Recommended for ages 8 and up.

In each of these 45-minute activities, students and families will learn about a Green-Wood permanent resident who led a fascinating life and will then do an at-home activity inspired by that person’s legacy.

Curriculum Connections:

New York State Social Studies Framework (Grade 4)

A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Develop questions about New York State and its history, geography, economics, and government.

2. Recognize, use, and analyze different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 6-8)

Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

Identify, effectively select, and analyze different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including primary and secondary sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).

Figures: Resident Legacies

Materials:

Henry Chadwick source packet:

○ Photo of his monument

○ Source 1: Scientific American article about pitching

Profile of Chadwick on Green-Wood’s website

● Paper and pencil

Step 1: Learn about Chadwick

● Start by looking only at Chadwick’s monument. Observe it closely.

○ What do you KNOW about him based on his monument?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you WONDER about him?

○ Why do you think he’s called the “Father of Baseball”?

● Read Chadwick’s biography on Green-Wood’s website and the article that he wrote for Scientific American. Note: the whole article may be hard to read. Read the first paragraph and then check out the images.

○ What do you KNOW about him based on these sources?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you still WONDER about him?

○ Why do you now think he’s called the “Father of Baseball”?

○ Did you make any inferences based on his monument that these other sources confirmed? Or did these sources change your mind?

Step 2: Become the founder of a sport!

● Invent a game that you and your family can play in your home.

● Follow Chadwick’s lead:

○ Invent at least two RULES for your sport. Tips: think of what it takes to win, and at least one thing that is not allowed.

○ Invent special lingo for your game. What words can you make up that apply to your game and what do they mean?

○ Tips for inventing a sport for your home:

 Use items you already have on hand.

 Think about how someone can win or lose the game first. What is the object of the game?

 Consider games that involve moving an item from one place in your home into another, or into a “goal” space. Make sure the item is not special or fragile.

● If you are moving an item around, what parts of your body are or are not allowed to touch it. Hands? Feet? Or are you only allowed to move it with another item, like a stick?

 How will people use their bodies in this game? Make sure you move safely in your home!

 What is the best surface, or field, for your game? Does this game get played mostly on the floor? On a table? On a bed? How do you set up your field for the game?

 Who are the players of your game? Do individuals play against each other, or on teams? How many players can there be?

 How is your game scored? How many points does it take to win? Can a player or team ever lose a point? If so, how? What happens if there is a tie?

 What makes your game challenging? How can you add in obstacles that make it harder for either side to win?

Step 3: Reflect and Share

● What was easy and what was hard about coming up with your own game and special words for it?

● Chadwick didn’t play baseball professionally, but he’s still considered a “father” of the game. What do you think his most important contribution was?

● What other figures besides players are important in a sport you love? How do they make the game interesting, important, or more widespread?

● Share your game with Green-Wood! Share a video or picture with us on Instagram using the hashtag #GreenWoodisMyClassroom.

Materials:

Susan Smith McKinney Steward source packet:

○ Photo of her monument

○ Source 1: Source 1: Brooklyn Daily Eagle article February 7, 1870 about her medical school

○ Source 2: Brooklyn Daily Eagle article April 10, 1893 about an art show in her home

Profile of Steward on Green-Wood’s website

● Paper, pencil, scissors, markers

Step 1: Learn about Steward

● Start by looking only at Steward’s monument. Observe it closely.

○ What do you KNOW about her based on her monument?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you WONDER about her?

● Read Steward’s biography on Green-Wood’s website and the article excerpts about her.

○ What do you KNOW about her based on these sources?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you still WONDER about her?

○ What was it like to be a woman in medical school?

○ Did you make any inferences based on her monument that these other sources confirmed? Or did these sources change your mind?

Step 2: Make a poster for a cause you care about!

● Pick a cause you care about:

○ What is something in your community or school that you want to change?

○ Is there something you think is unfair or unjust?

○ Is there a group in your community already fighting for change that you want to help?

● Make a poster to share your cause with others:

○ Think about what you can do to make change in your community or to help your cause

○ If there is already an organization working for that cause, how can you help them?

○ What do you want people to know about your cause? How can you get others to care about it too?

○ Tips for making your poster:

 Find exciting facts

 Use big letters

 Use pictures as well as words. What images can illustrate your cause?

 Colors! Make it bright and eye-catching!

Step 3: Reflect and Share

● What cause did you choose to make a poster for? Why?

● What causes did Susan McKinney Steward care about? How did she give back to her community?

● How did she get others to care about her causes?

● What were some challenges she faced and how did she get past them? Are there any challenges in
fighting for the cause you care about?

● Share your poster with Green-Wood! Share a picture with us on Instagram using the hashtag #GreenWoodisMyClassroom.

Materials:

Charles Feltman source packet:

○ Photo of his monument

○ Source 1: Feltman’s obituary

○ Source 2: postcard of Feltman’s restaurant

● Profile of Feltman on Coney Island History Project’s website

Profile of Feltman on Coney Island History Project’s website

● Paper and pencil

Step 1: Learn about Feltman

● Start by looking only at Feltman’s monument. Observe it closely.

○ What do you KNOW about him based on his monument?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you WONDER about him?

● Read Feltman’s biography on Coney Island History Project’s website, his obituary, and look at the postcard of his restaurant. Note: if the whole article is too long just read the first paragraph and the headline.

