by nephritis. Section 194, lot 30613, grave 2.

REUSS, CONRAD (1828-1882). Private, 2nd New York Light Artillery; 1st New York Light Artillery, Independent Battery; Veteran Reserve Corps. Of German birth, Reuss enlisted as a private at New York City on August 28, 1862, and mustered that day into the 2nd New York Light Artillery. He was transferred into the 1st New York Light Artillery on June 6, 1863, and then transferred into the Veteran Reserve Corps on January 10, 1865. In 1875, his application for an invalid pension was approved, certificate 191,445. He last lived on Old Ridge Street in New York. He died of angina pectoris. In 1883, Charlotte Reuss applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 222,627. Section 2, lot 5499, grave 1774.

REUTER, LOUIS (1834-1879). Private, 5th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company B. Of German birth, Reuter enlisted as a private at Washington, D.C, on May 16, 1861. On that date, he mustered into Company B of the 5th New York Militia, also known as the Jefferson Guard, and was discharged from military service on August 7, 1861, at New York City. His last residence was 17 Howard Street, New York City. His death was attributed to a carbuncle. Section 190, lot 17463, grave 3.

REVEL, BELTHASER (or BELTHAZER) (1820-1896). Private, 12th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company A. Originally from Bavaria, Germany, he was a barber by trade. In 1861, he served as a private for three months with the 12th Regiment. His last address was 72 Carmine Street in Manhattan. He died from hemiplegia, a stroke. Section 126, lot 7639, grave 459.

REVERE, GEORGE WASHINGTON (1838-1885). Private, 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry, Company H. Born in New York State, Revere was a 5′ 8½” carpenter with a light complexion and dark hair and eyes. He enlisted on August 20, 1862, and a month later, on September 19, took sick with a hemorrhage of the lungs caused by exposure to rain and cold while his regiment was marching and when he had no blanket or tent shelter. He was hospitalized in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and New York City where he was discharged on July 29, 1863.

Apparently, Revere returned to service and was charged with desertion on November 2, 1863, from Ladies Home General Hospital but this allegation was disputed. (His pension application indicates a discharge date of September 1, 1863.) On December 10, 1886, the desertion was cleared from his record. He was granted a pension, certificate 357,579. His last residence was 475 Kent Avenue in Brooklyn. His death was caused by phthisis. In 1887, his widow, Mary C. Revere, applied for a pension, which was approved under certificate 245,203. Section 85, lot 3803, grave 181.

REYNOLDS, CARLETON S. (1840-1923). Private, 13th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company F. Reynolds’s birthplace is not clear. According to the Green-Wood database, he was born in Illinois; the 1910 census cites New York as his birthplace. As per his pension index card, Reynolds enlisted on May 28, 1862, served in Company F of the 13th Regiment, and mustered out with his company after three months on September 12. The 1890 Veterans Schedule confirms his Civil War service. He applied for and received an invalid pension in 1905, certificate 1,118,905.

The 1910 census reports that Reynolds had been married for thirty-three years, was living in Brooklyn at 185 Prospect Place in a house that he owned with no mortgage, and was a survivor of the Union Army. A widower at the time of his death, he last lived at 185 Prospect Place in Brooklyn. The cause of his death was pneumonia. According to his will, he died with $12,000 worth of real estate and $40,000 in personal property-the equivalent of a total estate of about $700,000 today. Section 165, lot 26665, grave 6.

REYNOLDS, JOHN G. (1801-1865). Colonel, United States Marine Corps. Born in New Jersey, he was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Marine Corps on May 26, 1824. During the Battle of Bull Run, Virginia, on July 21, 1861, Reynolds, who had the rank of major, commanded a Marine Battalion on Henry House Hill. Stonewall Jackson’s Brigade routed his recruits, who were inexperienced. He acknowledged their greenness in his battle report three days later from Washington, D.C., and went on to add:

