INTRODUCTORY NOTE
(click here for the second half of entries, Jennings-Zarick)

World War I, also called the First World War, the Great War, and the War to End All Wars, began in Europe in 1914. But it was not until April 6, 1917—100 years ago– that the United States Congress declared war against Germany. The American Expeditionary Force was organized and sent off to France to join the fight; by the time an armistice was declared, in November of 1918, more than 4.7 million Americans had served, 53,000 of whom were killed in action, 63,000 had died of disease, and 205,000 had been wounded.

A year ago, Green-Wood decided, in anticipation of the 100th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War I, to identify and honor as many as possible of those who had served in that conflict, whether civilian or military, and are interred here. For the last year, our volunteers and staff have searched Green-Wood’s grounds, its records, and various online databases, in order to accomplish this goal. As of this writing, we have identified 161 men and women and written a biography for each. Their dramatic stories cover a wide range: the Cromwell twins, Red Cross nurses who served in France, then committed suicide as they began their journey home; Intelligence Officer Louis Abel, who wrote just before he was killed in battle, “As the war goes on and as I come out of each engagement still alive, I think often of those at home and wonder if I will ever see them again”; Lieutenant Kenneth Culbert, who while flying with the First Aero Squadron, photographed enemy trenches under heavy fire, only to be shot down as his plane returned to its base; Robert Bayard Cutting, associate organizing secretary of the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA), who volunteered to serve in France, only to die there of disease; aeronaut Private Lloyd Ludwig, who was flying over France, went into a spin, and had a wing on his plane fall off as he plummeted to his death; many men killed in the trenches of France in 1918, interred in France, then brought back home to Brooklyn in 1921; and those who served in World War I and went on to live long lives, including Louis Belmer, the last of our surviving veterans, who died in 1980. We remember them and honor their sacrifices.

On November 13, 1917, three members of the American Expeditionary Force became the first United States casualties of World War I, killed near Verdun, France. They were quickly buried near where they had fallen. This was in accord with the orders from General John Pershing, commanding American forces. Pershing had dictated that, with no time to set up logistics and no space on ships going back to America, as well as with a desire to spare survivors from seeing the corpses of their loved ones, no bodies would be sent back to the States. He decreed that all American troops who were killed in France would have their final resting place there.

But then something happened. Congressmen began to hear from their constituents—when would these men, their loved one who had died for their country, be brought home? The popular sentiment was strong: bring the bodies of the fallen home.

The British, who had lost 700,000 men, were opposed to the idea of bringing their fallen home—it would be a monumental task. The French, fearing the spectacle of bodies dug up and transported across their land, and hoping to concentrate on rebuilding, were aghast—and banned the transportation of bodies for three years.

As the debate raged, ex-President Theodore Roosevelt and his wife, Edith, wrote that they wanted their son Quentin, who had died in battle, to remain interred in France:  “To us it is painful and harrowing long after death to move the poor body from which the soul has fled,” he wrote. “We greatly prefer that Quentin shall continue to lie on the spot where he fell in battle and where the foeman buried him.”

But thousands of Americans who had lost their loved ones were of a different mind: they wanted the United States government to return their sons to them for burial at home. A Brooklyn mother wrote: “My son sacrificed his life to America’s call, and now you must as a duty of yours bring my son back to me.”

In October, 1919, the U.S. War Department announced a compromise: next of kin would decide whether their fallen would remain interred in American cemeteries in France or be sent back to them. Late in 1920, France relented and agreed to allow bodies to be removed. It would take the next two years for the Americans, at great cost, to bring remains home. In all, 46,000 bodies of the fallen were brought back from France; 30,000 still remain there.

On July 21, 1921, General John Pershing was on the dock in Hoboken, New Jersey, when the first transport ship, bearing the remains of the men who had served and died under him, arrived. Pershing spoke at a ceremony honoring the first three men who had died while under his command in France—with their caskets in front of him, having returned to their native land. “They gave all,” he said, “and they have left us their example. It remains for us with fitting ceremonies, tenderly with our flowers and our tears, to lay them to rest on the American soil for which they died.” In 1921 and 1922, many of the fallen would be interred at Green-Wood Cemetery.

Great thanks to our volunteers—Susan Rudin, Ed Amato, Lou Saverese, Jim Lambert and all the others, as well as researcher Vincent Katinas, who made these identifications and biographies possible. Volunteers searched through Green-Wood’s chronological books, looking for men who died in France and were brought back to Green-Wood. We have searched Green-Wood’s grounds, looking for monuments dedicated to those who served in World War I. And we have gone through applications to the United States government, filled out by widows and parents and sister and brothers, daughters and sons, for Veterans Affairs markers for their World War I veterans. Many of these veterans died in France; others lived to a ripe old age. In all, we offer biographies of 161 men and women, the last of whom died in 1980, in two sections, alphabetically; there was just too much data to put all of this into one document.

The biographies below are Green-Wood’s tribute to the men and women who served in World War I—as pilots, nurses, infantryman, gunners, pay clerks, intelligence officers, and more, who are interred at Green-Wood or who have cenotaphs here. We honor their service and sacrifice with the stories of their lives. We invite you to browse or search these biographies.

ABEL, LOUIS RAYMOND (1881-1918). Lieutenant and intelligence officer, 112th Infantry, 28th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A Brooklynite by birth and an electrical engineer by trade, Abel applied for a passport in 1905 on which he stated that he would return to the United States in about three years. A resident of Lebanon, Connecticut, he described himself as 5′ 10½” tall with gray eyes, brown hair, Roman nose, broad forehead, light complexion and oval face. He was an electrical engineer in the contracting business living in Brooklyn at the time of the 1910 census; his house on 86th Street was mortgaged. According to his great-grand-daughter, his electric contracting business took him to many cities in the Northeast. His great-grand-daughter states that he was working in Boston for two years prior to his induction into the Army. He enlisted at New York City and was sent abroad in May 1918. As per his Military Service Record for the State of Connecticut, he was married with one child and was affiliated with the Baptist religion. That document indicates that Abel had served with the 13th Regiment, Heavy Artillery National Guard in Brooklyn, was a Freemason and was employed as an electrical engineer. During World War I, he was a first lieutenant and intelligence officer with responsibility for reconnaissance behind German lines. He wrote this letter to his brother on September 14, 1918, thirteen days before his death.

My dear brother Eugene,

As the war goes on and as I come out of each engagement still alive, I think often of those at home and wonder if I will ever see them again.

You all are in my thoughts continually when I have time to think of other things besides the continual shellfire and fighting.

You may readily believe brother of mine that we think of nothing but shells, gas, and bullets and bayonets when we are in action and when a man says differently you can believe he has never been under fire. All one thinks of is where the next shell is going to land.

It gives one a great feeling of comfort to know that there is a competent doctor near at hand and enough stretcher bearers and ambulances to carry one to the rear when hurt. I have been gased once and was ill for a short while but did not go out of action. I also got a scratch from a machine gun bullet but it is all O.K. now. Have been troubled with diarrhea for several weeks but am getting better. That is a common complaint here. So many dead bodies both horses and men and the doctors say the flys (sic) carry the germs to the food we eat. With the coming of cold weather the flys will disappear and we will be rid of this I am sure.

Many of our fine boys have gone never to return. And of my first Scout Platoon of 28 men I had 20 casualties and only 8 men were left after our advance at the Marne and I now have a new Platoon of 40 men and have lost a few of these.

My work takes me in front of the advance and the lines reconnoitering in the Boche lines for enemy positions. It is awe inspiring work especially in the darkness of night. The best times are the darkest nights when it is stormy.

I recently lay several hours with four men in a ditch partially submerged in water and mud while the Boche were all around me. I thought I was a gone goose that night.

My nerves have been sorely tried and many officers and men have lost out completely due to nervous strain making them useless.

I sincerely hope all is well with you and yours. Love to all and may the God who watches over us all bring us together again.

Lovingly your brother

Louis

He was killed in battle in Argonne, France, on September 27, 1918. His mother was notified of his death by telegram on November 3, 1918. His body was returned to the United States and he was interred on September 25, 1921. Section 141, lot 23506, grave N. Front Right Corner.

Louis Abel

Louis Abel

ABRAHAMSEN (or ABRAHAMSON), GEORGE CHRISTIAN (1889-1918). Acting pay clerk, United States Navy. A native of Mandal, Norway, one of his New York Abstracts of World War I Military Service indicates that he was born in Brooklyn. Abrahamsen’s World War I Draft Registration Card dated June 5, 1917, notes that he was single, worked on a boat in New York City and lived on 49th Street in Brooklyn. He described himself as tall, of medium build with blue eyes and light hair (not bald). As per one New York State Abstract of World War I service, in which his name is spelled “Abrahamson,” he enlisted in the United States Navy as a chief yeoman on the USS Ozark on February 9, 1916. From April 6, 1917 through September 30, 1917, he was stationed as a chief yeoman at the receiving ship in New York. He was then assigned to the Navy Recruiting Bureau in New York until July 12, 1918, at which time he was appointed acting pay clerk (temporary). From July 12, to September 11, 1918, he was stationed at the Naval Air Station at Brunswick, Georgia. Abrahamsen then served in Washington, D.C., at Naval Operations under Supply Officer of Northern Bombing, Squadron, France, until November 8, 1918 (another document lists the expiration of that assignment as the date of the armistice, November 11, 1918). He returned to the Naval Air Station in Brunswick, Georgia, where he died on December 13, 1918. He last lived at 747 43rd Street in Brooklyn. At some point during his service, he received a good conduct medal. Helen Abrahamsen, his niece, applied for a government-issued marble headstone with a Christian cross on September 22, 1962. Section 203, lot 35169.

abrahamsen-george-stone

ACHELIS, JOHNFRITZ (1890-1965). First lieutenant, 6th Field Artillery; 7th Field Artillery, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Originally from Seabright, New Jersey, Achelis was a 1913 graduate of Yale University where he had been enrolled in the Reserve Army Training Corps (ROTC). In June 1914, he registered as an American citizen at the United States Consulate in Lyon, France, while on business there as a merchant. As per his New York Guard Service Card, he entered service on November 25, 1914. On June 30, 1916, he mustered into Troop A, Squadron A, a Cavalry unit in the Mexican Punitive Campaign and mustered out with his company as a private first class at New York City on June 19, 1916. As per his muster roll, he was described as a merchant who was 6′ 1½” tall with a fair complexion, hazel eyes and light brown hair. He was discharged on June 25, 1917. Two months later, on August 29, 1917, he entered the U.S. Army as a first lieutenant and went to Plattsburg, New York. Subsequently, he was stationed in Camp Jackson, South Carolina, and Camp McClellan, Alabama. On September 17, 1917, Achelis went overseas with the 6th Field Artillery assigned to the 1st Expeditionary Force. He was later assigned to the 7th Field Artillery.  He returned to the United States on June 30, 1918, got married on November 2, 1918, and was discharged from the Army on December 3, 1918. On September 13, 1924, Achelis and his wife sailed to Europe aboard the Olympic for a three month excursion with stops in England, France and Italy; his passport application noted that this was a pleasure trip. His World War II Draft Registration Card, filed in 1942, shows that he was living on Rumson Road in Monmouth, New Jersey, had a home phone was working for Commercial Factors Corporation located at 2 Park Avenue in New York City. In 1959, he lived at 151 East 79th Street, Manhattan, when he travelled to Hamilton, Bermuda. Section G, lot 32199.

ADAMS, CHARLES RASQUIN (1895-1961). Private first class, 104th Field Signal Battalion, Company C, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A Brooklyn native, Adams enlisted in the United States Army on May 3, 1918, and was assigned to Company C, 104th Field Signal Battalion. While overseas, he was wounded and received a Purple Heart and was also awarded a Victory Medal. Adams was honorably discharged on May 28, 1919. At the age of 47, he registered for the draft during World War II, while residing at 46 Fairlawn Street in Ho-Ho-Kus, New Jersey. At that time, he was self-employed, working at 31 North Broad Street in Ridgewood, New Jersey. His last address was 44 Carlton Avenue in Ho-Ho-Kus. On October 1, 1961, Alma K. Adams, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian cross, citing his World War I service and medals earned. Section 131, lot 33207, grave 1.

AITKEN, VINCENT L. (1899–1918). Sergeant, 55th Infantry, Company A, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Brooklyn, Aitken enlisted at Fort Slocum, New York, on June 10, 1917. On September 8, he was promoted to private first class. Private Aitken shipped out to Europe on August 3, 1918, and was promoted to sergeant on August 21. On November 3, 1918, just eight days shy of the armistice that ended World War I, Sergeant Aitken was killed in action in France. His last residence was 85 Hudson Avenue in Brooklyn. His body was returned to New York and was interred on April 8, 1922. Section 4, lot 35965, grave 2.

ANDREWS, RUFUS (or RUBEN) F. (1895-1950). Private, 22nd Infantry, Company K; 2nd Developmental Battalion, Company G, United States Army. A native of New York City, Andrews completed two years of high school and worked as a clerk for the American Tobacco Company, according to his Draft Registration Card filed on June 5, 1917, at Manual Training High School (now John Jay High School) in Brooklyn. The aforementioned document also notes that he was 5′ 3″ tall, weighed 125 pounds, and had gray eyes and brown hair. His home address was 416 2nd Street in Brooklyn. He was subsequently drafted into the Army on May 21, 1918, and assigned as a private to Company K of the 22nd Infantry until September 13, when he was transferred to Company G, 2nd Developmental Battalion, from which he received an honorable discharge on November 22, 1918, eleven days after the armistice. Andrews did not serve overseas. His discharge included a 12.5 % disability “in view of occupation.” Development battalions were organized for soldiers who had literacy issues or minor mental or physical problems that would normally preclude them from service. According to the 1930 census, Andrews was single, lived in Brooklyn with his aging parents, and was employed as a clerk for lawyers. Although the 1940 census shows him to be unemployed and living at home in Brooklyn with his 80 year old step-mother, his military records indicate that he was admitted to the Roseburg Branch of the Home for Disabled Soldiers in Hampton, Virginia, in 1933; it is unclear if he was discharged from the Soldiers’ Home before 1940. The paperwork at the Soldiers’ Home noted that Andrews could read and write, worked as a clerk for a lawyer, and was Catholic. He died at the Northport Veterans Hospital in Northport, New York. On November 6, 1950, shortly after his death, Helen Andrews of 149 Pierrepont Street in Brooklyn, applied for a government-issued upright granite headstone with a Christian emblem, citing Rufus Andrews’s World War I service. Section 160, lot 11712.

andrews-rufus

ANKELMAN, RUDOLPH D. (1895-1918). Private first class, 307th Infantry, Company H, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A native Brooklynite, Ankelman’s Draft Registration Card reports that he was of medium height and weight with brown eyes and light hair. He was unmarried and was employed as a clerk at that time. Ankelman was inducted into the Army on July 17, 1917, and assigned to Company H of the 307th Infantry. He was shipped out to France on April 7, 1918. During World War I, the 307th Infantry was assigned to the 154th Infantry Brigade and became part of the 77th Infantry Division and served with distinction in the following campaigns in France: Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne, and Lorraine. Ankelman was killed in action on August 27, 1918. His last residence was 459 6 Avenue in Brooklyn. His remains were returned to the United States in 1921 and were interred on June 6, 1921. On April 16, 1932, Lavinia Adami applied for a government-issued headstone citing Ankelmann’s World War I service. His surname was spelled with two n’s on the headstone paperwork. Section 206, lot 27769, grave 1.

