Below is a sample of local, state, and national standards met by our programs. For a more complete list for a particular program and grade level please email education@green-wood.com.

K-5

Common Core:

Key Ideas and Details

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 2)
A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Develop questions about the community.
2. Recognize different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).
3. Identify and explain creation and/or authorship, purpose, and format of evidence.
6. Create an understanding of the past by using primary and secondary sources.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 3)

A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Develop questions about a world community.
2. Recognize and use different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including primary and secondary sources, such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).
3. Identify and explain creation and/or authorship, purpose, and format of evidence; where appropriate, identify point of view.
6. Create an understanding of the past by using primary and secondary sources.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 4)

A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Develop questions about New York State and its history, geography, economics and government.
2. Recognize, use, and analyze different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 5)

A. Gathering, Interpreting and Using Evidence

1. Develop questions to help identify evidence about topics related to the historical events occurring in the Western Hemisphere that can be answered by gathering, interpreting, and using evidence.
2. Recognize and effectively select different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including primary and secondary sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Early Grades

Chapter 1: CULTURE (p.26), The learners will understand:

  • “Culture” refers to the behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of living together of a group of people.

Chapter 2: TIME CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE (p.30) The learners will understand:

  • The study of the past is the story of communities, nations, and the world.
  • Concepts such as: past, present, future, similarity, difference, and change.
  • That we can learn our personal past and the past of communities, nations, and the world by means of stories, biographies, interviews, and original sources, such as documents, letters, photographs, and artifacts.
  • Key people, events, and places associated with the history of the community, nation, and world.
  • Key symbols and traditions that are carried from the past into the present in the United States and other countries, and that reflect diverse cultures.
  • That people view and interpret historical events differently because of the times in which they live, the experiences they have, and the points of view they hold.

Load More


6-8

Common Core

Key Ideas and Details:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of the source distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary specific to domains related to history/social studies.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.7 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 6)

A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Develop and frame questions about topics related to historical events occurring in the Eastern Hemisphere that
can be answered by gathering, interpreting, and using evidence.
2. Identify, effectively select, and analyze different forms of evidence used to make meaning in social studies (including primary and secondary sources such as art and photographs, artifacts, oral histories, maps, and graphs).

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 7)

A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

1. Define and frame questions about the United States that can be answered by gathering, interpreting, and using evidence.
2. Identify, select, and evaluate evidence about events from diverse sources (including written documents, works of art, photographs, charts and graphs, artifacts, oral traditions, and other primary and secondary sources).
3. Analyze evidence in terms of historical context, content, authorship, point of view, purpose, and format; identify bias; explain the role of bias and audience in presenting arguments or evidence.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grade 8)

A. Gathering, Interpreting and Using Evidence

1. Define and frame questions about the United States and answer them by gathering, interpreting, and using evidence.
2. Identify, describe, and evaluate evidence about events from diverse sources (including written documents, works of art, photographs, charts and graphs, artifacts, oral traditions, and other primary and secondary sources).
3. Analyze evidence in terms of historical and/or social context, content, authorship, point of view, purpose, and format; identify bias; explain the role of bias, context and audience in presenting arguments or evidence.

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Middle Grades

Chapter 1: CULTURE (p.26), The learners will understand:

  • That culture may change in response to changing needs, concerns, social, political, and geographic conditions.

Chapter 2: TIME CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE (p.30) The learners will understand:

  • The study of the past provides a representation of the history of communities, nations, and the world.
  • The learners will understand: Concepts such as: chronology, causality, change, conflict, complexity, multiple perspectives, primary and secondary sources, and cause and effect.
  • That we can learn our personal past and the past of communities, nations, and the world by means of stories, biographies, interviews, and original sources, such as documents, letters, photographs, and artifacts.

Load More


9-12

Common Core

Key Ideas and Details

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, attending to such features as the date and origin of the information.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.

Craft and Structure:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/social science.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.5 Analyze how a text uses structure to emphasize key points or advance an explanation or analysis.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.5 Analyze in detail how a complex primary source is structured, including how key sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text contribute to the whole.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.6 Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.9 Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

New York State Social Studies Framework Practices (Grades 9-12)
A. Gathering, Interpreting, and Using Evidence

2. Identify, describe, and evaluate evidence about events from diverse sources (including written documents, works of art, photographs, charts and graphs, artifacts, oral traditions, and other primary and secondary sources).
3. Analyze evidence in terms of content, authorship, point of view, bias, purpose, format, and audience.
4. Describe, analyze, and evaluate arguments of others.
5. Make inferences and draw conclusions from evidence.
6. Deconstruct and construct plausible and persuasive arguments, using evidence.
7. Create meaningful and persuasive understandings of the past by fusing disparate and relevant evidence from primary and secondary sources and drawing connections to the present.

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: High School Grades

Chapter 1: CULTURE (p.26), The learners will understand:

  • “Culture” refers to socially transmitted behaviors, beliefs, values, traditions, institutions, and ways of living together of a group of people.
  • Concepts such as beliefs, values, mores, institutions, cohesion, diversity, accommodation, adaptation, assimilation, and dissonance.

Chapter 2: TIME CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE (p.30) The learners will understand:

  • Different interpretations of the history of societies, cultures, and humankind.
  • Concepts such as: era, chronology, causality, change, continuity, conflict, historiography, historical method, primary and secondary sources, cause and effect, and multiple perspectives.
  • That knowledge of the past is influenced by the questions investigated, the sources used, and the perspective of the historian.
  • Different interpretations of key historical periods and patterns of change within and across nations, cultures, and time periods.