○ What do you KNOW about him based on these sources?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you still WONDER about her?

○ Did you make any inferences based on his monument that these other sources confirmed? Or did these sources change your mind?

Step 2: Cook a food that represents your culture/heritage with you family!

● What are foods that are important to your culture/heritage/family? It could be:

○ a recipe passed down in your family

○ a new food that has ingredients that connect to your culture or heritage

○ a food you cook for special occasions or holidays

○ a food specific to a place in this country or another country where your family is from

○ any food that you think represents you or your culture

● Find a recipe. Maybe someone in your family has a recipe already or you can look one up online

● Cook with your family!

Step 3: Reflect and Share

● Why did you pick the food that you did? How does it connect you to your culture/heritage or family?

● How does eating this food make you feel? Would you miss it if you moved somewhere that did not eat that food?

● Frankfurters were a popular dish in the region of Germany where Feltman grew up. Why do you think he wanted to bring this dish with him to the United States?

● The hot dog was an invention that combined food from Feltman’s German heritage with his American experiences. Can you think of any other foods that combine different cultures?

● Share your food with Green-Wood! Share a video or picture with us on Instagram using the hashtag #GreenWoodisMyClassroom.

Materials:

Anna Ottendorfer source packet:

○ Photo of her monument

○ Source 1: New York Times article about her funeral

○ Source 2: Photo of the New Yorker Staats Zeitung

Profile of Anna Ottendorfer on Green-Wood’s website

● Paper and pencil, scissors, tape/glue

Step 1: Learn about Ottendorfer

● Start by looking only at Ottendorfer’s monument. Observe it closely.

○ What do you KNOW about her based on her monument?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you WONDER about her?

● Read Ottendorfer’s biography above, the article about her funeral, and look at the photograph of the newspaper. Note: the whole article may be hard to read. Read the first beginning and the section about Mr. Schurz address that talks about her work.

○ What do you KNOW about her based on these sources?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you still WONDER about her?

○ Did you make any inferences based on her monument that these other sources confirmed? Or did these sources change your mind?

Start a newspaper covering the news in your household!

Here’s an example

○ Note: it doesn’t have to be long, it can just be one page

● What do you want to call your newspaper?

● What are some stories you want to report on? What is going on in your household? Has anything exciting or unusual happened that you want to report on?

● Some tips for creating a newspaper:

○ Interview a family member

○ Write a story about a pet or stuffed animal

○ Review a book or movie you saw or meal you ate

○ Write about an activity you and your family have done

○ Research a topic that interests you and write about it

● Come up with catchy headlines for your stories

● Draw or find pictures to go with the stories

● Put it all together:

○ Write the title of your newspaper and today’s date on the top of a sheet of paper

○ Cut out your all your stories and pictures and glue or tape them together on one piece of paper, or if you have more stories, make multiple pages of your paper

● Write all the stories yourself or have other people in your household contribute to the newspaper too!

Step 3: Reflect and Share

● What was easy and what was hard about making a newspaper? Were there stories that were easier to write than others?

● Anna Ottendorfer ran a German language newspaper called the New Yorker Staats Zeitung. Why do you think having a newspaper in her language was important to her and other German Americans? Have you seen other newspapers in languages other than English?

● Do you think having newspapers in your language are important? What kinds of things do people get from reading newspapers?

● Did you learn anything new writing your own newspaper?

● Share your newspaper with Green-Wood! Share a video or picture with us on Instagram using the hashtag #GreenWoodisMyClassroom

Materials:

FAO Schwarz source packet:

○ Photo of his monument

○ Source 1: Advertisement in The New York Times

● Source 2: 1911 toy catalog

Profile of FAO Schwarz on Green-Wood’s website

● Paper and pencil, scissors, markers, tape/glue

Step 1: Learn about Schwarz

● Start by looking only at Schwarz’s monument. Observe it closely.

○ What do you KNOW about him based on his monument?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you WONDER about him?

● Read Schwarz’s biography above and look at the store catalog and newspaper ad. NOTE: Make sure to look through the first few pages of the catalog for photos of the store

○ What do you KNOW about him based on these sources?

○ What do you guess or infer?

○ What do you still WONDER about him?

○ Why do you now think he’s called the “Father of Baseball”?

○ Did you make any inferences based on his monument that these other sources confirmed? Or did these sources change your mind?

Step 2: Create your own toy!

● Make a toy out of materials you find in your home. Make sure to ask your parents before using
any materials you find.

● Get inspired: look at the toys in FAO Schwarz’s catalog and think about toys you like to play with

● Think about material: what materials do you have lying around the house. Anything could become part of your new toy: toilet paper tubes, toothpicks, egg cartons, fabric, plastic bottle tops. Check your recycling bin!

● Get your materials together and start creating

○ If you don’t know where to start, look at your materials for inspiration. Does the shape remind you of something? Can you see a way that it could be turned into something else?

○ Use scissors, tape, glue, and markers to put your materials to use

○ If you still don’t know what to make, that’s okay! Start constructing and see what happens.

Step 3: Reflect and Share

● What was easy and what was hard about making your own toy?

● FAO Schwarz’s toy store was the biggest in the world in the nineteenth century. Looking at the toys in the catalog, how are they similar or different from the toys you play with?

● Share your toy with Green-Wood! Share a video or picture with us on Instagram using the hashtag #GreenWoodisMyClassroom

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