ANNABLE, OLIVER STEVENSON (1890-1952). Field clerk, Headquarters Eastern Department, United States Army. Annable was born in Brooklyn. According to the 1910 census, he was employed as a stenographer at a heating company. As per his Draft Registration Card for World War I, filed at Manual Training High School (now John Jay High School), he claimed exemption from military service because of bad eyesight and the aftereffects of infantile paralysis (polio). At that time, he was described as of medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair and lived at 411 3rd Street in Brooklyn. Although he asked for an exemption, he nonetheless entered the United States Army on July 23, 1917. He was assigned as an Army field clerk at Headquarters of the Eastern Department located on Governor’s Island in New York Harbor. He was honorably discharged on September 12, 1919, having served stateside. The Registrar’s Report from his World War II Draft Registration on April 25, 1942, notes that Annable was 5′ 9″ tall, 175 pounds with blue eyes, brown and gray hair, and a ruddy, freckled complexion. He lived at 2807 Farragut Road in Brooklyn at that time. His last residence was 628 East 28th Street in Brooklyn. He died at Methodist Hospital in Brooklyn. On December 14, 1953, a year after his death, his family applied for a government-issued upright marble headstone and cited his World War I service at Headquarters. Section 202, lot 25915.

annable-oscar

ARNESEN, ERLING (1890-1945). Sergeant, 14th Infantry, New York State National Guard, Company C, United States Army. Originally from Stavanger, Norway, Arnesen’s family immigrated to the United States in 1904 and settled in Brooklyn. As per the census of 1910, he was single, living with his parents and siblings on 29th Street in Brooklyn, able to read and write, and working as a clerk. According to his Abstract of World War I Military Service, he enlisted as a corporal in the New York National Guard on April 20, 1914, and was assigned to the 14th New York Infantry. His muster roll reports that he worked as a correspondent. His family’s application for a government-issued headstone and his muster roll indicate that he was in Federal Service from July 31 to October 11, 1916, in the Mexican Punitive Campaign. During the Mexican Campaign, he was promoted to sergeant on September 6, 1916. He was honorably discharged on July 17, 1917. His World War I Abstract notes that he did not serve overseas or suffer any wounds during his military duty. Arnesen’s World War I Draft Registration Card, filed at Brooklyn on May 14, 1918, notes that he was employed by A.F. Langhorst as a salesman who worked at 100 Hudson Street in Manhattan, was a naturalized citizen, and lived at 204 33rd Street in Brooklyn with his wife and child. Arnesen was described on that form as 5′ 5 ½” tall with a fair complexion, slender build, blond hair and blue eyes. He also claimed an exemption from the draft and stated that he had served three years in New York State National Guard. He last lived at 37 South Union Avenue in Cranford, New Jersey; he died at Norwegian Hospital in Brooklyn. On February 27, 1945, Alpha Arnesen applied for a government-issued marble headstone citing his Federal Service. Section 3, lot 37192.

ARRISON, JR., ANDREW SWAYZE (1885-1959). Corporal, United States Marine Corps. Born in Newark, New Jersey, he lived in Elizabeth, New Jersey in 1909, and then in Jersey City as of 1910. Arrison enlisted in the United States Marine Corps on July 21, 1918, three months after the United States declaration of war against Germany. He was assigned to Company “U” at the Marine Barracks, Port Royale, South Carolina, where Marine recruits were sent to train. The facility was expanded extensively during the war and re-designated as Marine Barracks, Paris Island. Arrison was discharged on August 11, 1918. The 1920 census shows him to be single, able to read and write, and living on Belmont Avenue in Jersey City, New Jersey, with his father and seven other family members. The 1930 census shows that he lived in Hudson, New York; the Hudson City Directory of 1931 shows Arrison to be married and employed as a salesman. As per his World War II Draft Registration Card filed in 1942, he was living at 39 Parkwood Boulevard in Hudson, New York, and was employed by the Ontario Biscuit Company in Albany. He lived in Hudson at the time of the 1950 census. His last address was 20 Hanes Street in Albany, New York; he died at Albany Hospital. Four days after his death, Lorraine Arrison applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing his World War I service. Section 92, lot 1900.

marines-poster2

spirit-poster

BAHAN, CHESTER THOMAS (1874-1936). Plumber and fitter, United States Navy. Bahan was born in New York. At 43 years of age, he enlisted in the United States Navy on April 3, 1917, at the 3rd Naval Base located at Tompkinsville, Staten Island. He worked as a plumber and fitter for Mine Sweeping Squadron No. 10. Bahan received a citation for efficiency. He was honorably discharged on April 2, 1921. According to the 1930 census, he was employed as a master plumber for Sun business, owned his home valued at $6,500, and owned a radio set. His last address was 10 Edwin Street, Bay Shore, New York. The town of Islip, Long Island, included his name and service record in their archives honoring local veterans who served in World War I. The archive was dedicated to General of Armies John J. Pershing and includes this quote attributed to Pershing, “…I pay supreme tribute to our officers and soldiers of the line. When I think of their heroism, their patience under hardship, their unflinching spirit of offensive action, I am filled with emotion which I am unable to express. Their deeds are immortal and they have earned the eternal gratitude of our country.” On March 10, 1936, soon after his death, Bahan’s family applied for a government-issued marble headstone, citing his Naval service in World War I. Section 143, lot 27674.

Chester Bahan

Chester Bahan

General of Armies John J. Pershing

BAKER, HAROLD V. (1899-1918). Seaman 2nd class, United States Navy. Baker was born in Boston, Massachusetts, and was unmarried. He enrolled at the Federal Rendezvous in Brooklyn on March 5, 1918, and joined the United States Navy as a seaman 2nd class. He began training at the Naval Training Camp in Pelham Bay Park, New York, on March 22. On October 7, 1918, he fell ill and was admitted to the Naval Hospital there; he died of pleurisy on November 11. His last address was 1237 83rd Street, Brooklyn. Section 131, lot 35146, grave 1.

baker-gravestone

BARNABY, HENRY T. (1898-1918). Corporal, 14th Regiment, New York State National Guard, Company G; 106th Infantry, Company G, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Barnaby, who was born in Brooklyn, was listed as single and living with his parents according to the census of 1910. On April 16, 1917, he enlisted in the 14th Regiment of the New York State National Guard and was promoted to corporal on October 9 of that year. Barnaby was sent overseas with the 106th Infantry (a unit that had its roots in the 23rd Regiment with strong support from the 14th Regiment) on May 10, 1918. On September 27, 1918, he was killed in France while his unit was engaged in action along the Hindenburg Line, a German defensive position along their Western Front. His father was notified of his death. He last lived at 12 Waldorf Court in Brooklyn. After his remains were returned to the United States, Barnaby was re-interred on April 19. 1921. Section 5, lot 34355, grave 3.

BARNUM, WILLIAM PECK (1861-1929). Boatswain’s mate, United States Navy. A Brooklynite by birth, Barnum was stationed as a boatswain’s mate on the USS Wilmington during World War I. As per the 1920 census, he was married, able to read and write, living at 21 Clinton Avenue in Newport, Rhode Island, and working as a boatswain’s mate in the United States Navy; the 1925 Newport City Directory lists him at the same home address and his occupation as helper. He last lived at 21 Clinton Avenue in Newport, Rhode Island; his death was attributed to senility. On July 16, 1931, Loretta Barnum, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her husband’s World War I service. Section 68, lot 3844.

BEALE, SETH (1902-1954). Private, Quartermaster Corps, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. He was born in Bayville, New Jersey, as per his Military Abstract and the 1830 census, though some documents list his birthplace as New York. He lived in New York at the time of the 1910 census. Beale enlisted in the United States Army at Fort Slocum, New York, on June 6, 1918, when he was in fact only 16 years old, although the minimum age of enlistment was 18. But his Army paperwork indicates that he was 19 at the time of his enlistment. He lived at 33 West 127th Street at that time. Beale was assigned to Motor Truck Company 453 until August 6, 1918, probably at Camp Upton in Yaphank, Long Island. He was then transferred to the Replacement Draft Camp in Johnston, Florida, before being re-assigned to the Quartermaster Corps-at-Large. According to his New York State Abstract of World War I Military Service, Beale served abroad, in a non-combat role, from September 1, 1918 until July 19, 1919, when he was honorably discharged. The 1920 census shows that he was single, lived in the Bronx with his mother, and was employed as a factory laborer. The 1930 census shows him to be married, living in a rooming house in New York City, able to read and write, and employed as a taxi driver. He last lived at 131 West 70th Street in New York City. Beale died at the Veterans Hospital #81 in Bronx, New York. On November 11, 1954, Alma Noonan, his sister, applied for a government-issued headstone with Christian emblem, citing his World War I service. Section 69, lot 3580.

BELL, EDWARD JAMES (1896-1920). Unknown soldier history. A Bronx native, Bell died in France of pneumonia on July 21, 1918. The details of his service are unknown. He last lived at 10 Sherman Avenue in the Inwood section of New York City. After the war, his body was returned to the United States and he was interred on December 23, 1920. Section 177, lot 14025.

BELL, JR., ROBERT JOHN (1888-1930). First lieutenant, 104th Infantry, 26th Division; 107th Infantry, Supply Company, 27th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Bell was a native of New York City. According to the census of 1900, he lived in Manhattan; the census of 1910 reports that he was single and lived with his parents on West 18th Street in Manhattan. He enlisted on April 2, 1917. His New York State Abstract of Military Service notes that he was appointed a second lieutenant on July 17, 1918, from the National Guard. He trained at Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, assigned to the 104th Infantry. He was shipped overseas on May 9, 1918, where his unit served in France. The 104th, which was part of the 26th Division, suffered heavy casualties and participated in many offensives including Chemin Des Dames, Apremont, Campagne-Marne, Aisne Marne, St. Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne; Bell’s Military Abstract notes that he was not wounded during his duty. Bell was appointed first lieutenant on December 8, 1918. As per his family’s application to the War Department, which acknowledged his service in the 104th Infantry, Bell also served as a first lieutenant in the Supply Company of the 107th Infantry. The 107th was a regiment of the New York State National Guard that was called into federal service in 1917. They went overseas as part of the 27th Division. Bell returned to the United States on April 19, 1919, and was discharged on April 28, 1919. The census of 1920 indicates that he was still living on West 18th Street with his parents and sister, and worked as an inspector. According to the census of 1930, he had married at age 30, lived at 308 West 18th Street, was a salesman in the trucking industry, and was a veteran of the World War. He died from heart failure in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. As per his obituary, he was an employee of the Brazilian branch of the Electric Bond and Share Company of New York; the obituary noted that his body would be shipped home. As per the report of the American Consular Service, his embalmed body, as well as his personal effects, were to be shipped to his sister, Ruth Bell, who was an employee of that same company. On June 11, 1940, Ruth Bell applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her brother’s wartime service. Section 187, lot 18772, grave 3.

BELMER, LOUIS G. (1895-1980). Unknown rank, United States Army. Belmer was born in New York. As per the census of 1915, he was living in Queens. According to the Department of Veteran Affairs Death Files, Belmer enlisted in the United States Army on September 28, 1917, and served until his discharge on May 9, 1919. No other information is known. The 1930 census reports that he was married and lived at 5911 Fourth Avenue in a rental with his wife and daughter; that census reports that he owned a radio set, was a veteran of the World War and worked as a tax searcher for a real estate company. The census of 1940 notes that he was living with his wife, Christina, and teenage daughter at 5705 Fourth Avenue in Brooklyn, where the rent was $23.00 per month. At that time, he was employed as a tax searcher at a trust company; that census noted that he had completed eighth grade and had earned $1,650 in 1939. Section 127, lot 16311, grave 3.

BENDIKSEN, JALMAR BENJAMIN (1895-1961). Private first class, 305 Infantry, Company M, 77th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Kristiansand, Norway, Bendiksen immigrated to Brooklyn in about 1914. He was inducted into the United States Army on September 20, 1917, and assigned to Company M of the 305th Infantry, 77th Division, receiving his basic training at Camp Upton in Yaphank, Long Island. The 77th, known as the “Statue of Liberty Division” and consisting mostly of New York City draftees, was the first division composed of draftees to arrive in France in April 1918. Bendiksen shipped out with his unit on April 16. He was promoted to private first class on August 1, 1918, and saw action at Baccarat, Vesle, Oise-Aisne, and Meuse-Argonne. The 77th Division sustained 10,194 casualties during its service in France. Bendiksen was wounded on August 16, 1918, for which he was awarded the Purple Heart. He returned from France on April 24, 1919, and was honorably discharged on May 9, 1919, upon his unit’s demobilization. On June 6, 1919, he became a naturalized citizen. The 1920 census shows that he was single, lived with his brother-in-law’s family in Brooklyn, and worked as a shipmate on a tug boat. In 1920, he applied for a passport to visit his parents in Europe and indicated that he was a naturalized citizen and had served in World War I. The 1940 census lists him as married with a son, living in a rented apartment on 78th Street in Brooklyn, having completed eighth grade, and working as a barge captain. His World War II Draft Registration Form, filed in 1942, reports that he lived at 473 78th Street in Brooklyn and worked for the Marine Department of the Lehigh Valley Railroad in Jersey City; that document indicated that he had no telephone. He last lived at 473 78th Street in Brooklyn and died at the Brooklyn Veterans Hospital. One month after his death, his wife, Susan Bendiksen, applied for a government-issued headstone with Latin cross, citing her husband’s World War I service. Section 39, lot 38325.

BERBENICH, CHARLES JOHN (or L.) (1889-1938). Private, 343rd Machine Gun Battalion, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A New York City native, Berbenich had been working as a special deputy sheriff for Kings County when he registered for the draft on June 5, 1917. At that time, he was single and described himself as short and slender with blue eyes and brown hair; he then lived at 271 East 9th Street in Brooklyn. He was inducted into the United States Army on May 25, 1918, and was sent to Camp Hancock in Georgia for training with the Provisional Machine Gun Company 5. On July 29, 1918, he went overseas and was assigned to the 343rd Machine Gun Battalion, part of the 90th Infantry Division, American Expeditionary Forces. The division was stationed in the IV Corps with headquarters in Neufchateau, France. They formed part of the Saint Mihiel salient, an area projecting into enemy territory surrounded on three sides by German forces. After the armistice on November 11, 1918, the unit moved into Germany on November 17 and stayed until demobilized on May 11, 1919. Berbenich returned to the United States on June 27, 1919, and was honorably discharged at Camp Upton, New York, on July 4. After marrying in 1925, the census of 1930 reports that he lived at 1501 East 10th Street in Brooklyn, was employed as a chauffeur in the taxi industry, owned a radio set, and was a World War veteran. Berbenich last lived at 778 East 10th Street in Brooklyn. He died at the Veterans Hospital in the Bronx. The cause of his death was nephritis. Belle Berbenich, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem on July 11, 1939, citing her husband’s World War I service. Section 163, lot 14666.

ammunition-poster

BERNTSEN, BERNARD (1896-1958). Seaman second class, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Navy. Berntsen was born in Brooklyn, the son of immigrant parents from Norway. As per his Draft Registration Form of June 5, 1917, he was single, worked as a shipping clerk in Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, and lived at 562 49th Street in Brooklyn. The tall, medium-built young man with blue eyes and brown hair enlisted in the United States Navy on May 24, 1918, and was assigned to the Receiving Barracks, 2nd Naval District in Newport, Rhode Island, for training as a seaman second class. On August 27, 1918, Berntsen was transferred to a receiving ship in New York Harbor. During World War I, a receiving ship housed newly recruited sailors awaiting assignment. On October 21, 1918, he shipped out to the Naval Air Station at the port of Pauillac, France. The air station served as an assembly and repair facility until the end of the war. Berntsen returned to the States on November 11, 1918, the day of the armistice. He received his honorable discharge from 3rd Naval District Headquarters, New York City, on September 29, 1919. According to the 1920 census, Berntsen was single, worked in the wholesale hardware business, and lived with his parents and five siblings on 6th Avenue in Brooklyn. The 1930 census shows him to be single, able to read and write, working as a clerk for the Gas Company, and living with his father and five siblings at 570 Senator Street in Brooklyn. The 1940 census reports that he was married and living with his wife and two sons in a rented apartment at 552 62nd Street in Brooklyn; he was employed in the shipping business and had completed 8th grade. Bernsten’s World War II Draft Registration Card notes that he worked for the Kresge Company and lived at 630 49th Street in Brooklyn. He last lived at 437 16th Street in Brooklyn. He died in a subway station; further details are not known. Section 134, lot 34462.