“….The abrupt and hasty retreat from the field of battle presents a deplorable deficiency in both arms and equipments. The rout being of such a general character, the men of all arms commingled, the only alternative left was to hasten to the ground occupied by the brigade to which we were attached on the morning of the day of the battle. On my way thither I had the good fortune to fall in with General Meigs, whose consternation at the disastrous retreat was depicted upon his countenance. He was of the opinion the Army should hasten to Arlington, fearing otherwise the enemy would follow up their successes and cut us off on the road. My men being weary and much exhausted, without blankets and other necessaries, I determined to strengthen such as should pass the wagons by hot coffee, and move on to headquarters at Washington City, where their wants could be supplied. But few came up; others continued on to the Long Bridge, where, on my arrival, I found some seventy or more, who, at my urgent solicitation, were permitted to accompany me to the barracks…”

The following September, Reynolds led an expedition to the coast of South Carolina. The ship experienced a disaster in which seven men were killed and much equipment and supplies were lost. Apparently, he rose to lieutenant colonel at some point but was court-martialed for unspecified reasons. He last lived on Flushing Avenue in Brooklyn where he died of phlebitis on November 2, 1865. Section 75, lot 3310.

REYNOLDS, MARTIN (1843-1890). Private, 141st Pennsylvania Infantry, Company G. Born in New York, Reynolds enlisted as a private on August 14, 1862, mustered into the 141st Pennsylvania, and was discharged on December 11, 1862. He was a member of the G.A.R., joining in 1887. He last lived in Flatbush, Brooklyn. His death was caused by phthisis pulmonalis. Section 6, lot 20118, grave 445.

REYNOLDS, SAMUEL F. (1823-1882). Sergeant major, United States Marine Corps. Born in Maryland, he served continuously in the Marine Corps from 1846-1869, and was a veteran of the Mexican War. When a monument in his honor was decorated at Green-Wood on Memorial Day in 1885, the article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle noted, “…He crossed the equator twenty-three times and visited all parts of the world during his long service. He was one of the ushers at the inauguration of President Lincoln, and assisted in laying the first Atlantic cable. He was one of the last men to leave the United States war ship Constitution at the time she was wrecked, and was complimented for his gallant service on board that historical vessel…” Reynolds was active in the Rankin Post #10 of the G.A.R, which he joined in 1881. His last residence was 34 Clinton Place in Brooklyn. In 1882 he died from uremic poisoning. Section 154, lot 23835.

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REYNOLDS, STEPHEN R. (1838-1864). Captain and assistant adjutant general, United States Volunteers Adjutant General’s Department; first lieutenant, 99th New York Infantry, Company E. After enlisting as a second lieutenant at his hometown, New York City, on December 31, 1861, Reynolds was commissioned into the 99th New York on January 21, 1862, and rose to first lieutenant of his company on October 10 of that year. He was discharged for promotion on July 29, 1863, and was commissioned into the United States Volunteers Adjutant General’s Department as a captain and assistant adjutant general on that day. On June 3, 1864, he was critically wounded at Cold Harbor, Virginia, and succumbed there the following month on July 30. Section 67, lot 5420.

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REYNOLDS, WILLIAM T. (1834-1862). Sergeant, 5th New York Infantry, Company K. Reynolds enlisted as a sergeant at New York City on April 25, 1861, mustered into the 5th New York the next month on May 9, and was reduced to private in December 1861. After being detailed to escort the body of Lieutenant Colonel Joseph A. DeMonteil (see) to New York City on March 12, 1862, he resumed the rank of sergeant on March 16, 1862, and became the color sergeant. However, he soon contracted typhoid fever and died at New Bridge, Virginia, on June 24, 1862. Section 75, lot 3309.

RHEINWALD (or REINWALD, RHINWOLD), WILHELM (or WILLIAM) (1841-1890). Sergeant, 19th Veteran Reserve Infantry, Company H; corporal, 46th New York Infantry, Company A. A native of Germany, Rheinwald enlisted at New York City as a private on July 29, 1861, mustered into Company A of the 46th New York on that date, and was promoted to corporal of his company at some point. On July 30, 1864, he was wounded in action at the Battle of Petersburg, Virginia. He transferred into the 19th Veterans as a sergeant on March 22, 1865, at Elmira, New York (the site of a Confederate prisoner of war camp), where he was discharged on August 8, 1865. According to the 1880 census, he was employed in paints and oils. His last residence was 417 Third Avenue in New York City. He died from phthisis (tuberculosis). Section 2, lot 5499, grave 763.