Load More


Specific Programs

Revolutionary War Programs

New York City Department of Education Social Studies Scope and Sequence
Grade 4, Unit 3: Colonial and Revolutionary Periods
Grade 11, Unit 1: Forming a Union: Colonial and Constitutional Foundations (1607 – ca. 1800)

New York City Department of Education Social Studies Scope and Sequence
D. Geographic Reasoning

1. Use location terms and geographic representations, such as maps, photographs, satellite images, and models, to describe where places are in relation to each other, to describe connections between places, and to evaluate the benefits of particular places for purposeful activities.

Immigration and Innovators and Inventors Programs

New York City Department of Education Social Studies Scope and Sequence

Grade 4, Unit 5: Making the Empire State: Immigration, Industrialization and Westward Movement
Grade 10, Unit 6: Globalization and the Changing Environment
Grade 11, Unit 3: Post-Civil War America Industrialization, Urbanization and the Progressive Movement (1865 – ca. 1900)

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies Early Grades

Chapter 3: PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS (p.34), The learners will understand:

  • Cultural patterns and their interactions within and across places, such as migration and settlement, changes in customs or ideas, and in the ways people make a living.

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies Middle Grades

Chapter 3: PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS (p.34), The learners will understand:

  • Patterns of demographic and political change, and cultural diffusion in the past and present (e.g. changing national boundaries, migration, and settlement, and the diffusion of and changes in customs and ideas).
  • Factors that contribute to cooperation and conflict among peoples of the nation and world, including language, religion, and political beliefs.

National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies High School

Chapter 3: PEOPLE, PLACES, AND ENVIRONMENTS (p.34), The learners will understand:

  • Cultural diffusion of customs ideas.
 

Civil War and Black New Yorkers Programs

Social Studies Scope and Sequence

Grade 4: Unit 4: Freedom and the New Nation: Federal, State and Local Government
Grade 4: Unit 5: Making the Empire State: Immigration, Industrialization and Westward Movement
Grade 11: Unit 3: Post-Civil War America Industrialization, Urbanization and the Progressive Movement (1865 – ca. 1900)

Art and Architecture Program

N.A-V.A-K.4.1 Understanding and Applying Media, Techniques, and Processes
Achievement Standard:

  • Students know the differences between materials, techniques, and processes
  • Students describe how different materials, techniques, and processes cause different responses
  • Students use different media, techniques, and processes to communicate ideas, experiences, and stories
  • Students use art materials and tools in a safe and responsible manner
 

N.A-V.A-K.4.3 Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas
Achievement Standard:

  • Students explore and understand prospective content for works of art
  • Students select and use subject matter, symbols, and ideas to communicate meaning
 

N.A-V.A-K.4.4 Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures
Achievement Standard:

  • Students know that the visual arts have both a history and specific relationships to various cultures
  • Students identify specific works of art as belonging to particular cultures, times, and places
  • Students demonstrate how history, culture, and the visual arts can influence each other in making and studying works of art
 

N.A-V.A-K.4.5 Reflecting Upon and Assessing the Characteristics and Merits of Their Work and the Work of Others
Achievement Standard:

  • Students understand there are various purposes for creating works of visual art
  • Students describe how people’s experiences influence the development of specific artworks
  • Students understand there are different responses to specific artworks
 

N.A-V.A-K.9-12.1 Understanding and Applying Media
Achievement Standard, Advanced:

  • Students communicate ideas regularly at a high level of effectiveness in at least one visual arts medium
  • Students initiate, define, and solve challenging visual arts problems independently using intellectual skills such as analysis, synthesis, and evaluation
 

N.A-V.A-K.9-12.2 Using Knowledge of Structures and Functions
Achievement Standard:

  • Students demonstrate the ability to form and defend judgments about the characteristics and structures to accomplish commercial, personal, communal, or other purposes of art
  • Students evaluate the effectiveness of artworks in terms of organizational structures and functions
  • Students create artworks that use organizational principles and functions to solve specific visual arts problems
 

Achievement Standard, Advanced:

  • Students demonstrate the ability to compare two or more perspectives about the use of organizational principles and functions in artwork and to defend personal evaluations of these perspectives
  • Students create multiple solutions to specific visual arts problems that demonstrate competence in producing effective relationships between structural choices and artistic functions
 

N.A-V.A-K.9-12.3 Choosing and Evaluating a Range of Subject Matter, Symbols, and Ideas
Achievement Standard:

  • Students reflect on how artworks differ visually, spatially, temporally, and functionally, and describe how these are related to history and culture
  • Students apply subjects, symbols, and ideas in their artworks and use the skills gained to solve problems in daily life
 

Achievement Standard, Advanced:

  • Students describe the origins of specific images and ideas and explain why they are of value in their artwork and in the work of others
  • Students evaluate and defend the validity of sources for content and the manner in which subject matter, symbols, and images are used in the students’ works and in significant works by others
 

NA-VA.K-12.4 Understanding the Visual Arts in Relation to History and Cultures
Achievement Standard:

  • Students differentiate among a variety of historical and cultural contexts in terms of characteristics and purposes of works of art
  • Students describe the function and explore the meaning of specific art objects within varied cultures, times, and places
  • Students analyze relationships of works of art to one another in terms of history, aesthetics, and culture, justifying conclusions made in the analysis and using such conclusions to inform their own art making
 

Achievement Standard, Advanced:

  • Students analyze and interpret artworks for relationships among form, context, purposes, and critical models, showing understanding of the work of critics, historians, aestheticians, and artists
  • Students analyze common characteristics of visual arts evident across time and among cultural/ethnic groups to formulate analyses, evaluations, and interpretations of meaning
 

Early Childhood Nature Walk Program

Coming soon.

Load More