BLAD (or BLAB), HARRY CARL (1889-1927). Electrician second class, United States Navy. A Brooklyn native, the 1910 census reports that he was single, living in a boardinghouse on Pearl Street, and working as a bookkeeper for an electrical company. As per his Draft Registration Card in 1917 he was living at 29½ Eastern Avenue in Waterbury, Connecticut, and working as an electrician for the Scovill Manufacturing Company in Waterbury. At that time, he described himself as single, tall, slender, with blue eyes and brown hair. At the time of enlistment he was back in New York living at 2114 Tiebout Avenue in the Bronx. He entered the United States Navy on April 26, 1918, at the Naval Training Camp in Pelham Bay Park, New York, with the rank of electrician second class. As of July 31, 1918, he was on board the USS Wilhelmina, a receiving ship, where he was stationed until November 11, 1918. After the armistice, he was on inactive duty within the 3rd Naval District and received an honorable discharge on March 21, 1922. The 1925 New York State census reports that he was an electrician, living in the Bronx. His last address was in Los Angeles, California. His death was attributed to electrocution. Shortly after his death, Elsie Blad, his widow, applied to the War Department for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing Blad’s World War I service. Section 205, lot 31058, grave 3.

BLAISDELL, WILLIAM E. (1887-1918). Captain, 14th New York State National Guard, Company L; 106th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Originally from Gloucester, Massachusetts, Blaisdell joined the 14th New York State National Guard as a second lieutenant on January 15, 1909, rose to first lieutenant on November 11, and resigned on September 16, 1910. During a period of unrest between the United States and Mexico, he re-enlisted as a captain at the 14th Armory on June 27, 1916, and mustered into U.S. service on August 2. As per his muster roll for the Mexican Punitive Campaign of 1916-1917, an unsuccessful attempt to capture Pancho Villa which was ultimately handled diplomatically, Blaisdell was married and worked as a broker. He was 5′ 7½” tall with red hair, blue eyes and a fair complexion. He mustered out with his company at Brooklyn on October 11, 1916. During World War I, he returned to the 14th National Guard on July 15, 1917, and was mustered into Federal service with the 106th Infantry (a unit that had its roots in the 23rd Regiment with strong support from the 14th Regiment). The 106th trained in Camp Wadsworth, South Carolina, and Hoboken, New Jersey, before being sent overseas on May 21, 1918, to join the American Expeditionary Forces. Blaisdell was killed in action in France on September 29, 1918, along the Hindenburg Line, a German defensive position along their Western Front. As per his New York State Abstract of World War I Military Service, he was awarded a silver star citation. George F. Blaisdell, his father, who lived at 45 Hampton Place in Brooklyn, was notified of his death. He last lived at 1807 Avenue K in Brooklyn. His body was returned to the United States and he was re-interred on March 20, 1921. Section 131, lot 32408, grave 3.

BOGGS, FRANK SEELY (1896-1952). Corporal, 114th Infantry, Company E, 29th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Weston, New Jersey, Boggs’s Draft Registration Form, dated June 5, 1917, shows him to be tall, of medium build, with grey eyes and light hair. He was single, living in Asbury Park, New Jersey, and was employed as an auto machinist. Boggs claimed an exemption from the draft because his family depended on him for support. Nonetheless, he entered the Army on July 24, 1917, and was assigned to Company E of the 114th Infantry, 29th Division. The 29th, which was formed in 1917 and nicknamed the “Blue and Grey” division, and was deployed to France as part of the American Expedition Forces. By June 1918, it was serving on the Western Front and joined the Meuse-Argonne offensive in September. During 21 days of combat, the 29th Division suffered 30 percent casualties. Before Boggs’s honorable discharge on May 16, 1919, he achieved the rank of corporal. According to the 1930 census, he was living at 122 Park Place in Bradley Beach, New Jersey, with his wife and two adult children, could read and write, was a World War veteran, and was employed as a machinist in the auto industry. His World War II Registration Card indicates that he was living in Neptune, New Jersey, had a telephone, and was a self-employed farmer. His last address was 400 Sycamore Street in Neptune, New Jersey. Shortly after his death, Mary K. Boggs, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing Boggs’s World War I service. Section 156, lot 24847.

BOTHWELL, HAROLD B. (1893–1921). Private, 150th Machine Gun Battalion, Company D, 306th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in New York City, Bothwell’s Draft Registration Card shows that he was employed as a railroad office clerk at the Barclay Street Freight Station prior to military service. Inducted into the Army on September 10, 1917, at Mount Vernon, New York, he did his basic training at Camp Upton on Long Island before shipping out to France on February 17, 1918. Bothwell fought in all the major U.S. engagements: Champagne, Alsace Lorraine, St. Mihiel, and Chateau Thierry, and was wounded on September 12, 1918. He returned to the States on April 20, 1919, and was discharged at Camp Upton on April 26. His last residence was 144 South 13th Avenue, Mount Vernon. Bothwell died of a chronic cardiac condition at Fox Hill Hospital on Staten Island. Section 17, lot 17245, grave 1441.

BOTHWELL, HAROLD E. (1886–1918). Second lieutenant, 306th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army; sergeant, Headquarters Department; private, 350th Machine Gun Battalion, Company C. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Bothwell attended P.S. 78 and Manual Training High School (now John Jay High School). He was single, living with his parents, and employed as a linotype machinist for a printing house, according to the 1910 census. By the time he registered for the draft on June 5, 1917, he was married and was working as a supervisor in the printing business. His Draft Registration Card lists him as tall and of medium build with grey eyes and brown hair. Bothwell was inducted into the army on September 19, 1917, assigned to Company C of the 350th Machine Gun Battalion, transferred to the Headquarters Detachment on November 2, and was promoted to private first class on November 15. Subsequent promotions were to corporal on December 3, and to sergeant on June 15, 1918. According to New York Abstracts of World War I Military Service records, Bothwell was discharged to accept a commission prior to leaving for overseas duty. Bothwell was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 306th Infantry on July 12, 1918. As per an article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on August 9, 1918, he had graduated from officers’ training school at Camp Upton, Long Island. He was killed in action on August 14, 1918, in the Bois de Dole, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, an area of much carnage in France throughout the entire war. The article in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reports that he was named on the Baptist Temple Honor Roll. His last residence was 265 Union Street in Brooklyn. After his remains were returned to the United States, he was re-interred on June 5, 1921. Section 187, lot 35771, grave 2.

Harold E. Bothwell

Harold E. Bothwell

BOWNE (or BONNE), HAROLD S. (1895-1958). Private first class, 305th Infantry, Company B, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A Brooklynite by birth, Bowne attended Boys Commercial High School there. Bowne was inducted into the United States Army at Local Board 22 on February 27, 1918, and was assigned to Company B of the 305th Infantry Regiment. Subsequently, he was transferred to Headquarters Company of the 305th. On April 16, 1918, he went overseas with the unit as part of the 77th Infantry Division under the command of Major General George Duncan. In June of that year, Bowne was promoted to private first class. The 77th Infantry was assigned to the II Corps and participated in the second battle of the Somme and the third battle of Albert, mostly serving alongside the New Zealand Division and the Australian Corps. After the armistice in November, they were reassigned to the 3rd Army before being demobilized on February 1, 1919. On July 29, 1919, Bowne returned to the United States and on August 4, 1919, he was honorably discharged. According to the 1930 census, he was single, living in Brooklyn at 493 Decatur Street with his mother, was a World War veteran and was employed as a manager at a steam company. As per his Draft Registration Form for World War II in 1942, he was still living at 493 Decatur Street, was not employed and had a telephone. He last lived at 493 Decatur Street. On April 8, 1958, shortly after his death, Frida Bowne applied for a government-issued gravestone citing Bowne’s World War I service. Section 95, lot 9952.

BOYD, ARNOLD R. (1892–1922). Private first class, School of Military Aeronautics, United States Army. Born in South Carolina, Boyd moved to New York City and, according to the 1920 census, was single and employed as a lawyer. On February 6, 1918, he joined the Army as a private first class at the Enlisted Reserve Corps in New York City. Boyd was sent to the Aviation Concentration Center in Dallas, Texas, until June 27 when he was assigned to the School of Military Aeronautics in Austin, Texas. He did not see service abroad and was honorably discharged on December 13, 1918. Boyd’s last residence was 56 8th Avenue, New York City. He died at the U.S. Naval Hospital. Section 126, lot 5047, grave 508.

BOYLE, ROBERT JOSEPH (1897-1938). Fireman third class, United States Navy. A Brooklyn native, he lived at 3130 Ocean Avenue when he registered for the draft on June 5, 1917. As per his Draft Registration Card, Boyle was described as of medium height, slender build, with brown eyes and brown hair. At that time, he was working as a clerk for Bert McLaughlin on Ocean Avenue. He joined the United States Navy and served from April 16, 1918 through May 5, 1919, achieving the rank of fireman third class aboard the USS Agamemnon, a troopship that delivered soldiers to the front and later brought troops home to the United States. According to the 1920 census, he lived with his mother and two brothers and was employed as a teacher; he lived at 3130 Ocean Avenue at the time of the New York State census of 1925. He last lived at 3130 Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn. On March 14, 1938, he was found drowned at the foot of Gain Court and Broad Creek in Brooklyn. Upon his death, his mother, Margaret Boyle, applied to the War Department for a government-issued gravestone, citing her son’s service in the World War. Section 188, lot 15886.

BOYLES, ROBERT EDWIN (1899-1947). Rank unknown, United States Navy. Boyles was born in Mannington, West Virginia. According to the 1910 census, the family was living in Franklin Township in Greene County, Pennsylvania; they were living in Waynesburg, Pennsylvania, on September 12, 1918, as per Boyle’s World War I Draft Registration Card. That document states that he was a college student who had gray eyes, brown hair and was of medium height and build. Boyles enlisted in the United States Navy in September 1918. Three months after his enlistment, he was discharged from active duty on December 12, 1918, whereupon he entered the United States Naval Reserve. In 1923, when he resided in Alleghany County, Pennsylvania, he applied for a passport in order to accept a job as a teacher at the American School Foundation in Mexico City; he indicated that his wife would accompany him and that he would visit Mexico and Cuba. The school that hired Boyle utilized the most up-to-date teaching methods that were then in use in the United States. He registered at the American Consulate in Mexico City in July 1923 when he began his teaching position; at that time he reported that he had never before resided outside of the United States. He remained active in the Navy Reserves throughout his life. During World War II, he held the rank of lieutenant commander and was commanding officer of a training unit in the Navy V-12 program designed to supplement the number of officers in the Navy and the Marine Corps. He was discharged from the Reserves on December 20, 1945. He last lived at 17 Park Avenue in Manhattan. In August 1948, his family applied for a government-issued upright marble headstone citing Boyles’s service in World Wars I and II. Section 192, lot 23517, grave 1.

boyles-robert-stone

BRAUN, JOHN MELVIN (1893-1930). Sergeant, 306th Infantry, Company B, 77th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A native New Yorker, he was living with his family in Brooklyn on Pacific Street, as per the 1910 census. Braun’s Draft Registration Form, dated June 5, 1917, shows him to be single, of medium height and build, with blue eyes and dark brown hair. At that time, he was living on Sedgwick Place in Brooklyn and employed as a clerk with Johnson and Higgins, an insurance company. Braun was inducted into the United States Army on December 6, 1917, and, after training, was assigned to Company B of the 306th Infantry, 77th Division. The 77th was known familiarly as the “Statue of Liberty Division” because it was composed mostly of New York City recruits. It was also the first division made up of draftees to arrive in France. Braun was promoted to corporal on January 15, 1918, before shipping out to France on April 6, and then was promoted to sergeant on July 23, 1918. The 77th Division saw action at Chateau-Thierry and Meuse-Argonne, sustaining over 10,000 casualties during its eight months of wartime service in France. Braun returned from France on April 25, 1919, and received his honorable discharge on May 9, 1919, upon demobilization of the 77th Division. According to the 1920 census, he was single, living on Sedgwick Place in Brooklyn with his parents and six siblings, and was employed as a clerk in the insurance industry. His last residence was 6650 Sedgwick Place in Brooklyn. On November 11, 1938, Helen Braun applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem for John Braun, citing his World War service. Section D, lot 21261.

Badges of the 77th Division

BRISTOW, ARTHUR ESTELL (1895-1918) Seaman second class, United States Navy. Born in Bristol, Rhode Island, he attended Columbia University in New York City, as per the school’s 1913 year book. He worked for the Brooklyn Trust Company before enlisting in the Naval Reserve. Bristow’s 1917 Draft Registration Card shows him to be single, tall and slender, with grey eyes and dark brown hair. He was employed in building construction in New York City. On January 22, 1918, Bristow went to the Naval Recruiting Station in Brooklyn and enrolled as a seaman second class. From February 5 to April 2, he attended the Naval Training Camp at Pelham Bay, New York. On April 2, he was admitted to the base’s Naval Hospital where he succumbed to phthisis (tuberculosis) on June 15, 1918. He was a member of the Sheepshead Bay M.E. Church and last lived at 1021 Ocean Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 131, lot 34800, grave 1.

BROOKS, JR., JOHN J. (1898-1958). Corporal, Fort Hamilton, Company 26; Fort Tilden, Companies 27 and 15, Coast Defenses of Southern New York, United States Army. Born in Brooklyn, Brooks enlisted in the United States Army at Fort Hamilton on August 3, 1918. He lived at 547 18th Street at that time. He served there in Company 26 and was promoted to corporal on October 17. On November 23, Brooks was transferred to Fort Tilden and assigned to Company 27 of Southern New York and then, on December 18, re-assigned to Company 15, Coast Defenses of Southern New York. While Fort Hamilton pre-dates the Civil War, Fort Tilden was established in 1917 to fortify the peninsula at Rockaway, New York. Its defenses initially consisted of two six inch pedestal mounted batteries. When the war ended on November 11, 1918, most of the troops stationed there were re-assigned; Brooks was part of a small contingent of soldiers who remained on site as caretakers, until his honorable discharge on March 20, 1919. According to the census of 1930, Brooks was married, lived in a rented apartment with his wife and infant daughter at 19 East 21st Street in Brooklyn, owned a radio set and was a veteran of the World War. He worked as a trust officer in the banking business. By 1935, he and his family moved to Westchester, New York, where they owned their home at 60 Fernwood Road in Mamaroneck and he continued to be employed in the banking business; in 1940, he earned $5,000 a year and had completed four years of college. Brooks died in Florida where his last residence was 10387 51st Street in St. Petersburg. Five months after his death, on September 16, 1958, Florence Brooks, his widow, applied for a government-issued gravestone with no religious marking, citing his World War I service. Section 39, lot 38325, grave 329.