RHETT, ROLAND SMITH (1830-1898). Major and quartermaster, Confederate States of America; private, Rutledge’s Cavalry. Born in Charleston, South Carolina, Rhett first served as a private in Rutledge’s Cavalry (Charleston Light Dragoons). He enlisted as a major on November 16, 1861, in South Carolina. In a letter dated December 20, 1861, shortly after Rhett’s appointment as major and quartermaster in the Confederate Army, General Lee ordered him to “proceed without delay to Columbia [S.C.] to relieve temporarily Captain Coles in his duties at that place.”

An interesting anecdote about Major Rhett is contained in a letter he wrote to the Chief of Ordnance in Richmond, Virginia, dated June 8, 1863, in which he requested that he be allowed to purchase “one of the Pistols shipped to you this day…” since “I am without a weapon of any kind…” On August 18, 1864, Rhett wrote, “Please inform me upon what basis I shall exchange the greenbacks in possession of the federal prisoners at the post for confederate money.” (There was no response to this inquiry.) A letter written on September 24, 1864, indicated that he was directing transportation between Columbia and Charlotte Junction.

During the Confederate evacuation of Columbia, on the night of February 16, 1865, Rhett’s staff tried and failed to transport vital Confederate ordnance supplies out of the path of Sherman’s advancing army. During the preceding days, the evacuation of stores and other military supplies was bungled. On February 14, private citizens with their personal property loaded onto railroad cars. Rhett, together with Major N. R. Chambliss, visited Major John T. Trezevant, head of the arsenal and ordnance officer, to draw up a priority list to move supplies. The next day, an attempt was made by Rhett to secure wagons and freight cars for government materiel but the action was too late since Trezevant’s stores had already come under enemy fire. On February 15, it was estimated that the arsenal held 150 tons of supplies including 50 boxes of machinery, 500 boxes of stores, 200 pigs of lead, and 70 carloads from the Charleston, South Carolina, arsenal. Eventually, only 105,000 rounds of small ammunition and some cash receipts and official documents were removed. A day later, the arsenal was deserted. This episode of mismanagement was called by General Josiah Gorgas, chief of Confederate ordnance, as perhaps the worst loss of stores and machinery in the War. An investigation was ordered but was unfinished when the hostilities ended. Roland Rhett’s brother was General Thomas Grimke Rhett who was also a major in the Confederate Army as well as Chief of Staff of General Joseph E. Johnston. At the time of Thomas Rhett’s death from anaemia in 1878, Roland Rhett lived in Baltimore, Maryland. Rhett’s last residence was 96 Columbia Heights, in Brooklyn. Section 202, lot 32690, grave 2.

RHINES, ALBERT M. (1845-1869). Corporal, 93rd Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company B; private, 12th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company E.; 95th New York Infantry. A native of New York, he first served as a private for 30 days with the 12th Regiment when it was activated in 1863. A year later, he re-enlisted as a private, and served for 100 days with the 93rd New York National Guard during which time he was promoted to corporal on an unstated date. He re-enlisted as a private at Tompkinsville, New York, on March 24, 1865, and mustered into an unassigned company of the 95th that same date. He mustered out on May 9 of that year at Hart’s Island, New York Harbor. His last residence was in Newark, New Jersey, His death was attributed to apoplexy. Section 19, lot 5947.

RHOADES (or RHODES), CHARLES EDWARD (1842-1909). Artificer, 1st New York Engineers, Company F. A native of New York City, Rhoades was 5′ 7″tall with blue eyes and a fair complexion. After enlisting as a private at New York City on November 29, 1861, he immediately mustered into the 1st New York Engineers. He was promoted to artificer during his service, forfeited half of his pay in 1862, and was confined for a time in 1863 at Morris Island, South Carolina. He mustered out at Varina, Virginia, on November 28, 1864. His regiment served in the Department of the South and then moved to the Army of the James.