BROSTROM, GUSTAVE (or GEORGE) ADOLPH (1896-1960). Private first class, 336th Field Artillery, Headquarters Company; Military Police, 250th Company, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Antrim, Pennsylvania, Brostrom was employed as a comptometer (key-driven calculator) operator by the Buffalo, Rochester, and Pittsburgh Railroad when he registered for the draft on June 5, 1917. His Draft Registration Card indicates that he was single, of medium height and build with blue eyes and dark brown hair. He was inducted into the United States Army at Rochester, New York, on May 26, 1918, and assigned to the Headquarters Company of the 336th Field Artillery. At that time, he lived at 49 Vick Park in Rochester. He shipped out to France on August 27, 1918, was re-assigned to the 250th Company of the Military Police on November 29, and was promoted to private first class on December 3, 1918. Brostrom returned home on June 28, 1919, and received an honorable discharge on July 3, 1919. According to the 1920 census, Brostrom was a lodger in Washington, D.C., and worked as an auto mechanic. His World War II Draft Registration Card of 1942 shows that he was married, had a telephone, lived at 7511 Colonial Road in Brooklyn, and was employed by the Wall Street brokerage firm of Harris Upham & Company. He still lived at 7511 Colonial Road at the time of his death. On March 22, 1961, Lillian Brostrom, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with no religious emblem, citing her husband’s World War I service. Section 39, lot 38325, grave 919.

brostrom-artillery

BROWN, GEORGE (1876-1931). Chief water tender, United States Navy. Brown was born in Brooklyn. When Brown enlisted in the United States Navy on February 10, 1917, was living at 394 19th Street in Brooklyn. As per his Military Abstract for World War I, he enlisted in the United States Navy aboard a receiving ship in New York City; receiving ships were berthed in the harbor to house newly recruited sailors before they were assigned to a ship. He first served aboard the USS Jenkins from April 6, 1917 to November 14, 1917, when he transferred to the USS Jarvis and served aboard that vessel until October 26, 1918, with the rank of water tender. A water tender, also called a fireman or stoker, tended to the fires and boilers in a ship’s engine room. From October 26 to November 11 1918, Armistice Day, he served on a receiving ship in Philadelphia as chief water tender. Brown was discharged from the Navy on January 5, 1921. His last address was 394 19th Street. He succumbed to pneumonia at Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn. On November 19, 1931, Esther Bennert, who also lived at 394 19th Street, applied to the War Department for a government-issued headstone, citing Brown’s service in the Navy during the World War. Section 48, lot 5246.

BULMAR, RAY GREENE (1876-1918). Unknown military history. A Brooklyn native, the 1907 Brooklyn Directory listed him as a reporter. Bulmar’s death at sea on May 3, 1918, was caused by strangulation. He was buried five days later. There is no other information available. His last residence was on Quincy Street in Brooklyn. Section 193, lot 27627.

BYRNES, WILLIAM HARRISON (1888-1918). Private, 58th Infantry, Company 4; 116th Infantry, Company K, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Byrnes was born in Brooklyn. As per his Draft Registration Card filed on June 5, 1917, he was living at 989 Hancock Street in Brooklyn, and was described as single, 5′ 6″ tall, 138 pounds with blue eyes and brown hair. At that time, he was working as an electro-typer, a tradesman who created metal plates used in printing, at a company located at 504 West 24th Street in Manhattan. Byrnes was inducted into the United States Army on May 3, 1918, and trained at Camp McClellan, Alabama, in Company 4 of the 58th Infantry. He was then assigned to Company K of the 116th Infantry Regiment on May 10, and went overseas on June 15, 1918. The 116th became part of the 29th Infantry Division and sailed for Europe aboard the USS Finland disembarking at Saint-Nazaire in France. They fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. Taken ill with colitis, Byrnes died on November 7, 1918, a few days before the armistice was signed. His father, William Byrnes, was notified of his death. He was buried in France and was subsequently returned to the United States where he was re-interred on November 6, 1920. On September 26, 1927, Mrs. Rose Byrnes of 989 Hancock Street, most likely his mother, applied to the War Department for a government-issued headstone, citing William’s service in the 116th Infantry. Section 189, lot 17560.

CALDWELL, SAMUEL CAMERON SMITH (or SAMUEL C. S.) (1887-1955). Private, 51st Pioneer Infantry, Company B, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A New Yorker by birth, Caldwell was single, according to the 1910 census, single, living at 125th Street in Manhattan with his parents and four siblings, and employed as a driver for a linen supply company. His Draft Registration Card, filed on June 5, 1917, shows him to be of medium height and build, with brown eyes and hair, and working as a motor engineer for the Interborough Rapid Transit. He lived at 267 West 140th Street at that time. On May 28, 1918, Caldwell was inducted into the United States Army and assigned to Company B of the 51st Pioneer Infantry as a private. Consisting of mostly New York recruits, the 51st trained at Camp Wadsworth in South Carolina to provide engineering support for the 4th Corps, which was headed for service in France. The 51st arrived at Brest, France on August 8, 1918, and saw action at St. Mihiel. Caldwell’s New York State Military Abstract for World War I shows that he served in France from July 27, 1918 until May 25, 1919. Caldwell was awarded a Victory medal and received an honorable discharge on June 19, 1919. Upon his return to civilian life, the census for 1920 shows that he lived with his parents and two adult siblings on St. Nicholas Avenue in Manhattan and was employed as a motorman for an electric railroad. The 1940 census recorded that he remained single and lived with his parents on University Avenue in the Bronx where the rent was $50 per month, had completed an eighth grade education, and earned $2,280 that year. At that time, he was a motorman for the subway system. His World War II Draft Registration Card of 1942 indicates that he was working as a motorman for New York City Board of Transportation and lived at 1974 University Avenue in the Bronx. He last lived at 2047 Webster Avenue in the Bronx; he died at Kingsbridge Veterans Hospital in the Bronx. On January 3, 1956, Emily Harris applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing Caldwell’s World War I service. Section C, lot 35820, grave 1.

CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS NORMAN (1895-1918). Sergeant, 104th Machine Gun Battalion, 27th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army; private, 1st New York State Cavalry, Sanitary Detachment, New York State National Guard. A native of Brooklyn, the 1910 census reports that he was single and living on St. Marks Avenue with his parents and two siblings. As per his obituary, Campbell was a graduate of P.S. 9 and attended both Boys and Commercial High Schools. He was a choirboy at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Brooklyn and later became a well-known church singer, featured as a baritone soloist at St. John’s Episcopal Church in Manhattan. On July 9, 1917, Campbell enlisted as a private in the New York State National Guard and was assigned to the Sanitary Detachment, 1st New York State Cavalry. After the National Guard was federalized and reorganized, Campbell was assigned to the Sanitary Detachment, 104th Machine Gun Battalion, which was part of the 27th Division. The 27th was nicknamed “The New York Division.” Promoted to sergeant on April 8, 1918, Campbell arrived in France on May 17, 1918, and saw combat in both Belgium and France. On November 18, 1918, a week after the war ended, Campbell succumbed to pneumonia at the Army base hospital at Rouen, France. His last residence was 1230 Carroll Street in Brooklyn. His remains were returned home in July 0f 1921, and were re-interred on July 19. According to his obituary in The Brooklyn Eagle, dated July 17, 1921, Campbell was a member of the Apollo Club, which dedicated a tree in his memory in front of its clubhouse on Greene and Carlton Avenues in Brooklyn. Section 199, lot 28803.

CAMPBELL, DUNCAN (1893-1918). First lieutenant, 309th Infantry, Company M, 78th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Campbell is not buried at Green-Wood; his memory is honored by a cenotaph in his family’s lot. Campbell was born in Brooklyn. As per his Draft Registration Card, filed at Manual Training High School (now John Jay High School), he was a lawyer who worked for a firm at 350 Fulton Street in Brooklyn and lived at 319 8th Street. Campbell described himself as slender, of medium height with blue eyes and black hair. During World War I, he served as a first lieutenant in the 309th Infantry which was assigned to the 78th Division of the American Expeditionary Forces. On November 1, 1918, he was mortally wounded at Grand Pre, France, and died three days later. His name is listed among those buried at the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery in Romagne, France (Plot A, Row 1, Grave 6); the cenotaph at Green-Wood notes that the location is at Villers-Daucourt, France. Section ?, lot ?.

campbell-cenotaph

CASTLE, LEONARD S. (1893-1940). Private, 306th Regiment, Headquarters Company; Development Battalion, Company G. Born in Flatbush, Brooklyn, Castle was educated through the fourth year of high school. At the time of his enlistment on December 8, 1917, at Brooklyn Local Board 66, he was married with a three-year-old daughter and lived at 2257 Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn. He was sent to Camp Upton, New York, where he remained for the rest of his time in the military. He was in Headquarters Company of the 306th Regiment until April 20, 1918, whereupon he transferred to Company G, Development Battalion at Camp Upton. As per the application for a government-issued headstone, Castle’s military service was listed as the 1st Company, 5th Brigade of the Enlisted Ordnance Corps. He was honorably discharged on January 8, 1919, on demobilization of forces; he did not serve overseas. According to the 1930 census, Castle was working as a contractor in concrete, was living at 1135 East 28th Street, Brooklyn, a house that he owned, worth $14,000, and was a World War survivor. The 1940 census reports that the Castles were still living at the same address with their daughter and son-in-law and that his annual income was $2,000. He last lived at the East 28th Street address but died at 6 Woods Place in Brooklyn. The cause of his death was asphyxia. On November 13, 1940, Ruby Castle, his widow, applied for a marble headstone with Christian emblem, citing her husband’s World War service. Section 143, lot 31179.

CHEVALIER, EDWARD M. (or B.) (1894-1939). Corporal, Gas Defense Plant, United States Army. Chevalier was born in Jersey City, New Jersey. As per his Draft Registration Card dated June 5, 1917, he described himself as of medium height, slender build with blue eyes and brown hair. At that time, he lived at 12 Lott Street in Jersey City. He worked as an assistant ticketing agent for the Pullman Company in New York City. Chevalier claimed exemption from the draft as an only child whose parents were dependent upon him for support. Nonetheless, he entered the United States Army on March 12, 1918, and was assigned to the Gas Defense Plant, Field Testing Section. This unit was responsible for developing, testing and supplying offensive weapons using toxic or noxious gases, and developing defensive countermeasures. During his service, he attained the rank of corporal. He was discharged from the Army on December 18, 1918. As per the census of 1920, he was single, living on Lott Street in Jersey City with his parents, and employed as a railroad clerk; he is listed as a clerk in the 1920 New York City Directory. He last lived at 212 Duncan Avenue in Jersey City, New Jersey. His death was attributed to a brain tumor. Richard Chevalier, a family member, applied for a government-issued upright headstone in December 1939, citing Edward’s World War I service. Section 206, lot 31615, grave 1.

CHURCH, HOWARD A. (1899-1918). Private, 14th New York State National Guard, Company L; 106th Infantry, Company D, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A lifelong Brooklynite, Church enlisted at Brooklyn on July 23, 1917, and joined Company L of the 14th New York State National Guard. On October 15, 1917, he was transferred into Company D of the 106th Infantry and sent overseas on May 10, 1918. Church fought in the Battles of Dickebusch Lake and Kimmel in Belgium, the Hindenburg Line, and Cambrai-St. Quentin. He was killed in action in France on September 27, 1918. Annie Church, his mother, was notified about his death. He last lived at 328 40th Street in Brooklyn. His body was returned to New York and he was interred on March 20, 1921; he was moved to the current location on April 14, 1933. Section 129, lot 37341, grave 3.

CLINTON, EDGAR O. (1891-1918). Private, 116th Infantry, Company K, 29th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Jersey City, New Jersey, Clinton’s Draft Registration Card shows that he was single, living in Brooklyn, and was employed as a publisher of factory forms. He was tall, slender, and had blue eyes and light colored hair. On May 3, 1918, Clinton was inducted into the Army and assigned to Company K of the 116th Infantry on May 22. The 116th was part of the 29th Infantry Division, known as the “Blue and Grey” division, and saw extensive combat during the war. Clinton shipped out to France on June 15, 1918, and saw action at Haute, Alsace, Malbranch Hill, Molleville Farm, Boise d’ Ormont, Grand Montague, Etraye Ridge, Boise Belleu, St. Mihiel, and Meuse-Argonne. He survived horrific combat, but succumbed to lobar pneumonia on November 23, 1918, less than two weeks after the end of the war. His last residence was 10 Garfield Place in Brooklyn. His remains were returned to the United States in July 1921, and he was re-interred on July 23, 1918. Section 130, lot 35262.

CONWAY, HORACE E. (1894–1918). Sergeant, Headquarters Company, 3 Group Motor Truck Depot, Machine Gun Training Corps. Born and raised in Brooklyn, he was working as an office clerk, according to the 1915 New York State census. After registering for the draft, he was inducted into the Army on May 16, 1918, and sent to Camp Hancock, Georgia, where he was assigned to 31 Company 3 Group Motor Truck M Truck Depot Machine Gun Training Corps. On July 3, he was transferred to his unit’s Headquarters Company and promoted to sergeant on August 8. On November 3, 1918, Conway died of pneumonia. Horace and Theodore Conway (see) are buried in the same lot; they may have been brothers. His last residence was 500 Greene Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 131, lot 35138, grave 2.

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CONWAY, THEODORE C. (1895-1939). Mess sergeant, 23rd Infantry, New York State National Guard, Companies D, L, and Headquarters Company; 106th Infantry, Company L, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Conway was born in Brooklyn. According to the 1910 census, the family lived in Queens County; the family moved back to Brooklyn at the time of the 1915 New York State census. The 1920 census reports that he was single and living with his parents and siblings at 500 Greene Street in Brooklyn. On June 21, 1916, he enlisted as a private and mustered into Company D of the 23rd Infantry, New York State National Guard, on July 2. At that time, he was a bank clerk who was 5′ 7″ tall with a fair complexion and hazel eyes. His muster roll for the Mexican Punitive Campaign indicates that he was transferred to Headquarters Company on August 10, 1916. As per his New York State Abstract of World War I Military Service, he was assigned as a cook on September 17, 1916, and on October 18 he transferred to Company L of the 23rd Infantry as a private. On December 1, 1916, he was sentenced to thirty days at hard labor without confinement as per Special Order 122 (offense not recorded). He was promoted to corporal on August 12, 1917, to sergeant on December 8, 1917, and to mess sergeant on December 11, 1917. Along with the 106th Infantry, he went overseas on May 10, 1918. The unit participated in actions at the Marne and Mt. Kimmel. On August 1, 1918, he was severely wounded. On December 19, 1918, Conway returned to the United States and he was honorably discharged as a sergeant on April 4, 1919, with a reported disability of 45%. Horace (see) and Theodore Conway are buried in the same lot; they may have been brothers. He died from tuberculosis at Veterans Hospital #98 in Castle Point, New York. Section 131, lot 35138, grave 1.

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CORDES, PAUL HENRY. (1887-1918). First lieutenant, 1st Gas Regiment (30th Engineers), Company C, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A native of Altona, Germany, his Draft Registration Card reports that Cordes was a naturalized citizen who lived at 6347 Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, and was employed as a mechanical engineer. He was single and described as of short height, medium build with dark blue eyes and dark brown hair. As per his Abstract of World War I Military Service, he was called into service as a first lieutenant on September 5, 1917, and assigned to the 30th Engineers, stationed at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. At the time, Cordes lived at 231 Columbia Street in Brooklyn. He also trained at the American University in Washington, D.C., prior to going overseas with the American Expeditionary Force on March 27, 1918. The 30th Engineers, now known as the 1st Gas Regiment, was trained in the combat use of gas and flames in response to the German use of such weapons. The unit supported General John Pershing’s St. Mihiel action to capture the city of Metz. According to a history of the regiment written by James Thayer Addison, the regimental chaplain, on September 12, 1918, at the Bois La Petre, Lt. Cordes was one of its first battle casualties, severely wounded by a shell fragment “while observing the discharge of his projectors.” Cordes was moved from a dressing-station to Field Hospital #359 where he “lost consciousness and died within a few hours.” Addison wrote of Cordes in tribute to his nine months of service:

…Cordes had won, by his unusually high character, not only the respect but the unqualified devotion of officers and men. Every tribute a soldier would be proud to win was paid him genuinely and eagerly, for as an officer he had been a model of thoroughness and efficiency, and as a friend, his uniform courtesy and kindness were gratefully remembered. We have been the poorer for losing him, and we have missed him steadily.

For his action in battle, Cordes was awarded the French Croix de Guerre with gilt star, a medal awarded to those showing heroism in combat. He was buried with military honors in the St. Mihiel American Cemetery at Saizerais in the Meurthe-et-Moselle Department in northeastern France (grave 21, section 15, plot 3). His sister Anna, who lived at 231 Columbia Street in Brooklyn, was notified of his death. After his remains were returned to the United States, he was re-interred on June 15, 1921. Section 141, lot 23829, grave 1.

CORNWALL, ROBERT JOHN (1893-1950). Private, Quartermaster Corps, 327th Supply Company, United States Army. A New Yorker by birth, the 1910 census shows that Cornwall was single and lived on 16th Street in Brooklyn with his parents, two brothers, and a sister. He was employed as a copy boy at a telegraph office. The New York State census for 1915 shows him still living in Brooklyn with his father and his two brothers. On his World War I Draft Registration Card, dated June 5, 1917, he described himself as short and of medium build, with blue eyes and black hair. At that time, he lived at 614 49th Street in Brooklyn and was a paper-maker employed by Tidewater Mills. On May 28, 1918, Cornwall enlisted as a private in the United States Army and was assigned to the 327th Supply Company of the Quartermaster Corps. He was honorably discharged on April 23, 1919. The 1920 census reports that Cornwall was single, lived in Brooklyn on 49th Street with his father, and worked as a paper-maker in the newspaper industry. According to his World War II Draft Registration Card of 1942, Cornwall was a patient in the Sun Mount Veterans Hospital in Tupper Lake, New York; his home address at that time was 2537 East 19th Street in Brooklyn. This hospital was established in 1924 to treat veterans with tuberculosis. He died at the Veterans Hospital in Tupper Lake. On August 14, 1950, two months after his death, Mary A. Cornwall, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her husband’s service in World War I. Section 134, lot 37830, grave 552.

COX, FRANCIS CLEVELAND (1884-1954). Chauffer first class, 71st Balloon Company, United States Army Air Service. Cox was born in New York. On June 7, 1918, he enlisted in the United States Army and served with the 71st Balloon Company, a unit of the aviation section of the U.S. Signal Corps, U.S. Army. At the start of World War I, observation balloon units were organized into companies, squadrons, and wings. Each company was equipped with one balloon manned by a pilot. By the end of the war, 110 companies had been created. In the field, balloon companies were allotted to the ground units they supported as needed. Thirty-five companies made it to France with the American Expeditionary Forces; the 71st Balloon Company was not one of them. For his service, Cox was awarded a Victory Medal from New York State. On February 11, 1919, he was discharged. The 1930 census indicates that he was married with four children, was employed as a chauffeur for a private family, was renting his residence on East 82nd Street, could read and write but had not attended school. His last residence was at 217 East 82 Street in Manhattan. On January 24, 1955, Ingeborg Cox, his widow, applied for a government-issued upright marble headstone with a Christian cross; the application cited his World War I service. Section 4, lot 34121, grave 2.

Balloon, France 1918

Balloon, France 1918

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CROMWELL, DOROTHEA KATHARINE (1885-1919). Nurse, American Red Cross. Dorothea Cromwell is not buried at Green-Wood; an elaborate cenotaph in tribute to her memory and her World War I service stands in the family’s lot. Born in Brooklyn, Dorothea and Gladys (see) Cromwell, twin sisters, were descendants of Oliver Cromwell, the English military and political leader. The sisters were born into great wealth and inherited a fortune from their father, who had been a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York City. Their brother, Seymour Cromwell, who is buried in the family lot, was at one time president of the New York Stock Exchange. Gladys and Dorothea Cromwell were educated at private schools and traveled abroad before they decided to volunteer as American Red Cross nurses and travel to France during World War I. Stationed near the front, they worked at Chalon-sur-Marne and Verdun as nurses and in a canteen. Dorothea and Gladys became celebrities in France where they were described as “angels” and were admired for working under fire on long day and night shifts, sleeping under trees in the field, and experiencing fatigue under taxing conditions. The Cromwell sisters remained in France after the armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, but soon relented to their brother Seymour’s urging them to return home. On January 19, 1919, they boarded the SS La Lorraine at Bordeaux Harbor, for the journey back to New York. That same evening, the two women ventured out onto the windy, cold deck clasping hands. After separating, each sister climbed atop the ship’s rail and then disappeared into the waters below. Although United States Army Private Jack Pemberton and four other witnesses heard the splashes as their bodies hit the water, it took the ship a while to turn and come back to where they had jumped; a search failed to find their bodies. Despite Seymour Cromwell’s initial thoughts that his sisters would not have taken their own lives, a search of their cabin found four notes that indicated otherwise. Apparently, Dorothea was a victim of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), then referred to as “shell shock.” Her Red Cross supervisor, Miss Rogers, mistakenly attributed the illness to her “sympathetic” nature. Dorothea’s last residence was the apartment she shared with Gladys at 535 Park Avenue. A memorial service was held for the twin sisters at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Manhattan on February 5, 1919. The bodies of the sisters were recovered on March 20, 1919, and were buried, side by side, with full military honors, at the Surennes American Cemetery in France, overlooking Paris. Dorothea was posthumously awarded France’s Croix de Guerre, as was her sister, on March 22, 1919. The Croix de Guerre, a military decoration which was developed in 1915, is awarded to individuals who have performed heroic acts. In October 1919, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that the sisters had left an estate of $661,748-the equivalent of just over $9 million in 2017 money. On March 13, 1920, Dorothea and Gladys were awarded the Medaille de la Reconaissance. The aforementioned medal, created on July 13, 1917, was a French expression of gratitude to civilians who had come to the aid of the injured, disabled, refugees, or who had performed an act of exceptional dedication in the presence of the enemy during World War I. Section 70, lot 1792.

The Cromwell twins

The Cromwell twins

Dorothea's grave (at left) and Gladys Cromwell's grave (at right) at Surennes American Cemetery in France.

Dorothea’s grave (at left) and Gladys Cromwell’s grave (at right) at Surennes American Cemetery in France.

Stone, flush with the ground, at Green-Wood cemetery.

Stone, flush with the ground, at Green-Wood Cemetery.

CROMWELL, GLADYS LOUISE HUSTED (1885-1919). Nurse, American Red Cross.  Gladys Cromwell is not buried at Green-Wood; a elaborate cenotaph honoring her memory and World War I service stands in the family’s lot. Brooklyn natives, Gladys and Dorothea (see) Cromwell, twin sisters, were descendants of Oliver Cromwell. The sisters were born into great wealth and inherited a fortune from their father, who had been a trustee of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York City. Seymour Cromwell, their brother, who is buried in the family lot, was at one time president of the New York Stock Exchange. The Cromwell sisters were educated at private schools and traveled abroad. During World War I, they decided to volunteer as American Red Cross nurses and were sent to France where they worked at Chalon-sur-Marne and Verdun as nurses and in a canteen. In spite of her wealthy upbringing, Gladys worked on day and night shifts, visited soldiers in French hospitals and befriended French refugee children. Considered “angels,” the sisters were celebrities in France and much admired for “their efficiency and courage in real danger.” After the armistice was signed on November 11, 1918, the Cromwell sisters remained in France until they were urged home by their brother. On January 19, 1919, they boarded the SS La Lorraine at Bordeaux Harbor, for the journey back to New York. That evening, the two women ventured out onto the windy, cold deck and one by one, climbed atop the ship’s rail and then disappeared into the waters below. Although United States Army Private Jack Pemberton and four other witnesses heard the splashes as their bodies hit the water, it took the ship a while to turn and come back to where they had jumped; a search failed to find their bodies. Although Seymour Cromwell could not believe that his sisters took their lives, newspapers including the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, The New York Times and the Chicago Tribune confirmed the suicides. The Chicago paper on January 29, 1919, noted that four notes were found in the cabin that the sisters shared: one to Major James C. Sherman of Chicago, who led the contingent of Red Cross Workers, one to their brother, another to their sister-in-law, and a fourth to their girl friend. Although the term “shell shock” was used after World War I, the sisters were apparently suffering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD); their supervisor, Miss Rogers, attributed the condition to her sympathetic nature. Padraic Colum, later wrote of the sisters in his introduction to Gladys’s poetry book that they were two beings with a single soul. He said, “These sisters were like twin spirits caught into an alien sphere, strangely beautiful and strangely apart, and the heavy and unimaginable weight of the world’s agony became too great for them to bear.” The bodies of the sisters were recovered on March 20, 1919, and were buried, side by side, with full military honors, at the Surennes American Cemetery in France, overlooking Paris. Gladys was awarded France’s Croix de Guerre, as was her sister. She last lived with her sister at 535 Park Avenue. A memorial service was held for the twin sisters at St. Bartholomew’s Church in Manhattan on February 5, 1919. In October 1919, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that the sisters had left an estate of $661,748-the equivalent of just over $9 million in 2017 money. In late 1919, Gladys Cromwell’s book, Poems, was published; many of the pieces reflected “a tragic vision of life.” One sample is her poem, “The Mould”:

No doubt this active will,

So bravely steeped in sun,

This will has vanquished Death

And foiled oblivion.

But this indifferent clay,

This fine experienced hand,

So quiet, and these thoughts

That all unfinished stand.

Feel death as though it were

A shadowy caress:

And win and wear a frail

Archaic wistfulness.

On March 13, 1920, the Cromwell sisters were posthumously awarded the Medaille de la Reconaissance, a civilian medal awarded by France to those individuals who had come to the aid of the injured or had performed an act of dedication in the presence of the enemy during World War I. Section 70, lot 1792.

Gladys, in happier days, driving a coach in New York City.

Gladys, in happier days, driving a coach in New York City.

American Red Cross workers at the canteen for Hospitals 6 and 7 in Souilly, Meuse, France. Gladys Cromwell is second from left; Dorothea Cromwell is at far right.

American Red Cross workers at the canteen for Hospitals 6 and 7 in Souilly, Meuse, France. Gladys Cromwell is second from left; Dorothea Cromwell is at far right.

The Cromwell twins with soldiers of the French Army. Dorothea (left) is holding a pitcher and Gladys (right) is holding a basket.

The Cromwell twins with soldiers of the French Army. Dorothea (left) is holding a pitcher and Gladys (right) is holding a basket.

Cenotaph at Green-Wood

Cenotaph at Green-Wood

CULBERT, KENNETH PICKENS (1895–1918). Lieutenant, 1st Aero Squadron, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Marine Corps. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Culbert graduated from East Orange High School in New Jersey and entered Harvard University in 1917 as a 22-year-old freshman. Tall and slender with blue eyes and light-colored hair, Culbert had a very active freshman year as a member of the rowing and football teams as well as serving on the editorial staff of The Harvard Crimson. According to his May 1917 Draft Registration Card, he was also an infantry sergeant in Harvard’s Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). By 1918, Culbert was a United States Marine lieutenant positioned as an observer stationed in France with the 1st Aero Squadron. Observation/reconnaissance was an exceedingly dangerous job, flying low and slow over enemy lines to direct artillery or to take photos of front and reserve lines. While in France, Culbert witnessed the funeral of the popular French-American ace Major Raoul Lufbery. (Of his 17 air victories, 16 were with the French Air Force and one with the U.S. Army Air Service.) Below is an excerpt about Lufbery’s funeral from Culbert’s May 21, 1918, letter written to Professor C.T. Copeland which was printed in the Harvard Alumni Bulletin:

Perhaps you’d like to hear of Major Lufbery’s funeral-you doubtless know that he was shot down, and fell from his burning plane into a courtyard. He had done a great deal in uniting the French and Americans-he was the greatest of our airmen and seventh on the list of French aces-he had all the qualities of a soldier, audacity, utter fearlessness, persistency, and tremendous skill, in every way, sir, he was a valuable man.

As we marched to his interment the sun was just sinking behind the mountain that rises so abruptly in front of T; the sky was a faultless blue and the air was heavy with the scent of the blossoms on the trees in the surrounding fields. An American and French general led the procession, following close on to a band which played the funeral march and “Nearer My God to Thee” in so beautiful a way that I for one could hardly keep my eyes dry. Then followed the officers of his squadron and of my own-and after us an assorted group of Frenchman famous in the stories of this war, American officers of high rank, and two American companies of infantry, separated by a French one.

On the very next day, May 22, 1918, Culbert and his pilot Lieutenant Walter V. Barnaby were assigned to a low altitude photo reconnaissance of a portion of the German positions behind the main lines. Flying dangerously straight and level to help assure the clarity of the photos, they came under heavy anti-aircraft fire. Apparently struck by a shell on their way back to base, their plane became unmanageable, flipped over, and crashed just behind American lines. Pilot Barnaby was killed instantly and Culbert, unconscious, was taken to the American hospital at Sebastopol Farm, north of Toul, where he died without having regained consciousness. The subsequent camera recovery showed that these two brave men fully accomplished their assignment. For their gallantry, both Barnaby and Culbert received France’s Croix de Guerre–awarded to those exhibiting heroism in combat. The citation, in part, accompanying the aforementioned medal with bronze star states:

Second Lieutenant Kenneth P. Culbert. Young officer with a big heart animated with the purest sense of duty, who has demonstrated sang-froid, courage and determination in the course of several reconnaissance on the enemy. He was mortally wounded May 22, 1918.

The Harvard Crimson reported the death of its former editorial staff member, also stating that he had also been recognized for his outstanding work on April 20, 1918, near Seicheprey, France, under heavy fire and adverse weather conditions. Russell Fry, a friend, summed up Culbert’s character:

His life had been spent in the great out-door world, leaving him as free from the affectations of conventionalized man as the great seas which shattered themselves against that Maine island, his summer home. He was an essentially elemental character-honest, upright, unafraid; quick to applaud another’s accomplishments, equally quick to condemn his own shortcomings. And as his life was fearless, vigorous. Unselfish-so, too, was his death.

Culbert had been buried near the hospital where he died, but was re-buried at the American cemetery at Thiacourt in France. He last lived at 373 Williams Street in East Orange, New Jersey. At the request of his family, his remains were returned to the United States in the spring of 1921 and were re-interred at Green-Wood on June 7, 1921. On July 25, 1930, The New York Times reported that the War Department awarded a citation for gallantry in action to Kenneth P. Culbert of East Orange, New Jersey, serving as an observer with the First Aero Squadron, who successfully photographed enemy second line trenches under heavy fire from an altitude of 500 meters in the Toul sector on May 15, 1918. Culbert’s memory is still honored at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, by a silver urn on display there with an inscription that reads: “For the first Aero squadron, United States Army, of which Lt. Kenneth P. Culbert USMC was a member in appreciation of their kindness to him in life and death. Presented by his brother Lieutenant F. P. Culbert, U.S. Navy.” Section 165, lot 34985.

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CUTTING, ROBERT BAYARD (1875-1918). Associate organizing secretary of the Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA). A native of New York City, Cutting’s parents were a prominent society couple descended from Robert J. Fulton, the steam ship developer. They lived at 24 East 67th Street in Manhattan with their four children in an opulent four-story mansion described as a “limestone and brick chateau” and also had a summer home in Tuxedo Park, New York. The Cuttings were involved in a number of reform committees including the New York Milk Committee of the Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor. Robert Bayard Cutting was educated in the private schools at Cutler’s School in New York, Westminster School in Dobbs Ferry, Groton School in Massachusetts, then graduated from Harvard cum laude in 1897. After graduation, he taught at the Groton School for three years and then joined his father’s firm. He was an organizer of the Intercollegiate Civic League and became chairman of the New York Commission on Feeblemindedness and treasurer of the National Commission on Provision for the Feebleminded. In his leisure time, he played tennis and was among the earliest golfers. Cutting was a member of the Tuxedo, University, City and Harvard Clubs in New York City. At the onset of World War I, he became an associate organizing secretary for the YMCA. He left for France at his own expense, sailing on the Espagne on August 11, 1917. He worked for the French YMCA and was charged with opening new areas for the organization in advanced sections of the front. In the early spring of 1918, he was transferred to the National War Work Council of the American YMCA in France in close support of the United States Army. The YMCA was instrumental in administering to the spiritual and morale-boosting needs of soldiers, continuing the work begun during the Civil War and extended overseas during the Spanish-American War. In March 1918, Cutting became ill. When his condition worsened, he was operated upon but died on April 1 at an American base hospital in Chaumont, France. He last lived at 24 East 67th Street in Manhattan. Cutting’s remains were returned to the United States in 1921. His funeral on May 28, 1921, was officiated by the Right Reverend Charles H. Brent, Protestant Episcopal Bishop of the Philippines. Section 23, lot 6615/17.