In civilian life, he was a mason by trade. According to a descendant, Tyler Rhoades, Charles changed his surname from “Rhodes” to “Rhoades” sometime between 1870 and 1880. His application for an invalid pension was granted in 1899, certificate 992,896. His last address in Manhattan was at 104 West 83rd Street. At the end of his life, he lived at the Virginia branch of the National Veterans’ Home. His death was attributed of “neutral insufficiency.” Emma Rhodes, who is interred with him, applied for and received a widow’s pension, certificate 693,410. Section 129, lot 27373.

RHODES, ROBERT (1839-1904). Sergeant, 5th New York Heavy Artillery, Company H. Born in Rockaway, New York, he enlisted as a private at New York City on August 30, 1862, and mustered into the 5th Heavy Artillery on September 1. Rhodes was promoted to corporal on June 7, 1864, and to sergeant on April 25, 1865, before mustering out on June 22, 1865, at Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. remaining active in military affairs, he belonged to the George C. Strong Post #534 of the G.A.R. as of January 26, 1885. He last lived on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. His death was attributed to apoplexy. Section 29, lot 11440.

RHODES, WILLIAM P. (1822-1882). First sergeant, 1st New York Engineers, Company F. Originally from Halifax, Nova Scotia, he enlisted as a first sergeant on November 11, 1861, at Brooklyn, and mustered into Company F, 1st New York Engineers, the same day. He was reduced to the rank of sergeant on an unknown date and served with the regiment until he mustered out on October 11, 1864, at Deep Bottom Run, Virginia. According to the 1880 census, he was a plumber by trade. He was a member of the G.A.R., Rankin Post #10. His last residence was at 77 Clermont Avenue in Brooklyn. Rhodes succumbed to heart disease. Section 183, lot 20300.

RIBLET, WILLIAM H. (1816-1897). Colonel by brevet; captain, 7th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company D. Riblet, a native of New York City, was an employee of the County Clerk’s office, and organized the Peter Cooper Fire Insurance Company in 1851, where he was its secretary. At age 44, he enlisted at New York City as a captain on April 17, 1861, was commissioned into the 7th Regiment on April 26, and mustered out on June 3 of that year at New York City. He was commissioned into the same regiment and company a year later on May 25, 1862, when it was part of the New York State National Guard, served in Washington, D.C., and mustered out at New York City on September 5, 1862. In 1863, he served with the 7th in Baltimore, Maryland. Home on sick leave in July 1863, he came out of a sick bed to help subdue the Draft Riots in New York City. For this and his other service he was brevetted colonel.

Though admitted to the bar, Riblet never practiced law, and eventually rose to the presidency of the Peter Cooper Fire Insurance Company. For more than 60 years he was associated with the 7th Regiment. He was a member of the Seventh Regiment Veteran Association and the Lafayette Post #140 of the G.A.R. (which he joined on June 3, 1887). He appears to be the father of William V. G. Riblet (see). He died of heart disease at his home, 120 West 75th Street in Manhattan. Section 75, lot 8256, grave 4.

RIBLET, WILLIAM V. G. (1845-1922). Sergeant, 5th Light Artillery, United States Army, Battery I. Born in Troy, New York, Riblet enlisted as a private and mustered into the 5th Light Artillery of the Regular United States Army. During his service, he was promoted to sergeant of his company. He also joined the Navy at some point in his career. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic’s James McQuade Post #557. Since his name appeared on the Sons of Union Veterans, it appears likely that William Riblet (see) was his father. His last residence was 55 West 105th Street in Manhattan. His death was caused by thrombosis. Section 75, lot 8256.

RICARD, WILLIAM LAYTON (1840-1928). Private, 8th Regiment, New York State Militia, Company E. A New York City native, Ricard served as a private with Company E of the 8th Regiment when it was activated for three months in 1861. A year later, the 8th Regiment was part of the New York State National Guard. Ricard re-enlisted on May 29, returned to Company E, and mustered out with his company at New York City on September 10. According to the 1920 census, he was living in Staten Island where he last resided at 2229 Richmond Terrace. Ricard death was attributed to senility. Section 98, lot 14116.