Robert B. Cutting

Robert B. Cutting

Funeral of Robert B. Cutting

Funeral of Robert B. Cutting

DENINGER (or DENNINGER), JESSE J. (1897-1918). Corporal, 106th Infantry, Company E, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army; private, 14th Infantry, New York State National Guard, Company E. Born in Brooklyn, Deninger was living with his parents and employed as a florist according to the New York State census of 1915. He enlisted in the National Guard at Brooklyn on May 28, 1917, and was assigned to Company E of the 14th Infantry of the New York State National Guard. On October 16, he was transferred into Company E of the 106th Infantry. He was promoted to private first class on January 10, 1918, shipped out to France on May 10, and promoted to corporal on June 10. Deninger was killed in action on September 27, 1918. His last residence was 271 West Street in Brooklyn. His remains were returned home from France in 1922 and were interred on April 9, 1922. Section ?, lot 28265, grave 3.

Di BELLA, LOUIS (1893-1976). Private, 152nd Depot Brigade, Company G; 108th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Palermo, Italy, Di Bella immigrated to New York City on July 5, 1910. According to the New York State census of 1915, he was living with two brothers in New York City and was employed as a tailor. His World War I Draft Registration Card shows him to be short, of medium build with brown eyes and black hair. At that time, he was single, supported his father, and declared his intention to become a United States citizen. He was living at 506 West 147th Street in Manhattan when he was inducted into the Army on April 5, 1917. Initially assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade, Di Bella was transferred to Company G of the 108th Infantry on April 19. In November 1917, the 108th, whose motto became “By Valor, Not Words,” was assigned to the 54th Infantry Brigade of the 27th Division. On May 16, 1918, DiBella shipped out to France. Trained with British and Australian troops and weapons, the 108th Infantry did much of its fighting alongside these Commonwealth troops, suffering over 1,700 casualties, including 331 dead in three months of combat. Engagements included the Battle of St. Quentin Canal, Jonc de Mer Ridge, the Selle River, and Catillon. Several members of the unit received the Distinguished Service Cross, and one member of  Di Bella’s Company G received the Medal of Honor. Di Bella returned to the Unites States on December 16, 1918, and received his honorable discharge on February 8, 1919. The 1925 New York State census shows that he lived in Brooklyn, was married with two sons and was employed as a tailor. According to the 1940 census, he was living with his family at 515 Clinton Street in Brooklyn, was a naturalized citizen, and was employed as a garage hand; he had earned $1,393 in the previous year. His World War II Draft Registration Card of 1942 shows that he was employed at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, had no home telephone, and was still living at the Clinton Street address. Di Bella’s World War I military service is proudly displayed on his headstone. Section 6, lot 39340, grave 529.

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DOLANE, ALSTON STILLWELL (1896-1951). Private first class, 23rd Infantry, New York State National Guard, Company G; 106th Infantry Regiment, Company G, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Dolane, who was born and raised in Brooklyn, graduated from the 8th grade. According to his Draft Registration Card, filed on June 5, 1917, he was living at 175 Amity Street and was working as a helper for Frederick Loesher on Fulton Street. He was described as being of medium height and build with blue eyes and brown hair. He claimed exemption from the draft because his mother was dependent upon him for support. Nonetheless, Dolane enlisted in Company G of the 23rd Infantry, New York State National Guard, on September 23, 1917, which was re-designated as the 106th Infantry on October 1. When the unit went overseas on May 10, 1918, to join the American Expeditionary Forces, it was under the command of Colonel Franklin W. Ward and assigned to the 27th Infantry Division. It took part in the Ypres-Lys Offensive and the Second Somme Offensive. After the armistice was signed, Dolane remained with the unit until it returned to the United States on March 6, 1918. Shortly afterwards, on April 9, he was honorably discharged. In the New York City Directory of 1922, he was living at 465 McDonough Street in Brooklyn and was employed as a New York City policeman. The 1925 New York State census records that he was married and had a year-old daughter; he had a second daughter three years later. By the time of the 1930 census, he was living on 203rd Street in Queens in a house that he owned which was valued at $7,000, owned a radio set, was a veteran of the World War, and was employed as a police officer. In 1940, he was still working as a police officer at the station located at 138 West 30th Street in Manhattan, earning $3,000 per year, and living in a rental in Queens costing $45 per month. His World War II Draft Registration Form, filed in 1942, indicates that he was living at 90-25 77th Street in Woodhaven, Queens, and was still employed as a policeman. He last lived at 260-73 73rd Avenue in Bellerose, Queens; he died in front of 7514 88th Avenue in Woodhaven, Queens. Three months after his death, Ruth Dolane, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her husband’s World War I service. Section 99, lot 5944.

DOUGLAS, JR., WILLIAM LESLIE (1896-1918). Corporal, 14th Infantry, New York State National Guard, Company E, Headquarters Company, 27th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Douglas was born and raised in Brooklyn. On March 30, 1914, enlisted as a bugler in the 14th New York State National Guard, and mustered in on July 23. He was assigned as a reservist to Company E of the 14th Infantry on October 9. On October 11, 1917, he was reassigned to Headquarters Company. The 14th, which was redesignated as the 2nd Pioneer Infantry, was part of the 27th Division. As per his New York State Abstract, he was on furlough from November 22, 1917- December 1, 1917. Douglas went overseas on June 30, 1918, and was promoted to corporal on July 24 of the same year. While serving in France, he contracted pneumonia and influenza and died on December 7, 1918. His father, William L. Douglas, who lived with him at 10 Seeley Street in Brooklyn, was notified of his death. After his remains were returned to the United States, he was re-interred on July 27, 1921. Section 203, lot 35293, grave 2.

DUNSCOMB, CHARLES A. (1893-1933). Private, 312th Field Artillery, Battery C, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. According to the 1910 census, Dunscomb was born in Louisville, Kentucky, lived with his mother, grandmother and two sisters on 6th Avenue in Brooklyn, and worked as a “card boy” for a grocery business. His New York State Military Abstract shows that he was living at 557 Putnam Avenue in Brooklyn when he was inducted into the Army as a private on June 12, 1918. Dunscomb served in France from July 14, 1918 to June 18, 1919, and was honorably discharged on July 16, 1919. Upon return from service, the 1918 New York City Directory shows that he lived in New York City and was employed as a lock-maker. He last lived in Tappan, New York. His death was attributed to tuberculosis. On April 19, 1934, James Stoddard, the commander of the Tappan Zee Post No. 2769 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars (V.F.W.), applied to the War Department for a government-issued headstone, citing Dunscomb’s service in the World War. Section F, lot 19053.

DYBDAHL, BIRGER (1867-1918). Chief yeoman, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Navy. Born in Brooklyn and married in 1910, the New York City Directory of 1912 shows Dybdahl to be a machinist living at 408 669th Street in Brooklyn. On July 6, 1918, he enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve at New York City, rising in rank to chief yeoman. In little over three month’s time, Dybdahl was dead of broncho-pneumonia at Base No. 6 in Bordeaux, France. He was interred on November 10, 1918, just one day prior to the armistice that ended the war. His last residence was 747 45 Street in Brooklyn. Section 130, lot 35074.

dybdahl-stone

EDERLE, FREDERICK (1893–1918). Horseshoer, 305th Machine Gun Battalion, Company B, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Brooklyn, Ederle, at age 16, was employed as an office worker in a brewery, according to the 1910 census. He was inducted into the Army on November 23, 1917. On March 25, 1918, Ederle was assigned as a horseshoer. He served in Europe from March 29, 1918 until his death on September 8, 1918, from wounds received in action in France. His last residence was 256 15th Street in Brooklyn. His body was shipped back to New York and interred on September 11, 1921. Section 131, lot 35344, grave 3.

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EHLERS, CHARLES WILLIAM (1890-1962). Fireman first class, United States Navy. All records indicate that Ehlers was born on August 19. However, his gravestone and New York Military Abstract list his birth year as 1890 but other records indicate other birth years. According to the New York State Abstracts of World War I Military Service, which lists a birth year of 1890, Ehlers enlisted as a fireman second class aboard the USS Utah on December 19, 1913; on that date he was living at 78 New Jersey Avenue in Brooklyn. The Utah was sunk at Pearl Harbor 28 years later. As per his World War I Draft Registration Card dated September 12, 1918, which lists a birth year of 1896, he was a native born citizen, tall, of stout build, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He lived at 98 Hull Street in Brooklyn and worked as a marine fireman for a company located at 38 East 25th Street in Manhattan. After a brief assignment to the USS New York (April 6-May 9, 1917) as a fireman first class, Ehlers served aboard the USS Wisconsin. The Wisconsin, the last of the pre-dreadnought battleships, was launched in 1898. She served as a training ship for engine personnel after the United States entered World War I and was part of the Coastal Battleship Patrol Squadron. Ehlers served aboard the Wisconsin until December 17, 1917, when he was honorably discharged. On October 9, 1918, Ehlers enrolled in the Fleet Naval Reserve stationed on a receiving ship in New York Harbor until Armistice Day, November 11, 1918. His World War II Draft Registration Card, which indicates a birth year of 1892, shows that Ehlers lived at 319 Union Street in Jersey City, New Jersey, and was employed at Marine Middle Trust Company. Ehlers last lived at 319 Union Street in Jersey City; he died at the Riverview Hospital in Red Bank, New Jersey. Section 181, lot 10157.

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FALLS, JR., DeWITT CLINTON (1864-1937). Colonel, 7th Regiment, New York State National Guard, (107th New York Infantry), United States Army. Born in New York City, his father, also named DeWitt Clinton Falls, served in the 7th Regiment during the Civil War. Following in the footsteps of his father, he became a private in Company K of the 7th New York State National Guard on January 27, 1886, rose to corporal on January 10, 1889, sergeant major on October 26, 1894, first lieutenant and adjutant on July 5, 1895, and captain on June 2, 1899. In civilian life, Falls was an author, artist, expert on military heraldry, and designer of military insignia. After the Spanish-American War, he was charged with the responsibility of designing appropriate uniforms for tropical climates. Falls’s collection of drawings, military uniforms, and photographs became an important part of his legacy. When Falls applied for a passport in 1904, he was 5′ 10″ tall with a high forehead, brown eyes, light hair, straight nose, light complexion, and full face. During the first three decades of the 20th century, Falls was primarily stationed in Europe where he observed the military conflicts there and, at the start of World War I in Europe (1914), was in Belgium and England. Falls became a major in the 7th National Guard on June 21, 1916. During the U.S. participation in World War I, he was detailed into active duty as a major of the 7th Infantry National Guard beginning on August 5, 1917. The 7th became known as the 107th after 1917. He was promoted to colonel of the National Guard on September 5 and was assigned as a major to the United States Inspector General’s Office on October 10, 1918. The New York State Abstract of World War I Military Service notes that he was principally stationed at Washington, D.C., and received no wounds in action. He was honorably discharged on June 10, 1919. Falls remained active with the National Guard, becoming a colonel on June 23, 1921, and then retired as a brigadier general on September 7, 1928, according to a biographical sketch for the American Numismatic Society. Falls’s collection of militaria that is now archived at the New York Public Library includes his work on military affairs in England, France, Italy, and Europe 1926-1930. His New York State Military History Archive records that he was detailed to the Adjutant General’s Office from June 1, 1934 until his death on September 7, 1937. A prolific author, his books covered a range of subjects including An ABC of Golf (1898), The Mishaps of an Automobilist (1902), Army and Navy Information: Uniforms, Organizations, Arms, and Equipment of the Warring Powers (1917), Washington in War Times (1919), and History of the Seventh Regiment, 1889-1922 (1923). In 1923, he became a fellow of the American Numismatic Society (an organization dedicated to the study of coins, medals and tokens from all nations and cultures) and served on its Committee on Decorations, Insignia and War Medals. He served on the governing council of that organization until his death. The Numismatic Society has a collection of six of his illustrated notebooks that focus on war medals from the U.S. and foreign governments and the etiquette for wearing such decorations. Falls last lived at 610 Park Avenue in Manhattan but died in London, England, on September 7, 1937. His death was attributed to heart disease. An article about his funeral in The New York Times on October 3, 1937, reports that thousands lined Fifth Avenue to observe the ten-block long funeral procession that began at the Seventh Regiment Armory and ended at the St. Thomas Episcopal Church. His comrades were dressed in full-dress uniforms and marched to the muffled drum beat of funeral music. His coffin, draped in the American flag, had been lying in state at the Armory and was mounted on a horse-drawn carriage driven by comrades from the 112th New Jersey Field Artillery and followed by members and officers of the regiment, the 107th Infantry Post of the American Legion, the Military Order of Foreign Wars, and the Society of the Missing of the Colors. Invitees then entered the church preceded by the regimental crucifer (cross-bearer) and an honor guard. Hymns were sung at the service. The members of the regiment did not attend the funeral service and marched back to the armory at the conclusion of the procession. Family members and staff officers of the Seventh Regiment were present at the interment. An honor guard, composed of sixteen members of Company K, fired a salute of three volleys over his gravesite. Another article in The New York Times on May 10, 1938, reported that the New York Public Library received by bequest a collection of military memorabilia and sketchbooks of Brigadier General DeWitt Clinton Falls. The article indicated that Falls had been the commanding officer of the 107th Infantry Regiment, a unit that began in 1917 during World War I and which had its roots in the 7th Regiment; historically, the 7th Regiment was known for many of the social elite who were part of its ranks. The library exhibited about 500 pieces of his collection of photographs, scrapbooks, drawings of uniforms, manuscripts and other militaria as part of its “Military Costume” exhibit. There are seven boxes of his memorabilia in the Library’s archives. Section 45, lot 5518.

FEIL, WILLIAM (1895-1952). Private, Medical Department, 2nd Provisional Convalescent Company, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army.A native Brooklynite, Feil registered for the draft on June 5, 1917. As per his Draft Registration Card, he was of medium height and build, had brown eyes and black hair, and worked as a driver for Borden’s Milk Company; he lived at 426 East 83rd Street in Manhattan at that time. He asked for an exemption from the draft, noting that his aunt was dependent upon him for support. Nevertheless, he was inducted into the Army on August 5, 1918, and was assigned to the Medical Camp at Greenleaf, Georgia. Greenleaf was established in May of 1917, as a medical officer training camp. It also provided veterinary and dental training. In the 18 months of its existence, Greenleaf trained over 6,500 officers and 31,000 enlisted men. The application for his headstone notes that he also served at Camp Meade, Maryland. In October 1918, after training, Feil was re-assigned to Medical Department Base Hospital #92 at Pontanezen Barracks in Brest, France. He served abroad until December 13, 1918, and received an honorable discharge on January 14, 1919. According to the 1930 census, Feil was a World War veteran, lived on 14th Street in Brooklyn in a rental apartment with his wife and son, did not own a radio set, and worked as a chauffeur for a delivery company. At the time of the 1940 census, he was living in a rental in Queens with his wife and son, had completed schooling through the eighth grade, and had an annual income of $2,132. His World War II Registration Card of 1942 shows that he was living at 1858 Schenectady Avenue in Brooklyn and working for Oliver Brothers, a company on Canal Street in Manhattan. Feil died of peritonitis at the Veterans Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona; his home address was 4558 Kings Highway in Brooklyn. On October 18, 1852, Ella Feil, who lived with him on Kings Highway, applied for a government-issued headstone, citing William Feil’s service in World War I. Section 192, lot 32355.

FIELD, ROBERT OWEN (1895-1948). Corporal, United States Army. Field was born in New Jersey. The 1900 census indicates that he was living with his family in Manhattan; the 1910 census reports that the family had relocated to Hoboken, New Jersey. Field enlisted in the United States Army on December 15, 1917. According to the application for a government-issued headstone, he achieved the rank of corporal and was attached to the I.M.C. Replacement Troops but was listed as “unassigned.” He was discharged on November 23, 1918. The census of 1940 reports that he was single, lived with his brother’s family and mother, and had completed one year of high school. According to his World War II Draft Registration Card on April 25, 1942, he worked as chief clerk for the Works Projects Administration located at 124 Grand Street, Hoboken, New Jersey. At that time, he was described as 5′ 6″ inches tall, weighing 135 pounds, with a light complexion, brown eyes and hair, and had scars on his face. His last address was 1231 Park Avenue in Hoboken, New Jersey. On August 7, 1950, his family applied for a government-issued marble headstone with Christian emblem citing his World War I service. Section 193, lot 30383, grave 3.

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FINNERTY, DAVID FRANCIS (1891-1924). Second lieutenant, 22nd Infantry; 153rd Depot Brigade, United States Army. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Finnerty attended Brooklyn Polytechnic School, class of 1912; he was on the football team in 1911. He graduated from Georgetown University in 1916 with a law degree. According to the New York City Directory of 1916, he was employed by the Havana Camera Company at 38 Park Row in New York City. As per his New York State Military Abstract for World War I, Finnerty was called into active service as a second lieutenant on November 27, 1917; he lived at 1811 Voorhies Avenue in Brooklyn at that time. Finnerty received his training at Plattsburg Barracks, New York. Subsequent assignments were to Kelly Field in Texas and Fort Jay in New York. After serving in the 22nd Infantry until November 1918, Finnerty was transferred to the 153rd Depot Brigade stationed at Camp Dix, New Jersey until his honorable discharge on January 1, 1919. He did not serve overseas. His widow’s application for a military headstone on September 12, 1932, indicates that he also served in the Infantry Reserve Corps as a sergeant in Company K from September 13, 1920, until his honorable discharge on December 15, 1922. Finnerty applied for and received his passport on November 19, 1923. In his application, he noted that he was traveling to France for “tourist and health.” He also wrote that he planned to sail onboard the Rochambeau on November 23. According to Reports of Deaths of American Citizens Abroad, Finnerty died on July 24, 1924, at the Maison de Santé in Paris from an overdose of veronal-an exceedingly potent hypnotic, typically used in very small doses for insomnia. That report notes that he was embalmed and his remains were placed in the American Church in Paris and that his mother, Marian Finnerty, was notified of his death by telegraph. His widow, Mary, who had accompanied him to France, took his remains back to New York on July 30; he was interred on August 8, 1924. His last residence was 1215 Bergen Street in Brooklyn. Section 205, lot 29383.

FLYNN, WILLIAM J. (1882-1918). Private, 14th Infantry, New York State National Guard, Company K; 165th Infantry, Company I, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A Brooklynite by birth, the 1910 census indicates that Flynn was married one year and worked in the insurance business. On July 18, 1917, he enlisted in the New York State National Guard at Brooklyn and mustered into Company K of the 14th Infantry four days later. A month later, on August 21, he was reassigned to Company I of the 165th Infantry and reported to Camp Mills, New York, on August 25. His unit was part of the 27th Division. He was sent overseas with the 165th on December 4, 1917, and saw action at Baccarat, Champagne and Chateau Thierry. He was killed in action in France on July 28, 1918. Flynn’s mother, Elizabeth, was notified of his death. His last address was 250 15th Street in Brooklyn. After his remains were returned to the United States, he was re-interred on July 22, 1921. Section 117, lot 6797.

FOLLIART, JR., JAMES (1891-1918). Private first class, 307th Infantry, Companies K, L, and B, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. A native of Brooklyn, Folliart attended Public School 37 and then Brooklyn Boys High School where he played on its baseball team 1907 -1909, and was a member of the German Club in 1907. The 1910 census shows that he was living with his father and was employed as a clerk in the rubber industry. The 1915 New York State census has him still living with his father, but employed as an estimates clerk. Folliart’s 1917 Draft Registration Card describes him as tall and slender with blue eyes and brown hair. On September 30, 1917, Folliart was inducted into the Army and initially assigned to Company K, 307th Infantry. He was later transferred to Company L, and then Company B. On January 22, 1918, Folliart was promoted to private first class and on April 7, he shipped out to France. During World War I, the 307th was assigned to the 154th Infantry Brigade and became part of the 77th Infantry Division. That unit served with distinction in the following campaigns: Oise-Aisne, Meuse-Argonne, Champagne, and Lorraine. On August 28, 1918, Folliart was killed in action. His last residence was 34 Weirfield Street in Brooklyn. In 1921, his remains were returned home from France and were re-interred on June 11, 1921. Section 143, lot 23445, grave 1.

FRERICHS, FERDINAND J. (1894-1918). Private first class, 106th Machine Gun Battalion, Company B, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army; private, 1st Cavalry, Troop L, New York State National Guard, Born and raised in Brooklyn, he was the brother of Wilbur Frerichs (see). The family lived at 130 Underhill Avenue at the time of the 1910 census. Frerichs, nicknamed “Ferdie,” enlisted in the New York State National Guard on June 4, 1917. He was assigned to the 1st Cavalry on July 22 of that year and trained at Camp Wadsworth in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He joined Company B of the 106th Machine Gun Battalion on October 17, 1917, went overseas with his unit on May 10, 1918, and was promoted to private first class on July 29. The 106th was assigned to the 27th Infantry Division, 54th Infantry Brigade and participated in the Somme offensive in France that began on September 25, 1918, a battle to breach the German Hindenburg Line. It was there, on September 27, that Frerichs was killed in action. At the time of his death his family was vacationing at their summer home in Sea Cliff, New York. The Sea Cliff News published his obituary on November 2, 1918:

Ferdinand was the older of the “Frerichs boys” without whom no sports or summer social event was complete. Endowed with a fine sense of sportsmanship, a winning personality, a great affection for his home and friends, his popularity was a matter of course. He left his devoted family, a rapidly growing business of his own, and all that was of value to him, save loyalty and love of country to enlist in the cavalry more than a year ago….Those who grieve for his untimely passing, and the number is many, know that he died as he lived – all devotedly…making his great sacrifice splendidly.

…Mr. and Mrs. Frerichs were in Sea Cliff Monday planning to meet their younger son, Wilbur, now in service at Camp Upton at Farmingdale on his way home to Brooklyn for a short furlough….Mrs. Frerichs has been in very poor health for a long time and her friends fear the results of the shock of the loss of her son whose affection for her was one of his most delightful characteristics.

After his remains were returned from France to the United States, he was re-interred on August 1, 1921. His last address was 130 Underhill Avenue in Brooklyn. Section 130, lot 35459, grave 1.

Wilbur on left, Ferdinand on right

Wilbur on left, Ferdinand on right

Ferdinand Frerichs

Ferdinand Frerichs

FRERICHS, WILBUR EITZEN (1895-1966). Private, 152nd Depot Brigade, United States Army. A Brooklyn native, he was the younger brother of Ferdinand Frerichs (see). As per the census of 1910, the family lived at 130 Underhill Avenue in Brooklyn. He graduated from New York University in 1916. His Draft Registration Card, dated June 5, 1917, reports that he was single, short, stocky with blue eyes and blond hair. At that time, he was a clerk for Embry Beers Company, Inc. located on 24th Street in Manhattan. He was inducted into the Army on August 29, 1918, and assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade at Camp Upton in Yaphank, New York, in Suffolk County. He remained at Camp Upton for the duration of his tour of duty and was honorably discharged on December 13, 1918. The 1920 census lists his occupation as manager in the hosiery industry. According to the 1930 census, he was still living on Underhill Avenue with his mother, was a veteran of the World War, and was working as a salesman in the investments industry. As per his World War II Draft Registration Card, filed in 1942, he was married, self-employed and lived at 303 West Center Street in Medina, New York. The Hartford, Connecticut City Directory for 1946 reports that he was married, living at 186 Bonner Street, and working as a field underwriter; by 1953, he had moved to Haynes Street in Hartford. The Hartford Connecticut City Directory for 1956 indicates that he had moved to Guilford, Connecticut. He and his wife operated the Wilbur and Ruth Frerichs Real Estate Company in Hartford, from which he retired in 1960. As per his obituary in the Hartford Courant, he was a member of the First Congregational Church in Guilford, Veterans of the First World War, sponsor of the Long Wharf Theater in New Haven, a Freemason, and the first president of the Connecticut East Shore Chapter of the AARP (American Association of Retired Persons). His funeral was held at the First Congregational Church and a Masonic service was held for him at his lodge. His last address was 43 State Street, Guilford. He died of a heart attack at the Veteran’s Hospital in West Haven. Section 130, lot 35459, grave 3.

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Wilbur Frerichs

Wilbur Frerichs

FRIES, OTTO (1869–1922). Lieutenant, United States Navy. Born in Stuttgart, Germany, Fries immigrated to the United States in 1884, enlisted in the Navy in 1885, and served his apprenticeship aboard the USS St. Louis at League Island, Pennsylvania. Subsequently, New York State Abstracts of the Spanish-American War and World War I Service Records show that Fries received an appointment as gunner on August 22, 1895. He made his career in the Navy, advancing from chief gunner in 1904, to lieutenant junior grade on October 15, 1917, and lieutenant on August 3, 1920. During the Spanish–American War, Gunner Fries served at Navy yards in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and in Key West, Florida. He served aboard the USS Kentucky. He also served aboard the USS Glacier during the Philippine Insurrection of 1899-1902. During the entire period of World War I, he was assigned to the Philadelphia Navy Yard. He last lived in Philadelphia. Fries died at the U.S. Naval Hospital there from arteriosclerosis. Section 132, lot 32803, grave 2.

FORD, FULLERTON (1899-1919). Electrician 1st class radio, United States Navy. Ford was born in Brooklyn, the eldest of three children. As per the 1910 census, he lived on East 10th Street in Brooklyn. At the time of his military service, he lived at 205 Sterling Place in Brooklyn. On March 21, 1917, he enlisted in the United States Navy and was stationed at the Headquarters of the 3rd Naval District at the Navy Yard in Brooklyn from April 7, 1917 to June 3, 1918, where he attained the rank of electrician 3rd class radio. Ford was temporarily assigned to the Armed Draft Detail, New York, for the week of June 3-10, 1918. He then served on the USS Black Hawk as an electrician 2nd class radio from June 10 to August 29, 1918. From August 29 to November 11, 1918, the day the armistice was signed, he served on the USS Roanoke as an electrician 1st class radio. Ford was honorably discharged on March 4, 1919, at the Naval Hospital at Newport, Rhode Island. On April 11, 1919, he applied for a Seaman’s Protection Certificate. His application states that he was 5′ 6″ tall with a ruddy complexion, brown hair and gray eyes and with a physical mark identified as a “malformation of chest.” He promised to defend the United States Constitution against enemies foreign and domestic as part of the aforementioned application. Ford died four months later, just shy of his 20th birthday, at his home at 205 Sterling Place. His death was attributed to chronic myocarditis. A requiem mass was held at St. Joseph’s Church, at Pacific Street near Vanderbilt Avenue in Brooklyn. In 1940, Mary Elizabeth Ford, his mother, applied to the War Department for a government-issued headstone for her son, citing his service in the World War. Section 193, lot 30883, grave 4.

Fullerton Ford

Fullerton Ford

GARRISON, HORTON BLAUVELT (1896-1964). Corporal, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Garrison was born in Red Bank, New Jersey. According to the inscription on his headstone, Garrison served in France at Base Hospital 67. Base Hospital 67 was located in the city of Mesves in the French Department of Nievre. This department contained twenty-two different camps with a military population of about 50,000. At the time of the armistice on November 11, 1918, the hospital complexes at Mesves and Mars-sur-Allier housed about 30,000 patients. Mesves was classified as a Type A Unit with tents. Census data shows that in 1935 he was married with two children and lived in Red Bank, New Jersey. At that time, he was a salesman who had completed one year of college and earned $1,200. As per his World War II Draft Registration of April 1942, Garrison lived at 319 Branch Avenue in Red Bank, New Jersey, and worked for Ehret-Day, a contractor. On July 20, 1960, he applied for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution. He last lived in Red Bank, New Jersey. Section 41, lot 2951.

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Hospital Base Camp in France

Hospital Base Camp in France

GEBHARDT, GEORGE J. (1889–1918). Lieutenant, 2nd Pioneer Infantry; 106th Infantry, 27th Division, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in New York City, the 1910 census shows that Gebhardt was single and living with his parents in Brooklyn. He was employed as a shoe-laster, one who fastens the upper part of the shoe to the sole. Gebhardt’s 1917 Draft Registration Card shows that he was the assistant sexton for the Knox Memorial Church at 405 West 41st Street in New York City. He was of medium height and weight with blue eyes and blond hair. On June 11, 1917, Gebhardt enlisted in the 2nd Pioneer Infantry (14th Infantry of the New York State National Guard) and received his commission as lieutenant on July 22 before transferring to the 106th Infantry, 27th Division on October 17, 1917. On May 10, 1918, Gebhardt shipped out to France. On July 27, the 27th Division rotated to the front in relief of the British 6th Division. Later, the 106th Infantry, along with the rest of the 27th Division, launched a successful attempt to break the German Hindenburg Line. On November 8, just three short days from the armistice ending the war, Gebhardt died of pneumonia. His last residence was on West 11th Street in Brooklyn. His remains were returned to the United States in 1921 and were re-interred on July 14, 1921. Section 132, lot 33019, grave 2.

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GERKEN, CLARENCE JOHN (1892-1918). Chief machinist’s mate, United States Navy. A resident of Brooklyn, Gerken enlisted in the United Stated Navy on September 20, 1917, and was assigned to Section Base 6 in Brooklyn as a machinist’s mate second class. The job of a machinist’s mate entails the operation, maintenance and repair of ship machinery and auxiliary equipment. On October 8, 1917, he served on the USS Adams for less than a month before being promoted to chief machinist’s mate while temporarily assigned to the USS Granite for only two days (November 4 -November 6). On November 6, Gerken was assigned to the US Sub Chaser 177 out of New London, Connecticut. He served aboard the sub chaser until February 4, 1918, less than three weeks before the 177 left New London for overseas convoy service. He remained at the New London receiving barracks until March 26, at which time he was admitted to the Naval hospital there; he died four days later of cardiac dilation. His headstone reads: “Died in Service to his Country.” His last residence was 900 Kings Highway in Brooklyn. Section 203, lot 28787.

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GLADDING, EDWIN G. (1888-1918). Private, 152nd Depot Brigade, United States Army. A New York City native, Gladding was barely married two months when he was inducted into the military on August 30, 1918; his wife woke up at home and saw him standing at the foot of the bed in his uniform. He was attached to the 152nd Depot Brigade. This unit was charged with processing military personnel for deployment to France. After a month and a half in the service, he contracted Spanish influenza (during the 1918 flu pandemic) and died at Camp Mills, Long Island (now Garden City), on October 14, 1918. His last residence was 1041 Rogers Avenue in Brooklyn. Lot 5499, grave 2074.

HALLENBECK, CHARLES S. (1894-1920). Sergeant, Chemical Warfare Service Company; private, 152nd Depot Brigade, United States Army. Hallenbeck was born in Brooklyn. Before World War I, he had served about ten months as a private in the 23rd Infantry of the New York State National Guard in the Mexican Punitive Campaign as a bugler as of June 21, 1916, and was discharged on April 4, 1917. Apparently, he was declared unfit for duty after a combination of hikes and heat made him physically ill. As per an article about Hallenback in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle on September 30, 1917, he served in the British Admiralty as chief wireless operator on the steamer Welsh Prince from February through June 1915 transporting horses to Europe from the United States. Hallenbeck recalled that on the first of his four trips, the Welsh Prince carried 1,100 artillery horses in crowded conditions. He said, “Conditions were terrible for the animals and we lost at least five or six each day. They were hoisted overboard and proved tasty bits for the sharks which followed us all the way across.” Further, the ship had provisions for sixteen days while the trip took twenty-two days leaving the men and animals in dire straits. He recalled that the six months of service to the British Admiralty were enough for one man to tolerate; he slept about four hours a night, heard stories about German atrocities from French non-combatants, and worked with an inexperienced crew. He also felt that some of the German people whom he interviewed had no grievances against the French and in their hearts, did not support the war. That article goes on to report that he found himself lost in a trench when he was on a sightseeing tour in France in the spring of 1915 with three officers from the Welsh Prince. The four, on a train from Bordeaux to Paris, found themselves in a trench zone under bombardment. The men got separated from the other train passengers and rather than finding the train, found themselves inside the trenches. It took two days for them to secure a pass to get out of the trenches; luckily, they were treated well and were unharmed. His World War I Draft Registration Card of June 5, 1918, shows that he was tall and slender, with blue eyes and light-colored hair. At that time, he was single, employed as a clerk for the Royal Baking Powder Company, and lived at 1150 54th Street in Brooklyn. He was inducted into the regular army on May 28, 1918, and assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade at Camp Upton in Yaphank, Long Island. He was re-assigned to the Chemical Warfare Service Company, which was established on June 28, 1918, to study poison gas as an offensive weapon and how to defend against it. Hallenbeck was promoted to sergeant upon transfer to that unit on October 18, 1918. He received his honorable discharge on December 13, 1918. As per his Military Abstract, he did not serve overseas. He died on Mount Baldy, California, while climbing to the summit to watch the sunrise with two friends. The cause of his death was heart disease. His obituary in the Brooklyn Daily Eagle notes that he was a Freemason; his fraternal brothers were invited to attend his funeral at his last residence at 1150 54th Street. Section 16, lot 14888, grave 193.

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HEILMANN, CARL ANTHONY (1886-1919). Captain, 115th Engineers, 5th Engineers; first lieutenant, 303rdEngineers, 108th, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Heillmann may not buried at Green-Wood; there is no record of him in the Green-Wood database. If that is the case, the headstone with his name inscribed is a cenotaph honoring his memory; the stone is on his family’s lot. A Brooklyn native, Heilmann lived there with his parents and younger brother at the time of the 1900, 1905, and 1910 censuses; the 1915 New York State census lists him as a mechanical engineer living with his parents at 1265 45th Street in Brooklyn. He studied at American University in Washington D.C., where he was a member of the Officers Reserve Corps. After his graduation in June 1917, Heilmann entered the Army as a first lieutenant of engineers on July 10. He was assigned to the 303rd Engineers until December 7, 1917, and a few days later he went overseas to join the American Expeditionary Force with the 108th Engineers. Returning to the United States on April 13, 1918, he joined the 115th Engineers on May 16, and was promoted to the rank of captain on June 10, 1918. On July 20, he transferred to the 5th Engineers. While stateside, he was variously stationed at Camp Kearny and Camp Logan in California, Camp Dix, New Jersey, Fort Myer and Camp Humphreys (both in Virginia). It was while stationed at Camp Humphreys that he tragically died of drowning due to an automobile accident in Fairfax, Virginia, on July 12, 1919. His mother was notified of his death; remains were sent to his mother for burial. His last address was 1572 42nd Street, Brooklyn. Section 131, lot 35378.

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HEINRICH, JOHN A. (1892-1956). Private first class, 226th Aero Squadron, United States Air Service. Born in Flushing, New York, Heinrich spent most of his life in New Jersey. The 1910 census recorded him as single, living with his parents and younger sister on South 18th Street in Newark, New Jersey, and employed as a bookkeeper at a steel warehouse. His World War I Draft Registration Card lists him as tall, of medium build with blue eyes and brown hair. At the time of his registration, he was working as a clerk for the Carnegie Steel Company. As per the application for a government-issued headstone, Heinrich enlisted on December 13, 1917, and was assigned to the 226th Aero Squadron of the United States Air Service, a forerunner of the Air Force. He achieved the rank of private first class and was honorably discharged on December 12, 1918. The application also shows that he was awarded a bronze medal. At the time of his marriage in 1920, he lived in Irvington, New Jersey. The 1930 census lists Heinrich as married, living on Sanford Avenue in Newark, New Jersey, employed as a clerk for a steel company, and a veteran of the World War. According to the 1840 census, he was living at 165 Isabella Avenue in Newark with his wife and no children, paying $42 per month in rent, working as an office clerk, earning $2,080 that year, and having attained an eighth grade education. His World War II Draft Registration Card, filed in 1942, indicates that he lived at 543 Sanford Avenue in Newark, and worked for Scully Steel Products there. He last lived at the Sandford Avenue address; records indicate that he died at the U. S. Steel Corporation in Newark. On May 13, 1957, Marion Heinrich, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her husband’s service in World War I. Section 174, lot 18001, vault.

HELLMUTH, JOHN HENRY (1889-1950). Private first class, 116th Military Police Corps, Company B; 267th Military Police Corps; private, 152nd Depot Brigade, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Brooklyn, Hellmuth was the youngest of five children. According to the 1910 census, they lived at 174 Montrose Avenue in Brooklyn with their mother; at that time, Hellmuth worked as a salesman at a department store. On January 2, 1918, he was inducted into the United States Army and assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade at Camp Upton, New York. The depot brigades were organized to receive, train, and assign recruits to permanent military units prior to being sent to France to join the American Expeditionary Forces. Hellmuth was sent overseas on March 12, 1918, and assigned to Company B of the 116th Military Police Corps, from April 9 until May 6, 1918. He then transferred to the 267th Military Police Corps, was promoted to private first class on August 1, 1918, and remained with that unit until he returned to the United States on July 6, 1919; he was honorably discharged ten days later. He married four months after returning home. According to the 1930 census, he was married with one son, lived in a rental at 123-10 Hillside Avenue in Richmond Hill, Queens, did not own a radio set, was a veteran of the World War, and was employed as a New York City policeman. According to the 1932 West Stockbridge City Directory, the Hellmuths also had a residence on Salisbury Road in West Stockbridge, Massachusetts. His 1942 World War II Draft Registration Card reports that he was still a patrolman who was stationed at the Mayor’s office at City Hall, had a home telephone, and lived at 123-10 Hillside Avenue in Queens. That address also was his last residence. On June 18, 1950, Grace Hellmuth, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her husband’s service in the Military Police Corps in World War I. Section 183, lot 20256, grave 1.

HERBERT, HARRY W. (1896–1918). Unknown soldier history. Herbert, who born in Brooklyn, died in France of pneumonia on October 31, 1918. The details of his service in World War I are unknown. His last residence was 725 Elmont Place in Brooklyn. After France allowed soldiers buried there to have their remains returned to the United States, Herbert’s family elected to do so and he was re-interred at Green-Wood on March 24, 1921. Section ?, lot 35656, grave 4.

HOEFLINGER, HERMAN (or HEMA, HERMANY) G. (1893-1932). Private first class, 307th Infantry, Company A, 77 Division; private, 152nd Depot Brigade, Company C; 123rd Infantry, Company C; 331st Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. Born in Brooklyn, he enlisted as a private in Company A of the 7th Infantry of the New York State National Guard on June 3, 1916. Hoeflinger’s Draft Registration Card of June 5, 1917, describes him as single, of medium height and build with brown eyes and hair. At that time, he was a clerk at the Underwood Typewriter Company and lived at 452 51st Street in Brooklyn; he claimed no previous military service. According to his New York State Military Abstract, Hoeflinger was inducted on July 24, 1918, and first assigned to the 152nd Depot Brigade until September 25, 1918. He was then re-assigned to several units during the period from October 7, 1918, to April 28, 1919, when Hoeflinger served in France. He was assigned to Company C of the 123rd Infantry until October 26, to the 331st Infantry until November 5, and then to Company A of the 307th Infantry until he was demobilized and received his honorable discharge on May 9, 1919. It was on March 21, 1919, shortly before he returned to the United States, that he was promoted to private first class. The 307th Infantry was part of the 77th Division. This division served with distinction in France and suffered over 10,000 casualties, of which almost 1,500 were killed. As per the census of 1920, he was married with no children, lived on 50th Street in Brooklyn, and was self-employed in the real estate business. The 1930 census reports that Hoeflinger was married with two sons, was a self-employed carpenter, had served in the World War, and lived in Mount Pleasant in Westchester, New York, in a house that he owned. He last lived in Hawthorne, New York. His death was caused by cancer. His obituary in The New York Times, which confirms his service in the American Expeditionary Forces, mentions that he was secretary of the Hawthorne Water Commission and a charter member and finance officer of the Union Post of The American Legion. On October 11, 1932, two months after his death, Mabel Hoeflinger, his widow, applied for a government-issued headstone citing her husband’s service in the 307th Infantry. Section 132, lot 33374, grave 2.

Men of the 307th Infantry Regiment regimental band, marching on a road near Famechon, France, 7 June 1918.

Men of the 307th Infantry Regiment regimental band, marching on a road near Famechon, France, June 7, 1918.

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HORTON, ROBERT S. (1895-1919). Rank unknown, Fifth Division Motor Supply Train, Company E, American Expeditionary Forces, United States Army. As per his father’s affidavit, filed in petition for probate, Robert S. Horton entered United States military service in November 1917. He was assigned to the Fifth Division Motor Supply Train, Company E. He sailed for Europe in June 1918. He died in Luxemburg, Germany, on February 13, 1919. The cause of death was pneumonia. His last residence was 916 Albemarle Road in Brooklyn. His body was returned to New York and he was interred on October 27, 1920. Survived by his parents and sister, Horton’s will indicates that he left $400 in personal property. Section ?, lot 19496, grave 3.

HORTON, WALTER DIVINE (1894-1953). Private, Medical Department, United States Army. Horton was born in Brooklyn. According to the 1910 census, he was living with his father, two brothers, sister and grandfather at 164 41st Street in Brooklyn. He started high school but left in his second year. The New York State census of 1915 lists his occupation as “fashion designer.” Horton’s Draft Registration Card of June 5, 1917, notes his occupation as bookbinder. At that time, he was described as tall, of medium build with brown eyes and black hair. He enlisted in the United States Army on September 5, 1918, and worked for the hospital medical department with the rank of private. The application for a government-issued headstone notes that Horton worked at Hospital #3 in New York. He was honorably discharged on July 14, 1919; he did not serve overseas. As per the 1920 census, he was living with his father and brother on 42nd Street in Brooklyn and employed as a case maker for a bookbinder. The 1940 census indicates that Horton was married, lived at 565 85th Street in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, where he paid $45 per month in rent, earned $2,640 that year, and worked as a supervisor. His 1942 World War II Draft Registration Card shows that he was living at 351 47th Street in Brooklyn and was unemployed; he cited his sister, Mrs. William Grube, as the next of kin. On September 8, 1953, four months after his death, his sister, Blanche Grube, who lived with him at 650 77th Street in Brooklyn, applied for a government-issued headstone with a Christian emblem, citing her brother’s service in the Medical Department in World War I. Section 136, lot 28307, grave 898.

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HOUSTON, SHELDON CLARKE (1889–1918). Unknown soldier history. According to the 1910 census, Houston was born in Massachusetts and lived in New Jersey. He was employed as an inspector in the lighting industry and was single at the time. On June 5, 1917, Houston registered for the draft at Local Board No.130, but further details of his military service are unknown. As per cemetery records, Houston was killed in action in France on November 3, 1918, eight days before the end of the war. His last residence was in Haworth, New Jersey. His remains were returned to the states in 1921 and he was interred on May 24, 1921. Section 36, lot 13133.

INGEBRAND (or DUGEBRAND), HERMAN BERTRAND (1896-1978). Apprentice seaman, United States Navy. Ingebrand was born in New York City and was the youngest of ten siblings. According to the 1910 census, his family was living at 1034 Stebbins Avenue in the Bronx. By the time of the 1915 New York State census, Ingebrand was working as a clerk at a law office. As per his Draft Registration Card of June 5, 1917, he was tall, with blue eyes and dark brown hair and was working in Hoboken, New Jersey; he still lived at the Stebbins Avenue address. On July 22, 1918, he enlisted in the United States Navy at the Naval Training Camp in Pelham Park, New York. According to his New York State Abstract of World War I Military Service, he was inducted on September 5, 1918, and trained at Pelham Park with the rank of apprentice seaman until October 1. He was then assigned to the Naval Hospital at Pelham Park until November 11, and was honorably discharged on December 22, 1918. The 1925 New York State census notes that he was living in the Bronx with his mother and six siblings and working as a construction foreman. At the time of the 1930 census, he had been married two years, was living in Queens, and was employed as a contractor doing excavation work. The 1930 census notes that he was a World War veteran and owned a radio set. As per his World War II Draft Registration Form, filed in 1942, he was working for Starrett Brothers and Eken (the contractors who built the Empire State Building and later, Stuyvesant Town in Manhattan and Starrett City in Brooklyn); at that time, he lived temporarily at 4102 3rd Road North in Arlington Virginia, but listed his home address as 30-20 37th Street in Astoria, New York. Section 58, lot 5506.

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IPPOLITO, JOHN (1895-1977). Private, 42nd Infantry, Company E; 151st Depot Brigade, United States Army. Originally from Italy and the eldest of five children, the Ippolito family immigrated to the United States in 1911 (though the 1930 census says 1915). On May 23, 1918, he entered the service as a private in Company E of the 42nd Infantry. He transferred to the 151st Depot Brigade on August 24, 1918, at Camp Devens, Massachusetts, and remained with that unit until he was honorably discharged on November 30, 1918; he did not serve overseas. The 1920 census indicates that he was a barber, had become a naturalized citizen and was living with his parents and siblings at 2187 Second Avenue in Manhattan. The 1930 census notes that he had been married for three years, was living on 31st Street in Brooklyn with his wife and daughter, was a veteran of the World War, and was a driver for the New York City Department of Street Cleaning. Section 6, lot 39340.

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ISDELL, WILLIAM A. (1888-1939). Private, 152nd Depot Brigade, 31st Company, United States Army. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Isdell lived, in 1915, with his mother and two sisters, according to the New York State census. A newlywed, Isdell’s military service began at age 30 on July 24, 1918, as a private in the 152nd Depot Brigade. The 152nd did not see combat and was stationed at Camp Upton in Yaphank, Long Island. The role of the depot brigades was to receive and organize recruits, provide uniforms, equipment, and training before their departure to France. It is interesting to note that the well-known songwriter Irving Berlin also served in the 152nd; Berlin wrote the musical revue Yip Yip Yaphank which included the song Oh! How I Hate to Get Up in the Morning while stationed there. Isdell received an honorary discharge on December 12, 1918, and returned to civilian life as a salesman for the Edison Company. He last lived at 109-54 Lefferts Boulevard in Queens, New York. Section 45, lot 10361.